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Questions For Setting Drain/Timer For Compressor

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  • Questions For Setting Drain/Timer For Compressor

    Just installed a new Quincy 60 gallon vertical compressor. Wanting to keep the moisture out, I'm going to install a digital timer to force out moisture. My system looses about 20 lbs. a week, and it's for a home shop, so in the auto position the compressor would only come on once every 10 days. The new digital timer can be set 0.5-99 seconds open, and 0.5-60 minutes closed. This seems to me to be a lot of wasted air if set in these parameters. So I added a 7 day timer.
    How would you set the drain to open? Once a week? How long?
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  • #2
    No need for timer. You can get a float operated drain valve for that purpose.
    Helder Ferreira
    Setubal, Portugal

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    • #3
      https://www.amazon.com/HAD20B-Automa...7622271&sr=8-2


      Brand: Walfront
      Helder Ferreira
      Setubal, Portugal

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      • #4
        the compressors we use at work all have auto drains on them set for every .5 hour for 10 seconds blowdown. What little air is wasted is inconsequential when assuring that moisture is reduced in your tank. Jim

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        • #5
          My champion is set for 2 seconds every 90 mins. I live in South LA though, 100% humidity all the time.

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          • #6
            Replace that line from the compressor head to the tank with a coil of copper tubing that's 10' long or so. That will cool the air, causing the moisture to condense and drop into the tank. Of course, the tank itself does that, but the condensing coil will really help to give you dry air.

            Mount the coil so it's vertical, air going into the top, out at the bottom, of course.

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            • #7
              You got a Quincy and Flexzilla hose, you're doing it right.

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              • #8
                Thanks for all the suggestions. I already have the timer so I will use it or just drain the compressor the day I use it. I like having air available all the time so that's why I got the timer. I will exhaust it out through the wall and I don't want to disturb the neighbors or scare off the deer we have around here, so I was thinking twice a week for 30 seconds around noon.
                My last compressor is still good (I think) and only drained the tank maybe 3 times a year. It's over 30 years old. I'm 66 years old and if this one last 30 years I think it will out last me. Don't worry I still buy green bananas.

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                • #9
                  Does no one else use the automatic unloader triggered drain? I've had one from HF for over 20 years and tank draining is something I don't have to think about. It drains at the start and end of every cycle.

                  https://www.harborfreight.com/automa...kit-68244.html
                  Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by gellfex View Post
                    Does no one else use the automatic unloader triggered drain? I've had one from HF for over 20 years and tank draining is something I don't have to think about. It drains at the start and end of every cycle.

                    https://www.harborfreight.com/automa...kit-68244.html
                    I think I blew through 3-4 of those, one a year, until I bought a Kingston 620 as a replacement. Never had a problem after that.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by rkepler View Post

                      I think I blew through 3-4 of those, one a year, until I bought a Kingston 620 as a replacement. Never had a problem after that.
                      I looked at the reviews after I posted, boy it seems like there are lots of experiences at both end of the pole with that device. Mine is like 20 years old and still works fine. I did have an issue with the heat blowing out the cheap hose that came with it but I simply replaced that.

                      I see that Kingston device is about 60 bucks, totally worth it if it does the job, so much easier than any of the more complex ideas discussed in the thread.
                      Last edited by gellfex; 04-06-2021, 04:08 PM.
                      Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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                      • #12
                        Seems to me you have that backwards. You want the air to go into that copper tube at the bottom and out the top. If the air goes out the bottom, it will be traveling THROUGH any water that is collected there and picking up moisture again.

                        Either mount that coil high enough so that the water drains back into the tank where it is discharged by whatever means you use OR put a drain jar at the entrance point of the copper tube so you can drain the water there. The jar will keep it from forming a puddle at the bottom of the copper coil so the air does not have to pass through the water.

                        I have built air systems that did not ever pass even a single drop of water in years of operation and this was always my first step. I used more like 50 or 100 feet of copper tube.



                        Originally posted by jdunmyer View Post
                        Replace that line from the compressor head to the tank with a coil of copper tubing that's 10' long or so. That will cool the air, causing the moisture to condense and drop into the tank. Of course, the tank itself does that, but the condensing coil will really help to give you dry air.

                        Mount the coil so it's vertical, air going into the top, out at the bottom, of course.
                        Paul A.
                        SE Texas

                        And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                        You will find that it has discrete steps.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          HF = $8.99

                          Kingston ~= $60

                          Is there anything in-between? I already checked Grainger. They start at several hundred.



                          Originally posted by gellfex View Post

                          I looked at the reviews after I posted, boy it seems like there are lots of experiences at both end of the pole with that device. Mine is like 20 years old and still works fine. I did have an issue with the heat blowing out the cheap hose that came with it but I simply replaced that.

                          I see that Kingston device is about 60 bucks, totally worth it if it does the job, so much easier than any of the more complex ideas discussed in the thread.
                          Paul A.
                          SE Texas

                          And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                          You will find that it has discrete steps.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Paul,
                            Perhaps I wasn't clear: The cooling coil should be mounted above the tank, air going into the top, discharging from the bottom into the tank. The idea is to condense the moisture and let it drop into the tank. If the air is still hot when it enters the tank, it'll retain the moisture and carry it into the piping if you're using a lot of air.

                            In my own setup, I have 2, 10' lengths of finned tube heat exchanger pipe (3/4" size pipe) that discharge into the tank near the bottom. Air leaves the top of the tank, goes through a 3/4" filter, then to the distribution piping. That filter bowl never has any water in it. The reservoir is an old "sidearm" galvanized water heater tank that I drain every year or so, as it's hard to get at the valve.

                            I never have moisture in the air, even if I'm using a grinder or air arc, keeping the compressor running continuously.

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