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Ball end mill in steel?

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  • elf
    replied
    90 degrees = 45 degrees 2 hours after regular bedtime

    Here are the settings for a V groove instead of ballnose:
    Click image for larger version

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  • Bob La Londe
    replied
    Originally posted by Black Forest View Post
    The V grove does sound like a better solution. I need to measure the only V grove end mill I have. I think it is too big and I just bought 3 solid carbide round end mills!
    A v-groove end mill has the same problem as a ball end mill, but with less strength in the tip. In my not so humble freaking opinion the way to over come cutting issues and make a V-groove is to use the side of a regular endmill and do the basic math to get the groove dimensions to do the job.
    Click image for larger version

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  • Black Forest
    replied
    I will just run my cutter perpendicular to the material. And I figured out it needs to be 2.5mm deep not 3mm. Click image for larger version

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  • Black Forest
    replied
    Originally posted by TGTool View Post

    A cylinder cut at 45 degrees describes an ellipse. That may or may not be what you want.
    What I meant was I would offset the normal flat end end mill to a point on the shaft that would be 45 degrees so the cutter would engage the shaft to be cut.

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  • TGTool
    replied
    Originally posted by Black Forest View Post

    I would think I would rotate the shaft 45 degrees to get the V correct geometrically.
    A cylinder cut at 45 degrees describes an ellipse. That may or may not be what you want.

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  • Black Forest
    replied
    Originally posted by elf View Post
    Just rotate the shaft 90 degrees and use a standard flat endmill to cut a V groove.
    I would think I would rotate the shaft 45 degrees to get the V correct geometrically.

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  • elf
    replied
    Just rotate the shaft 90 degrees and use a standard flat endmill to cut a V groove.

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  • john b
    replied
    Jeez, it's an endmill that was designed to do what you want it to do. Cut your groove.

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  • Illinoyance
    replied
    If you want to be able to rotate the shaft past the detent position the groove is too deep. If the shaft will be permanently held by the detent your 3mm depth is fine.

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  • GadgetBuilder
    replied
    Originally posted by Black Forest View Post
    The V grove does sound like a better solution. I need to measure the only V grove end mill I have. I think it is too big and I just bought 3 solid carbide round end mills!
    Could you use a common end mill and offset from the center of the shaft so you contact near the 45 degree point?
    A little trig (or CAD) should allow you to find the offset you need to get the desired width of "V".

    Another option would be to scribe a line centered where the ball will contact the shaft. Then use a spotting drill to make divots on this line at the desired angular positions; the ball will index at these positions. Again, you may need a shaft lock if there is any appreciable torque on the shaft.

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  • Rich Carlstedt
    replied
    Originally posted by Black Forest View Post
    I need to make half round groves in steel with a 6mm round end mill. So the final depth will be 3mm I suppose. The grove will be in a 30mm round shaft. My question is, do I do it in one pass or multiple passes? I have never used a ball end mill before. It is a carbide mill. The grove will be used for indexing on the shaft. A spring loaded ball thingy will be mounted in a block of steel. The ultimate use will be for a table on a belt grinder. Do I use the same speeds and feeds as a normal carbide endmill?
    We did most of our mill work in the die shop with Ball Endmills.
    You should have no problem doing your task with one pass. If it is a 4 flute, then I suggest air or coolant to clear chips. A 2 flute works pretty good
    Your 3 mm depth means the cutter will not be at full depth as you are only 10% of shaft Diameter and the shafts radius will not have a 6mm groove width .
    You shouldn't have a issue with the center mark from the ball mill, but if it is obnoxious, use a 6mm cartridge roll for polishing
    Suggest a OSG ballmill if you want quality
    Rich

    No affiliation with the following link

    https://www.3m.com/3M/en_US/company-...94857497&rt=r3

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  • tom_d
    replied
    Originally posted by DR View Post
    If the job justifies the cost, you're much better off using a cutter like a key seat cutter with a radius ground on the cutting tips. Then you approach the work from the side. No dead zone of the cutter as with the tip of a ball end mill.

    In a pinch I've been known to even hand grind a radius on a single tip cutter to accomplish the round shape slot.
    This. If the setup allows. A piece of HSS mounted in a fly cutter and away you go. Otherwise, ball end mill tilted if the setup allows. If the spindle must remain perpindicular to the work, then run the spindle at max rpm, around 5000 if possible. I would do it in two or three passes.

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  • old mart
    replied
    Try one pass if you have more than one cutter, I would tend to chicken out and go for three passes, 5/8, 7/8 and finish. Or rough out with a more conventional shape.

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  • Fasturn
    replied
    Ball mills are like threading tools. First or 2 pass can be pretty deep, but the finish cut is light or just a spring pass. Also depends on how ridged your machine is ? Turning the head is a interesting idea, but then you have to tram it back in. I am too lazy to do all that.

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  • Black Forest
    replied
    The V grove does sound like a better solution. I need to measure the only V grove end mill I have. I think it is too big and I just bought 3 solid carbide round end mills!

    Leave a comment:

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