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Some woodworking using the metalworking tools

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  • Some woodworking using the metalworking tools

    I had a couple woodworking jobs to do that wanted a router, and a lathe. Well, I have a router, but it was not something that was a good idea to do with the had-held router, and I have not yet adapted it to the router table I have.

    So, I was making in the first place, some handles for the longer straightedge I got recently. Wood handles keep your hot hands from expanding the "camel-back" and making the thing curve slightly when you want it to be straight. Scraping means working to tenths, and that is territory where heat can cause issues.

    I had two things to do. First, I needed to cut out wood and leave a shape that would fit into the oblong holes in the "camelback" and clear the edge of the camelback as well. Each hole is the shape of a somewhat bent hot dog, as you can see in the pic below.

    For that routing I used a 3/8" diameter end mill, because I seem to have misplaced the box of bits for my rather seldom-used router. It worked fine, but while I thought I took a picture, it seems that I did not. I think the camera battery was dead, and I was supposed to charge it and didn't.

    I just did the "Etch -a-Sketch" routine with the dials, and followed the outlines I had marked on the wood. Worked fine at about 2000 rpm or so. Oddly, I found there was a difference climb milling vs conventional milling even in wood. I had not figured there was.

    By the way, having x and y feeds on a "router" turns out to be really really nice for stuff like this. I can totally see having a very similar head over an x-y table for this sort of job. And I have an extra vertical head that needs bearings and a new spindle.... hmmmmmm.

    Anyway, after that I wanted a groove for a finger grip. Again, I could not find my router bits, so I got out my largest countersink, and used it as a router bit. Looked scary, but worked perfectly. I saw the "stickout", and was concerned that the thing might creep out of the collet, but I marked with a sharpie on the shank, and checked regularly. It never budged.

    When I find my router bits I may enlarge the finger grips, I think I would like them deeper. I'll do the same thing as with the countersink, but with the router bit instead, assuming I have one the shape I want. If not, well, I have a shop and can have any cutter I want badly enough to make.

    The scary countersink "router bit" (which is about an inch diameter, and stuck out 2 inches):



    The handles on the straightedge:



    So, next I wanted a wood handle, the cross piece for the "D" handle on an english style garden spade. No clue where the handle piece went, the spade was down at the volunteer plant potting and sale site for the local public garden maintenance volunteer group. I had to use it with no handle, so I nabbed it to put a handle on for the next time I needed to use it. (volunteer stuff seems like it is always broken).

    Again, the pics of the actual work were not in the camera..... But no different really from metal turning... I cut a piece of old busted tool handle that was the right diameter almost, chucked it, used a center (see below) and cut it to the diameter with a carbide insert tool that was in the toolholder when I walked up to the lathe, then cut the reduced end diameters to fit the handle.

    Worked fine. I put down a rag on the lathe bed to keep the wood dust off the bed, and did the turning.

    Here's the setup, with the dust still on it, but the tool handle not present. The rag is way below the chuck, it's a 10.6" swing machine (US). You can see the wood dust on the carbide (!) cutter.



    The center I used is one I picked up at a tag sale long ago, it is a wood lathe ball bearing center with an MT2 to fit my tailstock. Perfect for the job.



    The spade was done, varnished, and returned before the camera batteries were charged.






    Last edited by J Tiers; 04-15-2021, 01:07 AM.
    2730

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan


    It's just a box of rain, I don't know who put it there.

  • #2
    I’ve used the metal working tools on wood - as you say, it works fine. Recently I’ve made some tripod quick release plates that I needed ASAP (and didn’t have an appropriate piece of metal stock at hand).

    the only downside is that the wood swarf (worf?) is kind of absorbent AND it can be very fine (dust) and I was worried that it would absorb the oil on the machines & turn to goo. So it was a good excuse to give the machines a good cleaning and reoiling.

    frank

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    • #3
      When I made a custom stock for my target rifle I used the mill with a 30mm ballnose router bit to cut the inletting. Used the mill flat out (4500rpm) Amanda the power feeds. Much nicer than trying to hang on to such a big bit by hand.

      Dave
      Just south of Sudspumpwater UK

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      • #4
        A lot of my woodworking projects have ended up on the mill because table saws and routers just don't have the accuracy I like to see or what I'm used to getting on my metal projects.

        This was one of my hacks......... Didn't have a Forstner bit that would cut .030 over size so I set it up in the boring head. The mill came in handy for indexing keeping the hole spacing perfect.

        Couldn't do that on a drill press, can't mount a boring head in my drill press either.

        JL.................

        Click image for larger version

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        • #5
          How do you guys handle the wood dust, I try and use dust collection, not perfect, do a wipe down of the machine afterwards too.

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          • #6
            Well, I didn't do anything to "handle the dust".... I wasn't going to a lot of trouble to make something to cover the mill before doing this "quickie" project.

            So, I just cleaned up after. Vacuumed the table and the rest of the area, then wiped up any stuff stuck in the oil. For the lathe, the rag over the bed caught pretty much everything.

            I may come up with something for later, since there is at least as much trouble with metal swarf. The metal swarf flies farther and gets into more things. And it is a lot "scratchier", on both things and me.
            2730

            Keep eye on ball.
            Hashim Khan


            It's just a box of rain, I don't know who put it there.

            Comment


            • #7
              Joe Lee That offset of the Forsner bit to make the hole oversize . How did you orientate the cutter with respect to the boring head travel?? Sounds like a GREAT idea.
              ...lew...

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              • #8
                Metal working machine tools, especially CNC mills, are used extensively by musical instrument makers. They have advantages over CNC routers, more versatile, easier to repair, etc, etc. Older Fadal mills became a favorite, partly because Taylor Guitars started using them.

                There is a problem sometimes with metal working machine's spindle rpm, but that's usually made up for by the machine's rigidity.

                I use my relatively low rpm CNC mill in wood all the time. Climb cuts and high end carbide bits give finishes that only need sanding sealer and a touch of fine grit sand paper.

                Dust is not a major issue with CNC, all the major makers still maintain factory warrantees for machines used in woodworking.

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                • #9
                  Nice Hack Joe Lee I will remember that one. I do notice dust gets over a large area in my garage when working with wood so I try to plan accordingly. The precision is a nice benefit of metal tools working wood.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by DennisCA View Post
                    How do you guys handle the wood dust, I try and use dust collection, not perfect, do a wipe down of the machine afterwards too.
                    If I'm doing anything that is creating any amount of dust like in JT's first pic I just hold the shop vac nozzle close to the cutter and that takes care of all of it.

                    JL...............

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Lew Hartswick View Post
                      Joe Lee That offset of the Forsner bit to make the hole oversize . How did you orientate the cutter with respect to the boring head travel?? Sounds like a GREAT idea.
                      ...lew...
                      Lew, I had to orient the slicing / scoring end of the bit to the outer most dia. of the cut. It was easy to visualize setting the location.

                      JL............

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Mike279 View Post
                        Nice Hack Joe Lee I will remember that one. I do notice dust gets over a large area in my garage when working with wood so I try to plan accordingly. The precision is a nice benefit of metal tools working wood.
                        Mike, thanks............ I've never done any extensive wood working where coating the shop in dust was an issue.
                        Holding the shop vac nozzle close to the cutter takes care of almost all of the dust.

                        JL..............

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                        • #13
                          Found the router bits. Sure enough there is one the right shape aside from being only for doing edges.......and so totally useless for the purpose I wanted.

                          I do not know what it fits on, the arbor is MIA, probably never had it. I have several of these larger interchangeable cutters of various shapes in a box, likely from a tag sale. I assume it has a nut on the end of the arbor, but what keeps it from spinning on the arbor? There is nothing other than a couple of nubs on the "nut end" that are maybe 15 thou high.



                          2730

                          Keep eye on ball.
                          Hashim Khan


                          It's just a box of rain, I don't know who put it there.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                            I assume it has a nut on the end of the arbor, but what keeps it from spinning on the arbor? There is nothing other than a couple of nubs on the "nut end" that are maybe 15 thou high.

                            Just friction between the face of the nut and whatever shoulder is on the arbor. With the high speeds of most woodworking cutters, and the ease with which most wood is cut, that’s all that is necessary. You will see diamond arbors on some small circular saws, and pin drive on some sawmill saws, but those are the exception to the rule. You will find that the arbor rotation is always such that the nut is tightened by the resistance of the cutter. Or almost always - shapers, with their reversible rotation, use tabbed washers to prevent the cutter from spinning the nut loose.

                            I’ve never had a woodworking cutter (that I know of) spin on an arbor. And if it did, no problem. You’re feeding by hand, and you’d just stop feeding.

                            On a horizontal mill, cutting metal, it’s a bit different. If I’m just feeding by hand, I might skip the key. Feeding by power I always use a key, because having the cutter stop but the machine continue to feed is likely to bend the arbor or something worse. Exception again - I might skip the key with a thin slitting saw, as I expect the saw blade to shatter before any other damage is done.
                            Last edited by JohnMartin; 04-15-2021, 12:35 PM. Reason: Edited because this damn iPad logged me out before I was done typing. After logging back in, at least most of what I’d typed was able to be restored. Anyone else having that problem?

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                            • #15
                              This is a timely thread as I want to make two wood cases for my loose micrometers. Thank you J Tiers for the ideas! 👍
                              Location: Northern WI

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