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OT: Oscilloscope Purchase

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  • #61
    Originally posted by dhansen View Post

    I have 2 Tektronix 465s that I would sell for $200 plus shipping. I know that one is working but needs some knobs that you could rob from the other one. Not sure about the condition of the second one. I would have to have your advice on the shipping method and packaging so that they would not become damaged.
    That's actually a screaming good deal -- bummer I can't do anything about it at this time.
    25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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    • #62
      Muahahaha. The watching eBay like a hawk finally paid off. Got my isolated handheld.

      Click image for larger version

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      • #63
        Originally posted by eKretz View Post
        Muahahaha. The watching eBay like a hawk finally paid off.
        That's pretty much how I got my entire shop. Took several years tho.
        And the lathe was a hook up from a guy on PM.
        25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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        • #64
          In my case, Craig's List, and estate sales. Shop cost about 10 cents on the dollar, and some work.

          I could have bought better, but I just felt that I had to "earn" the shop. With stuff like that, it feels wrong to just buy new... I learned a heck of a lot from doing it my way, stuff that "checkbook work" does not teach.

          I now need to replace the NiCd pack in the Scopemeter. Would like to find a service manual if possible, but can wing it if not available. I'll be doing a search.
          2730

          Keep eye on ball.
          Hashim Khan

          Everything not impossible is compulsory

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          • #65
            Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
            I now need to replace the NiCd pack in the Scopemeter. Would like to find a service manual if possible, but can wing it if not available. I'll be doing a search.
            I highly recommend looking at "eevBlog" it's a forum like this one, but for electrical engineers... they have several sections and sub-groups who are devoted entirely to repairing and calibrating test gear. Some do it for money, others as a hobby. They are an *extremely* knowledgeable group, and often have access to the OEM documentation. https://www.eevblog.com/forum/testgear/
            25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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            • #66
              good idea.... Thanks.
              2730

              Keep eye on ball.
              Hashim Khan

              Everything not impossible is compulsory

              Comment


              • #67
                Yes, eevBlog is a good group. I am already a member there but have not posted very much. Mostly just a lurker but that may change.



                Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

                I highly recommend looking at "eevBlog" it's a forum like this one, but for electrical engineers... they have several sections and sub-groups who are devoted entirely to repairing and calibrating test gear. Some do it for money, others as a hobby. They are an *extremely* knowledgeable group, and often have access to the OEM documentation. https://www.eevblog.com/forum/testgear/
                Paul A.
                SE Texas

                And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                You will find that it has discrete steps.

                Comment


                • #68
                  Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                  good idea.... Thanks.
                  You might want to do a little extra looking for battery pack projects on youtube too. I've seen a few videos where guys replaced the original NIMH (weren't those NIMH, not NiCd?) battery pack in the 196 and 199 with a Li-ion pack. Might be worth doing. The 190-104 I picked up has a Li-ion battery that's good for 7 hours of no-cord use.

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                  • #69
                    Just FWIW, I replaced the NiCd batteries in my vintage Fluke 8000A multimeter recently. Saved a ton of money in the process just by doing some Googling for an evening. I have a total of $50 in the meter so far. Reason I chose that one is because you can actually *see* the red LED digits in dark industrial environments. Calibration isn't really needed for anything I'm likely to use it for, although it seems to still be OK in that regard.

                    For the fussy work, I still have the new Fluke 117, and a fully rebuilt Simpson 260.
                    25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                    • #70
                      Not replacing with a vastly different technology. Just the same thing that is in there now, be that NiMH, or NiCd. I was told it is NiCd, in a factory sheet I have somewhere, but.........

                      I got no issues doing any of the swapping, as soon as I get into the thing and see the pack, which is a triangular assembly, IIRC from the paper that I "have somewhere".

                      I prefer to use the correct method of accessing, rather than finding out the hard way, but I've done the latter enough not to be afraid of it.

                      I have an 8010 I need to replace the pack in, but it uses a D size NiCd, and my usual sources do not have those any more. The pack is limping along with a "C" size now.
                      2730

                      Keep eye on ball.
                      Hashim Khan

                      Everything not impossible is compulsory

                      Comment


                      • #71
                        Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                        I have an 8010 I need to replace the pack in, but it uses a D size NiCd, and my usual sources do not have those any more. The pack is limping along with a "C" size now.
                        JTiers -
                        this is the exact product that was recommended to me when i did mine:
                        https://power.tenergy.com/tenergy-d-...eable-battery/
                        It worked out great. I made sure to order the type that already has solder tabs.
                        Great company BTW.
                        25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                        • #72
                          That is also a better price than my usual sources.... You are on a roll here! Thanks.
                          2730

                          Keep eye on ball.
                          Hashim Khan

                          Everything not impossible is compulsory

                          Comment


                          • #73
                            Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                            That is also a better price than my usual sources.... You are on a roll here! Thanks.
                            Cool. Watch out for the thing about solder tabs tho -- it isn't an obvious choice until you already select them for the shopping cart, then they give you all the options. When I installed mine, I smashed the tabs lengthwise with a pliers to get them through the PCB hole.
                            25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

                            Comment


                            • #74
                              When I replaced the NiCd cells in my drill battery I discovered that some "C" sized cells are really a "sub-C" size. This was from a name brand (Black and Decker). I used full sized "C" cells in the rebuild and the battery pack lasted for far longer on each charge. Strangely enough I got my full sized "C" cells from a Harbor Freight battery pack for one of their lines of drills. The cells that I harvested from it had the straps welded to them and I simply soldered to those straps. \

                              And those HF battery packs were only about $13 as opposed to well over $40 for the OEM ones with the sub-sized cells. You can't make this stuff up.



                              Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                              Not replacing with a vastly different technology. Just the same thing that is in there now, be that NiMH, or NiCd. I was told it is NiCd, in a factory sheet I have somewhere, but.........

                              I got no issues doing any of the swapping, as soon as I get into the thing and see the pack, which is a triangular assembly, IIRC from the paper that I "have somewhere".

                              I prefer to use the correct method of accessing, rather than finding out the hard way, but I've done the latter enough not to be afraid of it.

                              I have an 8010 I need to replace the pack in, but it uses a D size NiCd, and my usual sources do not have those any more. The pack is limping along with a "C" size now.
                              Paul A.
                              SE Texas

                              And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                              You will find that it has discrete steps.

                              Comment


                              • #75
                                I am almost certain the Fluke 19X batteries are NiMH. I had a 199C for a short while and was considering the Li-ion conversion myself. They are far superior and much longer lasting in my experience. But it is a bit of a job, to be sure, considering some changes need to be made in the charging circuitry to use them with the onboard charger.

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