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A milling attachment for the 9" lathe

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  • #16
    Originally posted by old mart View Post
    As many of the milling attachments for lathes, that one looks about as stiff as a wet noodle.
    The mounting is the worst part. Then maybe the key, and the fit of the tube on the post. The tube is 2 1/2" diameter, big enough to be pretty solid.

    If well made there is no reason it cannot be good.

    It could be an improvement to dispense with the tube, make the post the size of the tube, somewhat enlarge the clamping block, and put the screw up the backside, outside of the post, engaging with the clamp block. Takes a sliding fit out of the equation, as well as the potential looseness of the key. The key would of course be inside the post.

    That way, the key would be out of the picture when the clamping block was clamped.
    3313 5160 4357 4344 3174 9120

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

    Everything not impossible is compulsory

    Birds are NOT real, they are spying on you

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    • #17
      Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

      The mounting is the worst part. Then maybe the key, and the fit of the tube on the post. The tube is 2 1/2" diameter, big enough to be pretty solid.
      Once I got it cleaned up, the tube was 2.358" diameter. It started at 2-3/8" or there about, but it was pretty rough.


      Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
      If well made there is no reason it cannot be good.

      It could be an improvement to dispense with the tube, make the post the size of the tube, somewhat enlarge the clamping block, and put the screw up the backside, outside of the post, engaging with the clamp block. Takes a sliding fit out of the equation, as well as the potential looseness of the key. The key would of course be inside the post.

      That way, the key would be out of the picture when the clamping block was clamped.
      If I follow your description, that sounds similar to the Potts milling attachment (well, minus the spindle): http://www.lathes.co.uk/potts/
      Galaxie
      Senior Member
      Last edited by Galaxie; 04-20-2021, 09:27 PM.
      Location: Northern WI

      Comment


      • #18
        Yeah, adjusts like that, but not a live spindle, using a table or vise. Same as yours, but the "post" is what the clamp goes on directly, and screw is like the Potts.

        The Potts was made to be held down with a t-nut.

        I kinda like the Potts, which I was not familiar with. It would be very good as a live spindle tool, and easy to make.
        3313 5160 4357 4344 3174 9120

        Keep eye on ball.
        Hashim Khan

        Everything not impossible is compulsory

        Birds are NOT real, they are spying on you

        Comment


        • #19
          I am sure that fine work can be done in difficult conditions, as long as the machinist is aware of the limitations of his machinery. Smaller cuts and feeds will achieve the same results, it just takes more patience.

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          • #20
            Well on my 9x19 Grizzly I used the milling attachment I had that never worked worth a darn on my 7x14 machine and made a plate and adapter for this cross slide. Much better, I was able to take a pretty decent cut in an old piece of aluminum I tried.

            Not bad for a refrigeration pipefitter, but I am not from N.J. so I guess not.
            I was going to use my new Klein digital protractor to measure the angle but the plastic was out gassing so.... bad. 😁
            Click image for larger version

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            Retired - Journeyman Refrigeration Pipefitter - Master Electrician

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            • #21
              Th biggest problem I have had with the Palmgren milling attachment is that the part it mounts to (the compound) is quite solid enough for what it normally does, but is not solid enough to hold a large, heavy and off-center milling vise which is bigger than the compound is.

              The mounting is also a fairly thin angle plate, and the pivot is not very tight, even when clamped hard.

              I tend to think that the milling attachment ought to mount to a more solid portion of the lathe, like the crosslide directly. And/or that it ought to probably be used on a considerably heavier machine.

              I do not think that most of the attachments should be used on machines smaller than a 14" or so swing, as that size tends to have a pretty large and heavy carriage assembly. "Large and heavy" is not typically a feature of the 10 inch size machines most have (yes it would be fine on a 10EE, maybe even on a Rockwell).

              The attachments from LA look good, but they seem to require the MLA crosslide to mount. They are massive, and not the sort of thing that would get kicked aside by the cutter, like the kinda heavy, but less solidly mounted Palmgren.
              J Tiers
              Senior Member
              Last edited by J Tiers; 04-22-2021, 11:50 PM.
              3313 5160 4357 4344 3174 9120

              Keep eye on ball.
              Hashim Khan

              Everything not impossible is compulsory

              Birds are NOT real, they are spying on you

              Comment


              • #22
                In my milling adventures on the SB-9 I found that one of the biggest helps was to have the cuts arranged so that the cutting force is directed DOWN. This mimics the cutting force when turning something in the lathe, but instead of the tool being forced down, the item being milled is.

                The SB-9, like most lathes, is built to resist the normal forces of cutting while turning. This force is in a downward direction and the lathe ways are very good at resisting that downward force. An upward force tries to lift the carriage off of the ways and then it is only supported by the clamps on the bottom of the ways, which are often left a bit loose.

                The next thing that helps a lot is taking light cuts. And with a dead sharp milling cutter.



                Originally posted by old mart View Post
                As many of the milling attachments for lathes, that one looks about as stiff as a wet noodle.
                Paul A.
                SE Texas

                And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                You will find that it has discrete steps.

                Comment


                • #23
                  J, My milling table and I assume the similar one that Galaxie made is mounted INSTEAD of the compound, not on it like the Palmgren and similar attachments are. That eliminates a whole lot of problems off the bat. It also frees up the compound to be mounted on a right angle bracket on top of the milling table to give you a vertical movement axis. A small to medium vise can then be mounted on the compound and you have the functional equivalent of the Palmgren style milling attachment, but a lot sturdier. I had planned to do that, but then Grizzly came out with the G0484 and I just had to buy one.



                  Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                  Th biggest problem I have had with the Palmgren milling attachment is that the part it mounts to (the compound) is quite solid enough for what it normally does, but is not solid enough to hold a large, heavy and off-center milling vise which is bigger than the compound is.

                  The mounting is also a fairly thin angle plate, and the pivot is not very tight, even when clamped hard.

                  I tend to think that the milling attachment ought to mount to a more solid portion of the lathe, like the crosslide directly. And/or that it ought to probably be used on a considerably heavier machine.

                  I do not think that most of the attachments should be used on machines smaller than a 14" or so swing, as that size tends to have a pretty large and heavy carriage assembly. "Large and heavy" is not typically a feature of the 10 inch size machines most have (yes it would be fine on a 10EE, maybe even on a Rockwell).

                  The attachments from LA look good, but they seem to require the MLA crosslide to mount. They are massive, and not the sort of thing that would get kicked aside by the cutter, like the kinda heavy, but less solidly mounted Palmgren.
                  Paul A.
                  SE Texas

                  And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                  You will find that it has discrete steps.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    The milling attachment that I had was mounted instead of the compound, and it was still completely inadequate. I'm starting to think that an angle plate mounted on the cross-slide would be better. It's not hard to turn up a dovetail plug (or whatever that thing is called) like the SB uses.
                    25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                      J, My milling table and I assume the similar one that Galaxie made is mounted INSTEAD of the compound, not on it like the Palmgren and similar attachments are. That eliminates a whole lot of problems off the bat. It also frees up the compound to be mounted on a right angle bracket on top of the milling table to give you a vertical movement axis. A small to medium vise can then be mounted on the compound and you have the functional equivalent of the Palmgren style milling attachment, but a lot sturdier. I had planned to do that, but then Grizzly came out with the G0484 and I just had to buy one.
                      Direct mounting is clearly better. It reduces the total number of "sliding joints" in the system, and no sliding joint can ever be as solid as not having it at all.

                      But "solid" is relative. The Palmgren is simply meant for a much larger lathe, where the larger Palmgren works rather well. Palmgren produced a smaller version which was intended for smaller lathes, but the relative weights are out of scale. On a larger lathe, the larger Palmgren is just "an ordinary attachment" which is "put on the compound". On a smaller lathe, the Palmgren is a rather huge "thing" that looks bigger than the carriage, and is overhung off of it.

                      Point being that no matter if it is mounted to the carriage directly, or to the compound, the attachment cannot be better than it's connection to the rest of the machine via it's base. The larger/wider the base, the more solid it is likely to be. A stable, wide base, that may even stand securely with no bolting down, is not going to need the sort of "death grip" by the hold-down system that a narrower and inherently unstable base will. The leverage is far better with the wide base.

                      the Palmgren is an example of this. It sits on the compound, but the main weight of it is hung off the side of the compound, and if not bolted down tightly, cannot even remain set in position. The Palmgren essentially bolts a 2 or 3 inch wide milling or drill press vise to a slide system, and hangs that off the compound

                      The Atlas and Southbend attachments have two advantages.... 1) they can be set in a stable position without bolts, and 2) the "vise" on them is far smaller, lighter, and is in-scale with the sort of size work that is realistic to do.

                      An attachment with a small base, a base that may be just the diameter of the column, with a column many diameters tall, is probably going to still be relatively "floppy". Even the lathe compound usually has as wide a base as can fit on the crosslide, why should a taller milling attachment have a smaller base, when similar forces may be applied to it?

                      The Palmgren in-place. It cannot be mounted closer, or it hits parts of the compound or crosslide, even if the compound is turned.

                      J Tiers
                      Senior Member
                      Last edited by J Tiers; 04-23-2021, 11:35 AM.
                      3313 5160 4357 4344 3174 9120

                      Keep eye on ball.
                      Hashim Khan

                      Everything not impossible is compulsory

                      Birds are NOT real, they are spying on you

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Since we're talking about other milling attachments, I can give a review of the Sherline "Vertical Milling Table". I mounted one to a 1/2" plate to which I bolted a South Bend spigot (a.k.a. dovetail plug). Then I put the whole mess on the cross slide, and bolted a tiny 1" vise to the t-slots. Here are my thoughts on it:

                        Pros:
                        • It operates smoothly and there is a backlash adjustment.
                        • It's easy to mount to any flat surface, all you need is two #10-32 tapped holes.
                        • It has T-slots.
                        • 8" is a good bit of space.
                        Cons:
                        • Aluminum construction means it's not very rigid (speaking the obvious, I know 😃).
                        • The lead screw is only 1/4-20. It feels like it should've had at least a 5/16" thread.
                        • The T-slots are tiny, which means the t-nuts can be somewhat fragile.
                        • Vibration will cause the lead screw to turn. I had to put a clamp across the table to keep it from moving.
                        • Can't set the graduated dial to zero (unless you pay extra).
                        I used to use this setup to slot screw heads on the lathe, and once to mill/drill passages in a 1" x 1" x 2" cast iron steam engine block. It worked fine for that purpose, but anything larger than a 1/8" end mill would probably cause trouble.



                        Any one here ever use a Myford milling attachment?



                        Location: Northern WI

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Galaxie View Post
                          Pros:
                          • It operates smoothly and there is a backlash adjustment.
                          • It's easy to mount to any flat surface, all you need is two #10-32 tapped holes.
                          • It has T-slots.
                          • 8" is a good bit of space.
                          Cons:
                          • Aluminum construction means it's not very rigid (speaking the obvious, I know 😃).
                          • The lead screw is only 1/4-20. It feels like it should've had at least a 5/16" thread.
                          • The T-slots are tiny, which means the t-nuts can be somewhat fragile.
                          • Vibration will cause the lead screw to turn. I had to put a clamp across the table to keep it from moving.
                          • Can't set the graduated dial to zero (unless you pay extra).
                          I used to use this setup to slot screw heads on the lathe, and once to mill/drill passages in a 1" x 1" x 2" cast iron steam engine block. It worked fine for that purpose, but anything larger than a 1/8" end mill would probably cause trouble.



                          Any one here ever use a Myford milling attachment?


                          I wish I could afford the Myford parts, they look quite nice. As it is, I've decided (in the long run) to go with a T-slotted cross slide for my SB.
                          25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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