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BTW - electronic level/protractor

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  • BTW - electronic level/protractor

    "BTW" -> not OT, but not a full-blown topic either

    I got one of these electronic level/protractors a few months ago on a whim - I didn't have a need for it, but it looked cool. It has been so much more useful than I ever expected! For example, yesterday I used it to set a work piece to a 10* inclination on the mill table - without it I would have used some mechanical protractor with much less ease.

    One of these is probably already owned & used by many here, but if you're one of the have-nots, get one!

    Click image for larger version  Name:	51wj6hHazkL._SY90_.jpg Views:	9 Size:	2.9 KB ID:	1939431
    Last edited by Bob Engelhardt; 04-20-2021, 11:27 AM.

  • #2
    Bob, What is accuracy ? +/- 30 minutes for example ?
    Have you compared to a Starrett Level for example ?
    Thanks- never used or worked with one
    Rich
    Green Bay, WI

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Rich Carlstedt View Post
      Bob, What is accuracy ? +/- 30 minutes for example ?
      Have you compared to a Starrett Level for example ?
      Thanks- never used or worked with one
      Rich
      They claim 0.1* (6 minutes) or 0.2* (12 minutes), depending. https://www.kleintools.com/catalog/l...Specifications

      I haven't checked it & I'm not using it to level my lathe, either.

      Also, there are other brands and I don't remember how the Klein compares.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Bob Engelhardt View Post

        I got one of these electronic level/protractors a few months ago on a whim - I didn't have a need for it, but it looked cool. It has been so much more useful than I ever expected! For example, yesterday I used it to set a work piece to a 10* inclination on the mill table - without it I would have used some mechanical protractor with much less ease.
        Maybe use a ten degree angle block??

        Comment


        • #5
          The ones I have seen were abysmally inaccurate, with coarse gradations. Akin to a carpenter's level.

          It is possible to have one that is extremely accurate, but that costs money.
          2730

          Keep eye on ball.
          Hashim Khan


          It's just a box of rain, I don't know who put it there.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post

            Maybe use a ten degree angle block??
            You assume too much.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
              It is possible to have one that is extremely accurate, but that costs money.
              Wyler
              https://store.gaging.com/products/pr...els/blue-level

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              • #8
                I have a Tilt Box II that gets used quite a bit. It claims + or - 0.2 degrees of accuracy. It seems to be better than that, although I have never tried to quantify it. It is accurate enough for all but high precision work. Made by the Beall Tool Company. I think it was around $50. Worth it to me. I have piles of angle blocks, sine bars and plates, Jo blocks, etc. This is quicker and easier for most things.
                Last edited by Toolguy; 04-20-2021, 12:36 PM.
                Kansas City area

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Bob Engelhardt View Post

                  You assume too much.
                  No, I don't assume anything.
                  I didn't suggest sine bar and Jo blocks...
                  Angle plates, 30-60-90 and 45-90-45 triangles, just basic equipment.

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                  • #10
                    Perhaps associated or perhaps not but I downloaded a "bubble level" app for my phone a few months back. I was shocked that it read to 0.1°. For giggles I tested it on a plate with a jacking screw and it did in fact sense 1/10° changes and within a small angle on the screw was able to go back and forth and read the changes with amazing accuracy.

                    Of course the back and edges of my phone case can't be trusted to be or stay flat or straight. So it's a level of accuracy that is limited by the physical shape of the phone and case.

                    If I go onto Amazon I find that there's a whole lot of sub $40 options for digital angle gauges that are showing two decimal places on the readouts. Even if the second decimal is not to be trusted I suspect we can manage to use it to make sure that the 10th's are accurate.

                    I think I'm going to add one to my next Amazon buying spree....
                    Chilliwack BC, Canada

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                      The ones I have seen were abysmally inaccurate, with coarse gradations. Akin to a carpenter's level.

                      It is possible to have one that is extremely accurate, but that costs money.
                      You mean the display resolution is coarse? If so, 0.1* is fine enough for me, but YMMV, of course. A bubble level's resolution is all in the user's eye: "OK, bubble is centered", "Bubble is just touching the left line", "the bubble's edge is just over the line", etc. Very coarse display resolution (doesn't mean inaccurate).

                      My using a machining example was probably a poor choice. It is a poor substitute for a machinist's level, but a very good one for a carpenter's level. On the other hand, I don't machine to tenths, so it works for the machining that I do.
                      Last edited by Bob Engelhardt; 04-20-2021, 12:48 PM.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post

                        No, I don't assume anything.
                        I didn't suggest sine bar and Jo blocks...
                        Angle plates, 30-60-90 and 45-90-45 triangles, just basic equipment.
                        You assumed that I have angle blocks which I do not. And even if I had them I would used the electronic protractor for its ease of use.
                        Last edited by Bob Engelhardt; 04-20-2021, 01:29 PM.

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                        • #13
                          That's Stefan territory (1 micron per meter)!
                          Last edited by Bob Engelhardt; 04-20-2021, 06:58 PM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Bob Engelhardt View Post
                            You mean the display resolution is coarse? If so, 0.1* is fine enough for me, but YMMV, of course. A bubble level's resolution is all in the user's eye: "OK, bubble is centered", "Bubble is just touching the left line", "the bubble's edge is just over the line", etc. Very coarse display resolution (doesn't mean inaccurate)....................
                            That's exactly what I meant.

                            But you forgot a few "measurements" in your example...... "bubble moved a bit to the left", for instance. You may have NO idea by how much it moved, but you can see it did, which means there was a change.

                            The coarse gradation, or "resolution" means that you will not see any movement with the "digital" level unless it is, on average, a bit over half a "unit". That ability to see a change, even not a measured change, is something that is useful even with a carpenter's level, and can be more important than knowing a "number of degrees" of angle.
                            2730

                            Keep eye on ball.
                            Hashim Khan


                            It's just a box of rain, I don't know who put it there.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Bob Engelhardt View Post

                              That's Stephan territory (1 micron per meter)!
                              I do not know what a Stephan is.
                              However people crave accuracy it appears, nearly every post in this thread is about accuracy, if you want it then buy it, if the cost is to high then do without (-:

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