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  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Originally posted by PStechPaul View Post
    My first vehicles had carburetors, and all were fairly reliable. I rebuilt several of them, even though they may not have needed it.
    When I rebuilt the carburetor in my 1972 Toyota, I found the high and low speed jets were reversed. It ran much better when that was corrected
    Same kind of experience here. The thing I like about the older tech is (for example) if the fuel pump goes, you could still get home. Not so with EFI. Same for ignitions: if a computer module goes, you're dead in the water and will need expensive parts. With points you still have the possibility of running. IMHO the new tech is wonderful in some ways especially the body and paint, interior etc. But the mechanicals are somewhat more fragile and less redundant nowadays IMHO. Certainly they run cleaner, but what good does that do you if it doesn't run and your next paycheck is 4 days away?

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  • PStechPaul
    replied
    My first vehicles had carburetors, and all were fairly reliable. I rebuilt several of them, even though they may not have needed it. I had a 1966 Honda motorcycle, then a 1960 Ford Falcon (144-6 2sp auto), 1965 Chevy Malibu (230-6 3sp manual, 1960 Ford Econoline (200-6 3sp manual), 1966 Ford Econoline (with engine from 1960 van), 1970 Honda Motorcycle (350 5sp), 1967 Plymouth Valiant (225-slant 6 3sp manual). 1972 Toyota Corolla (1600-4 4sp manual), 1977 Toyota Corolla (1200-4 4sp manual), 1982 Toyota longbed pickup (4 cyl 5sp manual), and 1986 Isuzu Trooper (4 cyl 5sp manual). My first fuel-injected vehicle was my present 1989 Toyota pickup 4WD (4 cyl 5sp manual), then a 1978 Saturn SW1 (totaled in driveway), 1998 Saturn SL1 (also totaled in driveway), 1999 Saturn SL1 (frame rusted out). All were small 4 cyl 5sp manual.And then my present 2009 Honda Fit (in the shop, still). All vehicle engines were reliable enough, whether carbureted or fuel injected.

    When I rebuilt the carburetor in my 1972 Toyota, I found the high and low speed jets were reversed. It ran much better when that was corrected

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  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
    Dan, you better make that the last 3 or 40 years, and even then if it diicey.

    I had a (very good, BTW) car from around 1970, which was carburetor, distributor spark ignition, and had NO computer. Very few had anything else.
    Same here: dead nuts reliability in 1970 for me. HEI ignition (transistor pkg in the distributor), carburetor (which I tuned for my local area and altitude). Sold it finally in 1996 with almost 255k on the clock. It was nice not needing a parts store very often. Because it was owner-servicable.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Dan, you better make that the last 3 or 40 years, and even then if it diicey.

    I had a (very good, BTW) car from around 1970, which was carburetor, distributor spark ignition, and had NO computer. Very few had anything else.

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  • rmcphearson
    replied
    I have the utmost confidence in Tesla considering the founder:
    1) Said his "biggest inspiration is Kanye West, and I fully support his campaign for president"
    2) Tried to screw his loyal customers by claiming a faulty defroster was not a safety feature
    3) Promised ventilators to terrified health care providers, then delivered a prototype made from car parts as advertising
    4) Named is child (from his 10th marriage I think) R2D2

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  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Originally posted by danlb View Post

    But when you claim transportation that uses 100 year old tech, what could that possibly be? A 1921 Model T, perhaps? A 1921 ranger bicycle, complete with acetylene tank to power the "headlamp" perhaps? You can't buy a car made in the last 50 years that does not have improved suspension and running gear as well as superb ignition and fuel management.

    Dan
    What I mean by "100 yr old tech" is, a car with an internal combustion engine, operated entirely by a human who is hopefully awake and not on drugs. (I would quibble on the fuel management, as I had *very* good luck with GM carburetors with regards to reliability) Granted the HEI electonic ignition was a vast improvement over points.

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  • danlb
    replied
    Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
    Meanwhile I will stick with my very old 100-yr old and proven tech. Fortunately my new job (as of last year) does not require me to drive so much. Previously I was averaging 80 miles/128 km per day. Not any more. Now is more like 2 miles/3km per day.
    Not being argumentative, but I hear similar lamenting from my mom. She drives a 2010 Cadillac because she does not like the new technology. Mom wants "trusted technology" but she still wants the 10,000 miles or more between service. She also uses the "miles remaining" on the digital display as a gas gauge. She has no idea how many computers there are in her car but she knows that she does not want a "new fancy one".

    But when you claim transportation that uses 100 year old tech, what could that possibly be? A 1921 Model T, perhaps? A 1921 ranger bicycle, complete with acetylene tank to power the "headlamp" perhaps? You can't buy a car made in the last 50 years that does not have improved suspension and running gear as well as superb ignition and fuel management.



    Dan

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post

    I know and that really is a good thing (when it's up and running)

    in fact they lead the nation in doing so - so in that respect kudos although im sure allot will disagree with that...
    Iowa is likely not far behind.

    But that is a case of hunting where the deer are. If you want wind powered generators, you must go to places where there is a lot of wind. Texas has it. Iowa has it, some other places are not so well provided with wind in good locations.

    So it is not as if they SOUGHT to have wind turbines, they just have the place where such things work, and they were not "on it" early enough to ban them. Other similarly oriented areas have active campaigns going to ban wind turbines altogether.

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  • vectorwarbirds
    replied
    Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

    All of the reports I have seen online have led me to think that somebody is lying like crazy. The "autopilot" cannot function without a driver in the seat, nor without lane markings. And no, it doesn't take that long to put out a battery fire, nor did it take that long. They had the bulk of it out in 15 minutes. I think, but cannot prove, that it may have been a suicide pact, or a murder-suicide. I'm sure the authorities are not being completely up-front about their findings, and I am equally sure that Tesla is not being completely up-front either.

    Meanwhile I will stick with my very old 100-yr old and proven tech. Fortunately my new job (as of last year) does not require me to drive so much. Previously I was averaging 80 miles/128 km per day. Not any more. Now is more like 2 miles/3km per day.
    More research eh?

    https://jalopnik.com/consumer-report...uto-1846739330

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  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
    Texas produces 25% of its power from renewable energy you know...
    I know and that really is a good thing (when it's up and running)

    in fact they lead the nation in doing so - so in that respect kudos although im sure allot will disagree with that...

    Leave a comment:


  • mattthemuppet
    replied
    Texas produces 25% of its power from renewable energy you know...

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    Texas is a "red" state, but is not so backward as to have no charging stations. And anyone can put one in their house. It seems that the owner lived there. I'd bet you can even buy a Prius there, despite the "Prius repellent".

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  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
    well that went south quickly....

    at least Doozer always has something interesting to say, even if it's occasionally delivered with the grace of a brick through a window
    I know right -- it's like "wow that escalated quickly" and all this from a tesla that crashed in texas,,, which begs the question --- how did they even get the damn car charged up in that state in the first place??? was it from out of state?


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  • mattthemuppet
    replied
    well that went south quickly....

    at least Doozer always has something interesting to say, even if it's occasionally delivered with the grace of a brick through a window

    Leave a comment:


  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Don't make me sick the Dooze on you two - you think im being a little too real I guarantee you both will think im totally pleasant after that guy gets done with you....

    Leave a comment:

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