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  • #16
    Seems I have an inordinate amount of CCC around here. I call it Wuhanium.
    thx.

    Comment


    • #17
      There is a world of a difference between a hoarder and a collector/ hobbyist.
      The hoarder keeps everything,rubbish scrap and all.
      The collector/ hobbyist deliberately buys keeps, safely stores, maybe labels, items which he or she wants to support their hobby. , even if not immediately being required
      .The collector/hobbyist will happily exchange items with other folk whereas hoarders will not let anything at all out of their grasp. Hoarders let their hoards rule their lives
      , Collector/Hobbyists regard their stuff as a means to happily enhance their lives.
      We are surrounded by our collections, our home is reasonably clean, everything works, repairs are done immediately.
      It is not at all unusual for a dolls house or a model steam engine to sit on our kitchen table for a while when we are contemplating changes or improvements, but they soon get returned to their proper places.
      Regards David Powell.

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by I make chips View Post
        Seems I have an inordinate amount of CCC around here. I call it Wuhanium.
        thx.
        Suit yourself. There are reasons, such as more people interested in the hobby than old machines in decent condition. Or, wanting to do the hobby, and not make a hobby of fixing your tools.

        I do not have to do that (and I do not) but I understand the motivation to go with CCC.
        2730

        Keep eye on ball.
        Hashim Khan


        It's just a box of rain, I don't know who put it there.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by junkaddict View Post
          ...I should have picked bird watching as my golden years hobby...
          I chuckled when I read that. I'm a pretty avid birdwatcher; have been for decades. For years I have gotten by
          with relatively cheap equipment but at long last I have reached a point where I can afford some better stuff.
          About 6 months ago I spent nearly $3000 on a really good pair of binoculars (Swarovski EL 8.5 x 42) and then
          a couple months later I bought a Meade spotting scope for about $450.

          After using the Meade for a while I realized that, while it was a pretty good scope for what it cost me but it just
          wasn't as good as I needed for low light situations. Consequently last week I just spent a little over $3000 on
          a new and improved spotting scope (Kowa TSN 773 77mm x 25-60 zoom). Of course the scope sits on a $300
          tripod and, because I'm getting older and have less endurance I need a decent folding stool ($100 plus) to pack
          along.

          I have a library of books on nature and birds that I have accumulated over the years but of course, as with any
          science, many changes have occurred so in order to have current information I have to buy new books (and they
          certainly are more expensive today than they were 30 years ago). Amazon really likes me these days.

          My wife and I also feed birds in our backyard so we have a collection of feeders. And have you checked out the
          cost of bird seed these days? A 40 lb. bag of black oils sunflower seeds is only about 25 bucks but when you
          feed year round and go through a bag every three weeks it adds up. Those little cakes of suet only last so long
          as well.

          Don;t get me started on nature photography. A good DSLR can cost anywhere from $1000 to $2500 and the lenses,
          holy crap! If you want to take "good" wildlife photos you need good 500mm or 600mm with large apertures. Decent
          Nikon or Canon Zoom lenses in this range can easily cost more than $10,000. I don't intend to go this route myself
          but I have friends who have spent that kind of money.

          If you're out in the elements a lot you need good gear, too. Checked out the prices of brand name Gore-tex jackets
          lately? And good boots and fleece jackets for those cold days sure make things more comfortable. It's no fun
          sitting in the rain getting cold and wet.

          The wife and I are also considering buying a small RV so we can hit some of those special places where people go
          to birdwatch. And don't forget the tours. If you read the birding magazines you'll quickly see that there area plethora
          of tours to exotic, and not so exotic, places. Prices can run from $1000 up depending on the package. I've got my
          eye on a couple that we might consider when this Covid thing is finally over and the Canada/US border opens up.

          Don't think for a minute that "any" hobby can't become a money pit...




          Keith
          __________________________
          Just one project too many--that's what finally got him...

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by LKeithR View Post
            Don't think for a minute that "any" hobby can't become a money pit...
            One of the common sayings on a motorcycle racing forum I frequent is that if you can't afford to go racing take up knitting. I find that hilarious as my wife has spent more money on knitting machines, yarn, and other things related to knitting than I ever did on racing bikes lol. Of course, she's made more money from knitting than I did racing so she's got me there

            Any hobby can get expensive.

            Comment


            • #21
              Back in my club level car racing days one racer had "Team NSF" and "Sponsored by VISA" on their car....
              Chilliwack BC, Canada

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by BCRider View Post
                Back in my club level car racing days one racer had "Team NSF" and "Sponsored by VISA" on their car....
                More than a few guys I know have thanked visa, mastercard and their bank during a podium speech lol

                Comment


                • #23
                  I sent the mrs to take a van load of scrap to the scrapyard, as one does!, she came back with more weight than she went with, which was funny, amongst other things she dragged a mint brooks anvil and base stand home!, I was completely surprised by that, her and her sister lugging a bloody anvil home.
                  I still use it, best thing since sliced bread.
                  she’s lucky I guess, found a fairly good flat bar bender, I’m not so lucky, but what we see as gold is rusty crap to 99% of the population
                  were in a minority
                  mark

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Dan Dubeau View Post

                    More than a few guys I know have thanked visa, mastercard and their bank during a podium speech lol
                    LOL Yeah, I read ya loud and clear.

                    I kept the costs down as cheap as anyone around and every day of motorcycle racing or track day averaged around $350. So a two day race weekend would be $700. And I know that this is low by almost any possible comparison. Plus it was in the late 90's and early 2000's. Costs have certainly gone up since then I'm sure.

                    But starting out at the ripe age of 48 my highly tuned and long practiced "Sense of Self Preservation" kept me slow enough that my tires lasted at first for around 10 track days. This quickly went to 8 days. And towards the end of my six years of club playing I had gotten down to 6 days. That was a big part of holding my costs in check. That and the 1992 CBR600F2 didn't have enough power to shred them much faster anyway. It was a very highly friendly bike to ride though. I couldn't have picked a better one other than perhaps an SV650.

                    Fun times.... fun times.....
                    Chilliwack BC, Canada

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by BCRider View Post

                      LOL Yeah, I read ya loud and clear.

                      I kept the costs down as cheap as anyone around and every day of motorcycle racing or track day averaged around $350. So a two day race weekend would be $700. And I know that this is low by almost any possible comparison. Plus it was in the late 90's and early 2000's. Costs have certainly gone up since then I'm sure.

                      But starting out at the ripe age of 48 my highly tuned and long practiced "Sense of Self Preservation" kept me slow enough that my tires lasted at first for around 10 track days. This quickly went to 8 days. And towards the end of my six years of club playing I had gotten down to 6 days. That was a big part of holding my costs in check. That and the 1992 CBR600F2 didn't have enough power to shred them much faster anyway. It was a very highly friendly bike to ride though. I couldn't have picked a better one other than perhaps an SV650.

                      Fun times.... fun times.....
                      I sprint raced an 97F3, and also a endurance raced few different Sv650s. Sounds like we had similar experiences although a decade apart (I quit in 2012). I did it as cheap as I could, but the costs were still about $1000/ weekend running a sprint bike and endurance bike with a set of tires a weekend. I could get 1-2 weekends on a set with my F3 sprint bike, but would be into a new set every round for the endurance sv. When we got the rc-51 shown in my avatar, things got even more expensive. That was a very fun bike, but more expensive to run than the sv for sure. If I was chasing class championships I'd throw new tires on more frequently. In for a penny, in for a pound....

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by LKeithR View Post

                        I chuckled when I read that. I'm a pretty avid birdwatcher; have been for decades. For years I have gotten by
                        with relatively cheap equipment but at long last I have reached a point where I can afford some better stuff.
                        About 6 months ago I spent nearly $3000 on a really good pair of binoculars (Swarovski EL 8.5 x 42) and then
                        a couple months later I bought a Meade spotting scope for about $450.

                        After using the Meade for a while I realized that, while it was a pretty good scope for what it cost me but it just
                        wasn't as good as I needed for low light situations. Consequently last week I just spent a little over $3000 on
                        a new and improved spotting scope (Kowa TSN 773 77mm x 25-60 zoom). Of course the scope sits on a $300
                        tripod and, because I'm getting older and have less endurance I need a decent folding stool ($100 plus) to pack
                        along.

                        I have a library of books on nature and birds that I have accumulated over the years but of course, as with any
                        science, many changes have occurred so in order to have current information I have to buy new books (and they
                        certainly are more expensive today than they were 30 years ago). Amazon really likes me these days.

                        My wife and I also feed birds in our backyard so we have a collection of feeders. And have you checked out the
                        cost of bird seed these days? A 40 lb. bag of black oils sunflower seeds is only about 25 bucks but when you
                        feed year round and go through a bag every three weeks it adds up. Those little cakes of suet only last so long
                        as well.

                        Don;t get me started on nature photography. A good DSLR can cost anywhere from $1000 to $2500 and the lenses,
                        holy crap! If you want to take "good" wildlife photos you need good 500mm or 600mm with large apertures. Decent
                        Nikon or Canon Zoom lenses in this range can easily cost more than $10,000. I don't intend to go this route myself
                        but I have friends who have spent that kind of money.

                        If you're out in the elements a lot you need good gear, too. Checked out the prices of brand name Gore-tex jackets
                        lately? And good boots and fleece jackets for those cold days sure make things more comfortable. It's no fun
                        sitting in the rain getting cold and wet.

                        The wife and I are also considering buying a small RV so we can hit some of those special places where people go
                        to birdwatch. And don't forget the tours. If you read the birding magazines you'll quickly see that there area plethora
                        of tours to exotic, and not so exotic, places. Prices can run from $1000 up depending on the package. I've got my
                        eye on a couple that we might consider when this Covid thing is finally over and the Canada/US border opens up.

                        Don't think for a minute that "any" hobby can't become a money pit...



                        My son has 4 humming bird feeders that he cleans and refills every three days, and a couple bird baths going in the yard. He did have a feeder, but it was attracting rats in addition to birds. Had a hummingbird nest right outside the bathroom window last year. That was awesome to witness. Birds are pretty damn interesting to watch. I was sitting on the back porch one day watching the doves in the bath, and a Coopers Hawk dropped out of nowhere and nabbed one. And crows, while they have an annoying caw, those birds are super clever.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          I tend to see value in all sorts of what most people would consider "junk". I was glad to have found the end bell of the 36 VDC motor that had disintegrated on my battery powered B&D mower, because it still had some carbon brushes that I think I can cut down and use to repair my B&D drill mentioned in a separate thread. But then I went looking for other smaller motors from various failed power tools, and I think I may have actually thrown them out! So I took apart a Homelite AC powered string trimmer that I still had in a junk pile, with the intention of possibly using its brushes instead. But now I'm thinking about using the motor for some purpose, and instead I may cannibalize some old cheap 12V battery powered drills, perhaps to use their brushes.

                          I went to use a DeWalt power screwdriver that had two 7.2V NiCad battery packs that I had charged up about a year ago, but they were totally depleted, with all 6 cells shorted or reading only a few mV. So I thought I could fit 6 AA NiMH cells in the case, but it doesn't look like they'd fit, and I'd probably need to buy some more to repair both battery packs. If I did that, I'd be spending more than if I just bought a new (or nearly new) tool at a yard sale (which is where this set came from). And, really, I can just as well use portable drills for the purpose, although they are heavier and clumsier. I just hate to throw something out if it has any chance of being repaired or repurposed.

                          Perhaps I am cursed by having lots of storage space in my two houses, as well as three or four sheds, and 2-1/2 acres of land where I can store "stuff" under a tarp or in additional storage sheds I could build. I'm actually now in the process of building an 8' x 8' shed for my various mowers and one of my lawn tractors (also in project form). I often get inspired thinking about completing some of these projects, but then when it comes down to it I only have energy to spend a couple hours on them, and never seem to finish. However, I am hoping to knock off a few simple projects, and then perhaps actually finish one or two more major undertakings.

                          The problem is, perhaps, that I don't actually need most of the things I'm working on, so my main reason for pursuing them is really the process itself, and not the final goal of completion. I don't need any additional income, as everything is paid for and my social security is enough for necessities such as food, utilities, and property taxes.
                          http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                          Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                          USA Maryland 21030

                          Comment


                          • #28

                            Originally posted by LKeithR View Post
                            I chuckled when I read that. I'm a pretty avid birdwatcher; have been for decades.
                            Not something I know much about so thanks for the account.

                            What I do know it its big. Most people are surprised to learn the economy for bird watching in the US is larger than all of professional sports (80 billion vs 71 billion). I wonder how the later will fair.....I mean with sports absence due to Covid, you'd think a lot of people would be asking "why exactly was it we gave a crap about this?" Then again, there's a lot couch potatoes out there.
                            Last edited by Mcgyver; 05-09-2021, 03:51 PM.
                            in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              I helped the wife of a friend who passed away clean out his wood shop the past 2 weekends. We filled a 20 yard dumpster with junk and I took his collection of scrap metal to the scrap yard. Lots of copper at $3.60 a pound and we got $2431 for the metal! Covered the $600 for the dumpster.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                The only crack I've ever tried is of the split tail design.
                                Yes, this hobby really draws you in. I lost my hobby metal shop in the Camp fire. My wife and I have moved on.
                                My new shop is full of nice equipment. 1970 Clausing Colchester lathe, Full size Sharp mill, Brown and Sharpe 618 Micromaster. Lots of new and used equipment..
                                Once you hit $75,000 you start feeling like there is light at the end of the tunnel.
                                This has been my experience anyway.

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