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How do I cut this stuff?

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  • Plain ol Bill
    replied
    Farmed it out to a local shop with a big band saw. Cost $$ but got to get it cut somehow. Didn't have a clue where I could find anyone that had a lathe that could handle 5 1/2" round stock 21 ft long close to me.

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  • 754
    replied
    Is it cut yet ?

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  • Doc Nickel
    replied
    According to This Old Tony, the "One Inch Kung Fu Punch" should slice off a piece neat as you please.

    YouTube wouldn't lie to me, right?

    Doc.

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  • Astronowanabe
    replied
    what I have done is leave it in the forge for a good while then anneal in a barrel of ashes

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  • Arcane
    replied
    Originally posted by strokersix View Post
    Oxy/fuel cutting torch then clean it up with an angle grinder. Ugly but effective.

    My abrasive chop saw would have a tough time getting through something that big. Have to take several bites at it. It would be my first choice though.
    Yeah, large diameter stock is always cut...rotate slightly...cut...rotate some more...ad nauseam.

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  • strokersix
    replied
    Oxy/fuel cutting torch then clean it up with an angle grinder. Ugly but effective.

    My abrasive chop saw would have a tough time getting through something that big. Have to take several bites at it. It would be my first choice though.

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  • akajun
    replied
    take it to a water jet shop,

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  • Fasttrack
    replied
    What tools do you have available? If you don't have a suitable lathe for Black Forrest's suggestion, then I will add another vote for an abrasive cut off wheel. If you're into smithing, you probably have an angle grinder and a thin cut off wheel is cheap at any big box store if you don't already have them. A piece of paper taped around the rod as suggested by eric_h will help you cut square if you're not comfortable eyeballing it.

    Alternatively, you can use an abrasive chop saw (I've got a $50 one from Harbor Freight... purchased in 2005 and it still works for the odd job I throw at it). I've cut large sections of hardened material on it before and it's somewhat slow going but its effective and cheap (compared to buying a lathe, that is!).

    Finally, I agree with epicfail48 that annealing it and it would be a good idea, regardless of how you choose to cut it. I'd be considered about spallation as well.

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  • Black Forest
    replied
    Hello Bill, It sounds as if you got a hold of some hydraulic cylinder rod. I use that stuff all the time in my shop. I have a friend that owns a hydraulic shop and he gives me all I want for free. I use a carbide insert parting blade to cut to length. If you have a lathe that will hold the rod then go for it. For a 2" diameter rod I usually do 800rpm with a feed rate of .97mm per rev. Cuts like butter.

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  • epicfail48
    replied
    Answer is always the same for cutting hardened materials: abrasive cutting*. Cut-off wheels will go through pretty much anything, at varying rates, probably the most cost-effective way to get the job done for most people. Personally though, i like Benteds method best, use a carbide parting tool to get through the hardened layer, then switch to a saw. Carbide tools will go through hardened steel fairly well, though it kills tools not designed specifically for the task pretty fast. Course, that method requires you to have a lathe large enough to hold your piece

    Dunno that id want to use case-hardened stock for an anvil though, seems to me that having only the edges hardened would be asking for some fairly dramatic spalling to happen. Personally, id whack the entire thing into a big fire and leave it there until the fire burns out to anneal it. Hardening can be done later if needed

    *same answer for most people anyways

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  • eric_h
    replied
    Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
    And hope you can cut real straight all the way around with it and wide enough or the sides of the hardened part will take the set out of the teeth.

    JL...........
    That's trivial. Wrap a piece of paper around the round so it lines up and mark the line.
    It's an exercise left to the reader to choose the appropriate cutoff disc. What you don't want to do is use a 1/4 inch grinding disk because that's what's on your tool.

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  • JoeLee
    replied
    Originally posted by eric_h View Post
    Angle grinder with a thin cutoff disc until you get to the unhardened portion, then back to the bandsaw.
    And hope you can cut real straight all the way around with it and wide enough or the sides of the hardened part will take the set out of the teeth.

    JL...........

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  • Bented
    replied
    I do a recurring job on ball screw stock, they are cased about .1" below the minor thread diameter.
    Cut a groove with a carbide parting tool through the case slightly longer then the finish length, give the grooved stock to the saw operator for final cutting.

    This is tough on parting inserts but faster and cheaper then buggering up a bunch of $200.00 bandsaw blades.

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  • redlee
    replied
    Carbide bandsaw blade.

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  • eric_h
    replied
    Angle grinder with a thin cutoff disc until you get to the unhardened portion, then back to the bandsaw.

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