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  • #46
    Originally posted by dian View Post
    i thought it might have had a purpose commming to the forum with your achievement and you would be glad to discuss a relevant topic and explain it to others. but it seems i have rather inconvenienced you.
    Well this was a "What did you do Today" post that was extended into a full thread following Doc's Initiative under the format of RustyBolt's "I retired" thread. It seems like it was well received, and I appreciated all the kind words and advice from the forum members.

    You seem to be the only one that assumed I was looking for test questions...

    If this actually a question you need answered, why not start a new thread explaining your project and what you need to know. Or better still on an engineering forum. Then many of the professional engineers on this site or another can chime in and give their opinion. Surely that would be better than the answer from one 23 y/o who may or may not know his stuff, right?? You are looking for an answer to your question right?
    21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
    1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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    • #47
      MB, I like the cut of your jib. And congrats!

      -js
      There are no stupid questions. But there are lots of stupid answers. This is the internet.

      Location: SF Bay Area

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      • #48
        Originally posted by Steve Steven View Post
        I assume you have done the EIT already, if not do it as soon as you can. I didn't, and had to do it 15 years after I graduated, it was hard. Took the PE soon after and it wasn't as hard as I was schooled up already.

        Steve
        Excellent advice. Some employers will discourage their new hires from becoming PEs, presumably because their time typically becomes more expensive. These tend to be the companies where all the design work winds up on the one PEs desk and he or she is basically expected to just go through and rubber stamp all the drawings. So I know some guys who have intentionally avoided becoming a PE because they wanted to stay in on the action, so to speak but if you want to get your PE, the sooner you start that processes the better.


        Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post
        Congratulations....now the real learning starts
        Indeed! My best electrical engineer right now has a degree in mechanical engineering. He doesn't use anything he learned in school! We say, you get a degree to prove you're capable of learning and that's about it.

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        • #49
          Originally posted by Fasttrack View Post
          Indeed! My best electrical engineer right now has a degree in mechanical engineering. He doesn't use anything he learned in school! We say, you get a degree to prove you're capable of learning and that's about it.
          I've got three I hired out of school. The best one who's become a key person thought a hidden line on a drawing meant it was a guy wire when he first came here. Doesn't mean he's stupid or the schooling was band - quite the contrary (he's brilliant) in both cases but different things are taught there.

          I've also had several engineering students on co-ops. They love it. As a small business, everyone here is important. They're given something, design it, draw it, buy materials, are given shlt by the fitter or welder when can't understand the drawing ..... they deal with whatever comes up and get treated like adults. Responsibility is thrust upon them.....and they respond. Meanwhile their buddies are in the back room off the back room of the Japanese car company proof reading a safety procedure manual. Its very rewarding actually, as corny as it sounds, you watch kids turn into confident young men.

          like any profession, challenging academic programs crams lots of good stuff in your brain but you need that residency, articling or whatever you want to call it before you're admitted to the profession.
          Last edited by Mcgyver; 05-10-2021, 10:16 AM.
          in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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          • #50
            Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post

            Its very rewarding actually, as corny as it sounds, you watch kids turn into confident young men.

            like any profession, challenging school crams lots of good stuff in your brain but you need that residency, articling or whatever you want to call it before you're admitted to the profession.
            Couldn't agree more. When I'm hiring, I always look for candidates that have had that kind of "real world" experience. For MEs, working with machinists or welders and seeing the consequences of stupid tolerancing, etc. is incredibly valuable. I'm feel very fortunate to have pieced together a group of a really talented young engineers to form a dedicated engineering department for my business unit. Before that, I nothing but Ph.D.s in physics and chemistry. Many of them with degrees from top tier schools like MIT, Stanford, Harvard, etc., all bright guys but my gosh... some of them really fell into that stereotype of having no common sense!

            And, to be fair, I've got one guy who has been promoted to an engineering track despite the fact that he has a high school diploma and no college education. But he's smart, hardworking, and has plenty of on-the-job experience / education. He can give any new grad a run for their money.

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            • #51
              Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post

              I've got three I hired out of school. The best one who's become a key person thought a hidden line on a drawing meant it was a guy wire when he first came here. Doesn't mean he's stupid or the schooling was band - quite the contrary (he's brilliant) in both cases but different things are taught there.

              I've also had several engineering students on co-ops. They love it. As a small business, everyone here is important. They're given something, design it, draw it, buy materials, are given shlt by the fitter or welder when can't understand the drawing ..... they deal with whatever comes up and get treated like adults. Responsibility is thrust upon them.....and they respond. Meanwhile their buddies are in the back room off the back room of the Japanese car company proof reading a safety procedure manual. Its very rewarding actually, as corny as it sounds, you watch kids turn into confident young men.

              like any profession, challenging academic programs crams lots of good stuff in your brain but you need that residency, articling or whatever you want to call it before you're admitted to the profession.
              Best advice to a new grad is to take a job with either a smaller company, or a small division of a larger company. Generally super experience, as mentioned, what you do is your project, and you solve the problems, you get it finished, and maybe you get it into production-ready form working with the factory folks.

              In a larger company, yes, you can end up proofing a manual, or spending 5 years keeping up with engineering changes to the upper outboard hinge bolt of the left side stabilizer trim tab.

              CNC machines only go through the motions

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              • #52
                Originally posted by Fasttrack View Post

                Couldn't agree more. When I'm hiring, I always look for candidates that have had that kind of "real world" experience. .
                These kids btw all came through a robotics team we contribute to....they fit the profile you and others mention; personal interest, technical aptitude, problem solving experience etc.
                in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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                • #53
                  A very worthwhile endeavor.
                  May you enjoy going to work throughout your career.

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                  • #54
                    Congrats on your ME degree. I taught a class ( engineering certificate ) for UCLA. One of the student was a Auto mechanic prior to becoming an engineer. We talked about how important it is to be hands on. He is now ( 4 years later ) a project manager at Northrop Grumman. His passion and hands on experience in the real world made a difference.

                    I worked there for 25 years and we could see the down trend of engineers that never changed a bike flat or car battery. You ARE ahead of the rest having a machining background.

                    Be a team player and pick your battles! One thing I have learned from teaching. There are educated people... and just smart people in the world. Best of luck with all you do !

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                    • #55
                      When I watched your videos on the old drill press I knew you were in engineering school. Now you have graduated! For the rest of your life nobody will be able to say you never finish anything.

                      Best of luck on your career. My advice is when considering a job to look hard at the person who will be managing you. Bad managers are a misery.

                      metalmagpie

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