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Square inside, round outside steel stock for toolholder.

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  • #16
    https://www.sturdybroaching.com/products-sleeves

    AFAIK, Sturdy Broaching is the only company left in the US that keeps these in stock. You can get them in a variety of different materials including mild steel if you need to weld them.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by dian View Post
      look for "square hole sleeves". some are free machining (non-weldable), some are hardened (same).
      Non-weldable is a loose term. TIG welding is no problem.

      -Doozer
      DZER

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      • #18
        Nice-
        I've been using a small cutter in the mill to
        make a few square holes like that. For the first
        time in almost ever, I found myself wanting broaches.

        Thing is, the mill and the bits are paid for...

        t
        rusting in Seattle

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        • #19
          OK HSM beginners question, I'm slow some times and do not get the BIG picture as to how this is set up, what part of the cutter is doing the work? I have looked at the links and see the round stock with the square hole, so does a carbide insert go in the hole flat the same size? I thought the corners of a cutter did the work. I'd like to learn about this, I'm just not understanding this one

          TX
          Mr fixit for the family
          Chris

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Mr Fixit View Post
            OK HSM beginners question, I'm slow some times and do not get the BIG picture as to how this is set up, what part of the cutter is doing the work? I have looked at the links and see the round stock with the square hole, so does a carbide insert go in the hole flat the same size? I thought the corners of a cutter did the work. I'd like to learn about this, I'm just not understanding this one

            TX
            Mr fixit for the family
            Chris
            Usually carbide inserts are bolted or clamped into holders made for them. These parts are more or less "generic" tooling that you can make whatever you want out of it, doesn't have to be carbide at all. For example, a square HSS lathe bit, stuck in the round sleeve, for a home-made boring bar. If you sleeve and boring bar is big enough, you could use larger square shank tooling that is made for carbide.
            25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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            • #21
              Originally posted by redlee View Post
              https://www.reidsupply.com/en-us/p/machine-tool-sleeves

              Is this what you are looking for ?
              Square Hole Sleeve.
              Can't weld 12L14.

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              • #22
                Here's one I made once:



                This writeup shows how: https://nwnative.us/Grant/shop%20art...aper%20wrench/

                metalmagpie

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                • #23
                  http://www.greenbaymfgco.com/12L14-sleeves.phpd

                  12L14 so you can't weld on them. Brazing is no problem though.

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                  • #24
                    I will have to make the reverse holder for the 16mm solid carbide boring bar, square outside and round bore. That is a simpler concept except the 16mm hole needs to be about 95mm deep. I'm hoping there is a 16mm reamer at the museum as I can't bore that deep. If I can ream the hole, the block will have a ground 16mm bar through it supported on vee blocks and the flat top and bottom milled parallel to the bore, as the reamer will follow any hole that is drilled.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by metalmagpie View Post

                      Can't weld 12L14.
                      Total BS.

                      -D
                      DZER

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                      • #26
                        Paging Doozer, to the white phone please:
                        12L14 can be welded but it's far less than ideal. From the welder's standpoint (that's me) *any* of the free-machining alloys suck. The free-machining elements destroy or hinder the weldability. It can be welded but the job will suck, and most likely have severely compromised strength depending on the procedure. Fortunately for this application,. the brute strength isn't a great factor because you can rely on close fit inside a bore to do that. The weld is basically a locating device, not a holding device in this case.
                        25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                        • #27
                          The lead in 12L will rapidly oxidize when arc welded. This leaves a poor weld bead and poorer adhesion. It might hold but the weld looks like crap. Unless though, you grind it down and fill the porosity with bondo...

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                          • #28
                            I said TIG weld.
                            I said TIG weld.
                            I said TIG weld.
                            Reading comprehension people.

                            -Doozer
                            DZER

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Doozer View Post
                              I said TIG weld.
                              I said TIG weld.
                              I said TIG weld.
                              Reading comprehension people.

                              -Doozer
                              I can read just fine, and I know that you said TIG before.
                              I didn't say it couldn't be done, I said it wasn't a good idea.
                              The most important part of any weld is the chemistry, not the process.

                              MAYBE TIG could work if you're slow enough to let all the lead boil off. I am not going to trust that. Especially near the edge of the HAZ, how are things going to recrystallize? Really, the process makes no difference. But just saying as a welder, welding *anything* that is free machining, sucks rocks thru a dead woodchuck. And every welder on the planet will tell you that welding Leadloy isn't recommended. Unless maybe you're desperate. It s a poor hack far as I'm concerned.
                              Last edited by nickel-city-fab; 05-18-2021, 07:37 PM.
                              25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                              • #30
                                Just bore a square hole....

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