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  • #16
    Originally posted by Bds60 View Post
    Found this gem just now , can anyone help identify it?

    https://www.kijiji.ca/v-power-tool/c...rce=ios_social
    Well yes I can. I own one.
    2730

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

    Everything not impossible is compulsory

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    • #17
      Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

      Well yes I can. I own one.
      What is it J Tiers? From my newbie research it appears to be a 40s south bend?

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      • #18
        For that price get over there right away with cash in hand. Assuming the bed rails are not hogged out by much that's an absolute steel of a deal.

        It's a Logan lathe. And that means for the size range it's a VERY NICE machine.

        It's lacking the quick change gear box for threading but you were looking at frequent back cover, greasy finger gear changes with the 701 too. So no big deal.

        Chilliwack BC, Canada

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        • #19
          Nope, not an SB, it is a Logan, the Wards version of the Model 200. A very nice machine, actually, and I like the drive on that better than the "patent Logan Drive Box" that they used on their own.

          Mine actually has a Southbend drive, but it is almost the same as that one. I paid somewhat more for mine.

          There should be a total of 17 extra gears with the machine, some of which are probably mounted under the swinging cover on the left end. it is a "change gear" machine, so to change the threading you have to swap gears around under that cover.

          That appears to be the type with a 9" carriage. I actually have parts for that, I changed mine over to being a 10" carriage type. Logan still exists and has parts, although not the special parts for the 9" version. Parts won't matter if the thing is operational as far as threading is concerned.

          Here's mine:

          Last edited by J Tiers; 05-08-2021, 08:20 PM.
          2730

          Keep eye on ball.
          Hashim Khan

          Everything not impossible is compulsory

          Comment


          • #20
            Thanks gentleman! Heading over right now to pick up this machine. As long as the ways are in decent condition.

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            • #21
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ID:	1942159 Well I picked up the Wards Logan 200 for a price of 500 CAD. The ways appeared good on inspection. In the process of cleaning up all the sawdust off the gear train. Starting to notice some missing teeth, also a cracked casting as pictured below. As mentioned by others, these parts are all still available from purchase from Logan?
              Attached Files

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              • #22
                Sorry for duplicate photos, posting via phone.
                *motor not in pictures*

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                • #23
                  Despite the broken gear teeth you still made out like a bandit.

                  There are a couple of techniques for replacing a tooth in gears provided the section of the body is big enough to tolerate the needed shallow dovetail cutout for the replacement inserted tooth. So I'd be looking at replacing the smaller drive gear on the end of the main shaft. But for what I think will be a costly option in the case of the missing back gear tooth we can walk you through inserting a new tooth.

                  I personally haven't done a gear tooth yet but at this point I've made 3 new dovetailed front sights for rifles which turned out to not be that big of a deal to fit. This includes actually hand filing the dovetail into one replacement barrel and THEN making the front sight to fit. It seems like a daunting task but with a modified triangle file and a little practice on a piece of scrap round bar and a couple of jury rigged jigs it was actually not bad at all to get the nicely shaped dovetail with the desired slight taper. And since you'll do your practice with scrap metal you get to where you're decent at it on stuff which isn't important.

                  I see that the release handle for the reversing tumbler lever is broken off too. That's likely something that Logan will have. But if not or it's crazy expensive it's another part which could be done with basic tools by hand.

                  It's actually amazing what can be done with a few GOOD QUALITY metal files in good condition, a hack saw and proper layout. And as a bonus it's also a not bad upper body and aerobic workout for the guy doing the work too

                  The ways are marked but in the big full size pictures the top ridges seem fairly crisp. I'm thinking that a pretty extensive or better yet total strip down for good deep cleaning is a good idea. And while you're at it clean off the old paint and treat your new companion to some fresh "clothing".

                  Along with a fair number of the others here I've used a Logan at a past job where it sat mostly neglected by the others. But it earned me some points with the boss when I was able to make things on it for work and I used it here and there over the years before I got my own lathe. They are first rate machines and depending on your needs of your own machining this may in fact be the last lathe you ever need. You may find you need to upSIZE and get a bigger lathe depending on circumstances and what sort of things you make. But within the size range of jobs that fit the Logan you won't find a better bench top machine.
                  Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                  • #24
                    nice! that'll keep you busy for a while

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                    • #25
                      Perfect thanks BC Rider, already running into issues with a seized on backplate to the spindle nose (hopefully some heat will help). As for the belt on the primary drive pulley, it appears to be riveted together. Is this normal, or should I find a seamless belt elsewhere?

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                      • #26
                        Good deal!! And with all the money that you saved over the original lathe posted ($2000CAD!), you can afford to equip this one nicely. A quick change tool post & a set of tools would be my first buy. And a 3ph motor with VFD, an electric feed drive to avoid changing gears, a tail stock drill chuck, 4-jaw chuck, a steady maybe. Even then you'd be nowhere near the $2500 that the 1st one was.

                        As I recall, Logan parts are pretty expensive & that cracked casting could likely be fixed with brazing.

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                        • #27
                          There's a wide number of options for joining flat belts. Riveting is one of them. I'm pretty sure a search on "flat belt joints" or something along that line on YT would turn up some options. Some others have gone over to using automotive style multi V belts turned inside out so the flat side runs on the pulley faces. But the downside with that is replacement means taking the head stock apart. The upside is that you don't get the repetitive "thwop-thwop-thwop... " sound with each pass of the seam.

                          Since you'll have the head stock apart for the gear tooth issue anyway.... You might need to search a bit to find a belt that is wide enough. Some of the belts off the bigger V8's with lots of driven accessories would be a good start. A visit to a local Lordco, Napa or similar on a day when they are not too busy with your old drive belt? Or perhaps you can leave it with one of the counter guys for when they do have a quiet moment?
                          Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                          • #28
                            The gear on the spindle is not integral, and is obtainable.

                            You appear to have around a dozen gears, out of the 17. Logan gears are around on ebay and elsewhere. If you buy from Logan, they will be rather expensive, as in $50 or better each, which is "fair", but not practical. Ebay, etc is better. You can likely get them for in the area of $10 per.

                            You mentioned a cracked casting, and there are several pics of the rear bearing housing, with what "could be" a crack showing, or might be a molding mark. If that is what you were referring to, and it is in fact a crack, that is not a great place to have one. It's odd to find a crack on one side and not the other, since Ci is not known for being flexible or springy enough to crack on just one side..... but maybe that is not what you meant.... it is just what there are pics of.

                            However, people part out these machines, and so headstocks are available if needed. Repair might be possible also. I am not sure I'd want to braze it, and I might think about some of the lower temp rods that could be used. It is actually not a high stress location, the issue is more a matter of stabilizing it, and looking around for another one.

                            I recently bought a headstock for a Rivett 608PV, because I needed some parts that I did not want to repair. There were only ever 2800 or so of those ever made, and considerably fewer were the "PV " variant, yet I found one for sale. It can be done.

                            2730

                            Keep eye on ball.
                            Hashim Khan

                            Everything not impossible is compulsory

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Click image for larger version

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ID:	1942188 Last newbie question I promise, upon disassembly these gib spacers fell out. Just want to know exactly where they go back upon re assembling this thing. Everything else is pretty self explanatory.

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                              • #30
                                The crack I see is in the third and the last photos of post #21. On the bearing housing at the bottom on the change gears, the swing arm where the final bearing sits - the one that drives the lead screw.. This should certainly be fixable by brazing, etc. I'm guessing there is a bronze bushing in there, someone who actually owns one of these will know for sure.
                                "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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