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  • Tundra Twin Track
    replied
    Originally posted by Cookie View Post
    Mazak is a fine lathe. $6,000 over 10 years has provided you with a very sound investment.
    We were just talking about the prices of used everything. We meaning my hobby machinist group near Sacramento Ca.
    It seems everything is on back order, the used everything market is way up $$$!!.
    I sure hope things settle down soon. I'm thankful my shop is set-up and fully equipped.
    It’s a Mazak Clone,if I have the story correct Mazak sent all there Manual Lathe Molds &Specifications to China in mid 80’s to have them built as they were focused on CNC machines.Before any made in China Mazaks were sold a corporate decision was made to drop Manual Lathe production entirely.They didn’t get there molds back and were made in China for a number of years by Jinan First Machine Tool.Only thing I’ve noticed is the paint job could have been better,machine weighs 5000lbs.

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  • Cookie
    replied
    Mazak is a fine lathe. $6,000 over 10 years has provided you with a very sound investment.
    We were just talking about the prices of used everything. We meaning my hobby machinist group near Sacramento Ca.
    It seems everything is on back order, the used everything market is way up $$$!!.
    I sure hope things settle down soon. I'm thankful my shop is set-up and fully equipped.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tundra Twin Track
    replied
    Originally posted by BCRider View Post
    Dennis and Joe, once again let's not forget that this is a world wide forum. And that prices on used machinery varies wildly depending on where we are in the world.

    But having said that there's also the crazy factor to contend with. There's always someone that thinks their junk is gold plated or "vintage" or some other nonsense. The guy with the Tida lathe and that little dainty mill is one of those. I'm sure every interest and regional area has one of those. And they won't listen to sense. Or perhaps they are looking for the right sucker to come along. They list and relist their stuff at the same stratospheric price and just don't care. It just is what it is. That guy is clearly one of those.
    Yes some sellers are over the Moon on prices,I bought this 18x60 Mazak Clone made in China 1988 with 3-1/8 bore for $6000 cdn. Not a steal but it came equipped with Newall DRO and Rapidue QCTP with 10 holders and 2 speed tail stock which is a real bonus.I changed the 10hp 3ph out to a 5hp 1 ph that was on hand,it’s been nearly 10 yrs that I got it and have been very pleased with it.This came out of a running Machine Shop and Shop Foreman said they kept the identical Summit lathe as this and he mentioned they they got rid the wrong Lathe. Click image for larger version

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  • JoeLee
    replied
    Originally posted by BCRider View Post
    Dennis and Joe, once again let's not forget that this is a world wide forum. And that prices on used machinery varies wildly depending on where we are in the world.

    But having said that there's also the crazy factor to contend with. There's always someone that thinks their junk is gold plated or "vintage" or some other nonsense. The guy with the Tida lathe and that little dainty mill is one of those. I'm sure every interest and regional area has one of those. And they won't listen to sense. Or perhaps they are looking for the right sucker to come along. They list and relist their stuff at the same stratospheric price and just don't care. It just is what it is. That guy is clearly one of those.

    In the meantime bds has found a slightly abused lathe that after a bit of work and a couple of new parts will be an amazing machine for the size and end up under $1K.
    Your right, and that is the ebay mindset.

    JL..............

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  • BCRider
    replied
    Dennis and Joe, once again let's not forget that this is a world wide forum. And that prices on used machinery varies wildly depending on where we are in the world.

    But having said that there's also the crazy factor to contend with. There's always someone that thinks their junk is gold plated or "vintage" or some other nonsense. The guy with the Tida lathe and that little dainty mill is one of those. I'm sure every interest and regional area has one of those. And they won't listen to sense. Or perhaps they are looking for the right sucker to come along. They list and relist their stuff at the same stratospheric price and just don't care. It just is what it is. That guy is clearly one of those.

    In the meantime bds has found a slightly abused lathe that after a bit of work and a couple of new parts will be an amazing machine for the size and end up under $1K.

    Leave a comment:


  • JoeLee
    replied
    Originally posted by Bds60 View Post
    https://www.kijiji.ca/v-power-tool/e...rce=ios_social
    https://www.kijiji.ca/v-power-tool/e...rce=ios_social

    Hey gents, just stumbled across this on my frequent kijiji search for machining tools. For 4000 CAD would you personally purchase this equipment?

    1100 RPM in high gear seams awfully low...
    For those prices you could get good used American made machinery. Too many brands to mention.The mill doesn't look too solid. And then there is the issue of getting parts.

    JL...........

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  • Tundra Twin Track
    replied
    Congrats on your new machine Bds60!

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by David Powell View Post
    Does it really matter if someone pays a little over the average, median, or expected price for something hobby related if it is something they actually want and will happily use , play with or simply treasure for many years?
    ......................
    Regards David Powell.
    Of course not.

    On the other hand, if one pays the going rate, as opposed to a premium, one has more left over to use for something else they actually want and will happily use.

    There is no sense in paying more than one has to. And there is no sense in allowing price, if within your means, to stop you from enjoying your hobby or other activity.

    If something you want comes up for sale, but the price is a little more than expected, you have a choice to make. If the item is uncommon (I will not say "rare"), or is in better than usual condition, or is simply exactly what you want, and you can afford it, then saving some money by not buying it is probably not going to give you as much enjoyment as paying a higher price that is still affordable.

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  • David Powell
    replied
    Does it really matter if someone pays a little over the average, median, or expected price for something hobby related if it is something they actually want and will happily use , play with or simply treasure for many years?
    I like the word " CHEAP" my son says he sees my face on that page of the dictionary.
    I spent over half a lifetime scrimping , saving, and struggling with old tired equipment.. to make a living.
    Now, in retirement, I have become , rather unexpectedly, somewhat wealthier than I anticipated.
    IF I see something I want, workshop or model steam engine related,I usually can afford it without worry,
    If , on reflection and research it seems priced reasonably the only decisions I need to make are where can I put it and how much use and enjoyment will I get from owning and using it !. IF it passes those tests then I often buy.
    I always try for a bit of a discount,thats ingrained , but not getting one will not unduly upset me, nor kill a deal.
    As my children say" You cannot spend your money once you are in your grave"
    Regards David Powell.

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  • DennisCA
    replied
    What insane prices for small machines that seem to be of asian descent, can't you buy new for that price?

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    I have a mill on which the overarm support has been brazed, as has at least one dovetail. it works fine. Brazing the banjo should not be an issue per flexibility etc, if it works for the overarm support, which clamps onto the overarm, it will work for that banjo.

    Gib spacers.... on the carriage, there are two screws sunk into the top of the carriage which adjust a gib. Those spacers go on the screws. IIRC they only fit reasonably one way.

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  • BCRider
    replied
    Originally posted by Bds60 View Post
    Click image for larger version

Name:	BC989219-0D46-42EA-B410-ED0A84ADB1E4.jpeg
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ID:	1942188 Last newbie question I promise, upon disassembly these gib spacers fell out. Just want to know exactly where they go back upon re assembling this thing. Everything else is pretty self explanatory.
    Which gib? Have you looked at the online parts diagrams? A search for "logan model 200 lathe parts diagram" and then click on the "IMAGES" option of your favorite search engine turned up a lot of diagrams to look at.

    And THIS LINK looks to be the current manual for part numbers and even prices. Price list at the bottom of the file.

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  • BCRider
    replied
    Originally posted by mickeyf View Post
    The crack I see is in the third and the last photos of post #21. On the bearing housing at the bottom on the change gears, the swing arm where the final bearing sits - the one that drives the lead screw.. This should certainly be fixable by brazing, etc. I'm guessing there is a bronze bushing in there, someone who actually owns one of these will know for sure.
    And that would actually be the banjo bracket. And I would not consider that to be DIRECTLY fixable by simply brazing since it has to both flex inwards as well as resist direct tension. My OCD'ism suggests that a piece of flat stock be shaped to resemble a "?" shape but with a tighter sharp corner between the rounded and flat portion. This will bridge over the crack and both the crack would be brazed as well as the ? shaped overlap piece.

    And yes, I do wear a set of suspenders as well as my belt...

    Now I might be all wet and perhaps provided the banjo has an inside dimension that is close to the OD of the spigot it fits onto is a pretty close match and it was just some ham fisted guy that broke it? But if there's a bit of play and it NEEDS to be snugged down hard then perhaps some other solution is warranted. Perhaps cutting off the arm of the banjo along with an intact part of the cylinder portion to register the sizes? Then make up (on the lathe) a new cylinder with a different style of lock? Such as a split cotter style? Then get the arms and new cylinder brazed together? So fixable for sure. And quite possibly an improvement?

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  • mickeyf
    replied
    The crack I see is in the third and the last photos of post #21. On the bearing housing at the bottom on the change gears, the swing arm where the final bearing sits - the one that drives the lead screw.. This should certainly be fixable by brazing, etc. I'm guessing there is a bronze bushing in there, someone who actually owns one of these will know for sure.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bds60
    replied
    Click image for larger version

Name:	BC989219-0D46-42EA-B410-ED0A84ADB1E4.jpeg
Views:	126
Size:	3.02 MB
ID:	1942188 Last newbie question I promise, upon disassembly these gib spacers fell out. Just want to know exactly where they go back upon re assembling this thing. Everything else is pretty self explanatory.

    Leave a comment:

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