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Project: Building the MLA-18 Filing Machine

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  • Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

    Thanks! Believe me, a mill is on the wish list.... right next to winning the lotto and marrying Dolly Parton
    You don't want that sort..... the crazy good looking ones know they are, mostly, and don't let you forget it. Unless they are just off the farm. Get a mill first!

    Plenty of nice ladies who look good and don't have the 'tude. Besides, in general, anyone you are that interested in, you will think looks pretty darn good regardless.... just a fact.

    Good looks are as good looks do. I would not put up with a shrew just because she was crazy good looking.... other's mileage may vary.
    2730

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

    Everything not impossible is compulsory

    Comment


    • I'm getting pretty excited now.
      Partially assembled and tested, works good.
      In the first photo you can see the crank disc with it's slide block
      behind the scotch yoke block, which clamps onto the tool holder shaft:

      Click image for larger version

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      An overall view:

      Click image for larger version

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      There are some small but important tasks remaining.
      Need to make a "plug" for the hole in the bottom to keep the oil in.
      I need to shorten the screws that I ordered for the back cover.
      I need to shape the ends of the table support bars.
      Most likely use the angle grinder and a selection of files for that.
      Need to find the felt rings that Andy included with the kit.
      Can't recall where I put them (ggrr...)
      25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

      Comment


      • Well, this is coming along nicely. A good design, nice castings, and great workmanship. Something to be proud of! Congratulations!
        I cut it off twice; it's still too short
        Oregon, USA

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        • Originally posted by Tim Clarke View Post
          Well, this is coming along nicely. A good design, nice castings, and great workmanship. Something to be proud of! Congratulations!
          Thanks Tim, it means a lot! Currently the bottom plug is giving a PITA...
          25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

          Comment


          • Looking good! Are you going with just the Glyptal, or are you going to top-coat it? The Glyptal is a nice color.
            Location: Northern WI

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            • Originally posted by Galaxie View Post
              Looking good! Are you going with just the Glyptal, or are you going to top-coat it? The Glyptal is a nice color.
              Thanks! I'll probably go with just the Glyptal although I'm not crazy about the color.
              I can live with that, for its indestructible properties.
              I did some experimenting and discovered that the only thing that softens Glyptal is, soaking it overnight in denatured alcohol.
              And even then, you won't get it all off.
              25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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              • Finally solved the riddle of the bottom plug.
                Lesson learned: sometimes it is better to just purchase the right answer.
                In this case, a 26mm "expansion plug" or "freeze plug"
                from NAPA auto parts for $1.69.

                Coated the hole with loctite, and knocked the plug in nice and tight.
                Looks like factory-made and fits perfect.
                25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                • Assembly photos.
                  No oil in it yet, everything functions properly.
                  Just spinning it over by hand.
                  The oil will be the last step.
                  First pic is the automotive freeze plug I installed in the bottom this morning.

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                  ... and the assembly pics with back cover on:

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                  I still have to finish the brackets for the work table, just a matter of grinding and filing.
                  Basically putting a radius on the ends.
                  After that is final assembly and adding oil.
                  AND figuring out how to drive it.
                  Last edited by nickel-city-fab; 07-02-2021, 06:22 PM.
                  25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                  • When I was thinking about building one of these, I asked myself the same question: how to drive it, and how to mount. A thought I had was to mount it to the lathe bed, and use a drive shaft with universal joints. I was thinking about using 3/8" socket joints, or shop made of similar size. Give it a think, you'll come up with something!
                    I cut it off twice; it's still too short
                    Oregon, USA

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                    • A used motor is cheap.
                      12" x 35" Logan 2557V lathe
                      Index "Super 55" mill
                      18" Vectrax vertical bandsaw
                      7" x 10" Vectrax mitering bandsaw
                      24" State disc sander

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                      • Originally posted by ezduzit View Post
                        A used motor is cheap.
                        Agree.

                        Around here, a good small motor of maybe 1/3 HP, which is entirely adequate for a filing machine, might cost from $5 to $10 at a garage sale. It may include a pulley. Add a chunk of plywood, a pulley, and a belt, you are good to go and can set it up anywhere you want.

                        The make-do using lathe power is not likely to be much if any cheaper, and it promises to be a nuisance to use, with no real advantages.
                        2730

                        Keep eye on ball.
                        Hashim Khan

                        Everything not impossible is compulsory

                        Comment


                        • Well, frankly I was hoping to keep the number of motors in my shop down to a minimum. That said, I do have an unused PM motor from a 7x10 mini-lathe, along with the speed control box. I ordered the optional pulley casting with the kit, so I'll have to make that part if i go that route.

                          As far as materials, tools, and motors go, my budget is zero -- use what is on hand, because I will likely not have any income until at least Halloween. (medical complications)

                          Hence my tendency to save and re-purpose everything possible.
                          25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                          • Want to hear something funny?
                            The mini lathe motor is rated at 3/4 HP..... at 5,000 RPM.
                            The South bend motor that actually built the filing machine is rated 1/2 HP at... 1750 RPM.

                            I *could* use the mini-lathe motor with its controller, but -- there are some issues I have with that
                            One being, its just butt-ugly. And no real clean way to mount any of it.
                            Also,. where to get a belt? (Probably McMaster)
                            And of course I would have to machine the pulley -- I would use the flat belt option.
                            And find something to mount it all on. I do have some scrap wood I could use.

                            Another option would be to drive it directly off the lathe.
                            This appeals to me because
                            I'm trying to keep the number of separate motors and machines down to the minimum possible.
                            Mainly because the entire "shop" is a spare 10x12 bedroom.
                            I already have the MT2 blank arbor, all I would have to do is drill and tap
                            both the arbor and the input shaft and screw them together.
                            MT2 arbor goes into the spindle and there's your power drive.
                            I would have to build a base to sit on the lathe bed though.
                            Either wood, or pour resin to cast it to fit.

                            I think the cast resin is the coolest idea, guaranteed to get the center height correct.

                            As far as wood goes, I'm lucky if I can tack a dog house together and would prefer to avoid it if possible.
                            Every time I have to do wood work my blood pressure goes up.
                            25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

                            Comment


                            • Why would you use a blank arbor? Lots of better uses for that.

                              I'd just chuck a scrap piece of round and turn a pulley mounting on it. Just chuck it for use also.
                              2730

                              Keep eye on ball.
                              Hashim Khan

                              Everything not impossible is compulsory

                              Comment


                              • Nothing worst than a butt ugly motor.

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