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Project: Building the MLA-18 Filing Machine

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  • Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
    Why would you use a blank arbor? Lots of better uses for that.

    I'd just chuck a scrap piece of round and turn a pulley mounting on it. Just chuck it for use also.
    Actually that's probably the best idea so far. Thanks! I have ~4 inches of shaft hanging out of the machine as it is. I can always use the ER32 collet chuck with the 3/4" collet to drive it from the lathe spindle. That would get me up and running, although I would still have to make some sort of base for it to set across the lathe bed. I've plenty of wood to experiment with, but it certainly isn't anything you could put a finish on.
    Last edited by nickel-city-fab; 07-03-2021, 10:43 AM.
    25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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    • Originally posted by old mart View Post
      Nothing worst than a butt ugly motor.
      LOL yeah I know how that sounds -- but a modern chinese-made motor with all kinds of plastic housing, just doesn't fit too well with the rest of the machine IMHO. And of course the plastic housing would have to be hacked up and modified to suit anyway. And at the end of the day, it would all still be bolted down to a piece of scrap wood that came from the bin.
      25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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      • I would use a driveshaft otherwise you are overconstrained.
        21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
        1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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        • Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post
          I would use a driveshaft otherwise you are overconstrained.
          Very true -- I was a bit worried about that. Premature bearing failure etc. no fun.

          I just checked out flat belting on McMaster. If I were to use the minilathe motor and controller. It's starting to look like I'll have to go in that direction regardless. Somehow, I want to make the project look like it wasn't cobbled together from scrap.
          Last edited by nickel-city-fab; 07-03-2021, 02:03 PM.
          25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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          • That orange stuff is ok but very stretchy, and a very low friction coefficient. I'd consider trying their premade stuff, per inch. I've heard that is close to Dumore belts, which are nice.
            ​​
            Also U-joints on McM are very high. We spent >$600 on them for my senior design project. Definetly cheaper to buy a motor.
            21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
            1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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            • Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post
              That orange stuff is ok but very stretchy, and a very low friction coefficient. I'd consider trying their premade stuff, per inch. I've heard that is close to Dumore belts, which are nice.
              ​​
              Also U-joints on McM are very high. We spent >$600 on them for my senior design project. Definetly cheaper to buy a motor.
              I was actually looking at the made-to-order green and black flat belts.
              I did the math on the ratios and it seems most everybody wants between 100 to about 700 RPM (max) going into the machine.
              I think I can get by with a 3/4" or 1" pulley on the motor at 5,000 RPM. The pulley blank in the kit should clean up around 5 inches.
              At least the minilathe motor would give me variable speed ability.
              But like I said, the real challenge is to make the whole project look halfway decent and not like hack job.
              An older original motor from the 50's or 60's would work great, but then I would lose the variable speed
              and I have to keep the spending down to zip. Literally zip budget.
              But plenty of time....
              25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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              • What type of motor do you really want? Maybe one of us can scrounge something up. I've got lots but not much variable speed...
                21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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                • Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

                  ................................
                  But like I said, the real challenge is to make the whole project look halfway decent and not like hack job.
                  An older original motor from the 50's or 60's would work great, but then I would lose the variable speed
                  and I have to keep the spending down to zip. Literally zip budget.
                  But plenty of time....
                  The budget may call for ugly now. You can fix that later.

                  I do not think you want the higher speed. My filer is set up with 4 speeds, two via pulleys,and two more I could get by changing motor speed. I keep it on about 100. Much faster, and the files are probably rubbing a lot of the time.

                  I have no issues with speed of metal removal. The files move at a speed similar to a regular hand file. That seems to be near optimal for metal removal. Last time I used it, I was expecting it to take a while, but it went quite fast, even though I was removing a fair bit of steel.
                  2730

                  Keep eye on ball.
                  Hashim Khan

                  Everything not impossible is compulsory

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                  • Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post
                    What type of motor do you really want? Maybe one of us can scrounge something up. I've got lots but not much variable speed...
                    Ideally, something like the motor that is on my lathe (1940's GE 1/2 HP) ; but really, I'll just go with the minilathe motor and have the variable speed at this point. After all, I already have it, and I know that it works. I can figure out a mounting system for it. The fun part will be to make a decent housing for the speed control (something that looks like it actually belongs there).
                    25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                    • Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

                      Ideally, something like the motor that is on my lathe (1940's GE 1/2 HP) ; but really, I'll just go with the minilathe motor and have the variable speed at this point. After all, I already have it, and I know that it works. I can figure out a mounting system for it. The fun part will be to make a decent housing for the speed control (something that looks like it actually belongs there).
                      Half is way more than you need. I probably have a 1/4 or 1/3rd I don't care about. Biggest issue is that shipping is wicked high right now (and probably forever).
                      21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                      1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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                      • Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post

                        Half is way more than you need. I probably have a 1/4 or 1/3rd I don't care about. Biggest issue is that shipping is wicked high right now (and probably forever).
                        Yeah, I appreciate the thought, but don't worry about it. I'll just gear down the mini lathe motor into something do-able. That mini-lathe motor is actually rated 3/4 HP at 5,000 but I have doubts about that.... the SB has 1/2 HP at 1750, and you can gear it low enough to twist the entire machine

                        Even better news, I just ran across a wooden tool box that I can use for a base and put all the electricals inside the box.
                        Last edited by nickel-city-fab; 07-03-2021, 04:18 PM.
                        25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                        • Vacuum cleaner belts. The answer is vacuum cleaner belts.
                          I never thought I would be so excited to hang out with the dust bunnies!
                          25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                          • Actually you really don't need variable speed. But you do need the right speed. Many commercial die filers have just a double V-belt sheave.
                            12" x 35" Logan 2557V lathe
                            Index "Super 55" mill
                            18" Vectrax vertical bandsaw
                            7" x 10" Vectrax mitering bandsaw
                            24" State disc sander

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                            • Well, I re-did the math
                              Using 5" for the machine pulley, and 3/4" (0,750) for the motor pulley
                              Would give a max of 750 RPM with the motor wide open at 5k RPM.
                              So its very likely this is what I will do
                              Both pulleys will be crowned for flat belt.
                              Since I'm looking at using vacuum cleaner belts which can be bent to a very tight radius
                              I think it'll work OK.

                              Starting to get some ideas for the motor mounting too.
                              The mini lathes use a pair of M5 holes radially in the side of the motor.
                              My main concern is how to get proper belt tension.
                              It'll probably come down to just eyeballing it and shoving the belt on with a small pry bar.
                              25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                              • Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
                                ...It'll probably come down to just eyeballing it and shoving the belt on with a small pry bar.
                                Ugh. Do it the way they mount the motor on a contractors saw, hinged so that the weight of the motor pivoting tensions the belt. No adjustment needed. This is how I did it on my small vintage Sears table saw.

                                12" x 35" Logan 2557V lathe
                                Index "Super 55" mill
                                18" Vectrax vertical bandsaw
                                7" x 10" Vectrax mitering bandsaw
                                24" State disc sander

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