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    I recently got a Treadmill with MC 60 controller,was wondering if device attached to the blue wire AC input is a overload protection of some sort the device was mounted to brush end of motor.

    The black DC wire is routed through a transformer before connected to motor.Is that common? Click image for larger version

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    The Pot is not one I’ve seen before,it has a definite off detent position and fine detents in variable rotary positions.

  • #2
    The "transformer" is probably an inductor, and that is common with treadmill drives, yes. That type pot is also common, although pots are not common anymore to begin with......

    The little item on the blue wires is similar in size to some thermal cutoffs often used in transformers and some motors. it appears to possibly be in series with the white power wire, which would clinch it as a thermal cutoff
    Last edited by J Tiers; 05-08-2021, 01:03 PM.
    2730

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan


    It's just a box of rain, I don't know who put it there.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
      The "transformer" is probably an inductor, and that is common with treadmill drives, yes.
      Thanks Tiers,is the device mounted on blue AC input a heat sensing overload?

      Comment


      • #4
        See edit.... you posted too quickly!
        2730

        Keep eye on ball.
        Hashim Khan


        It's just a box of rain, I don't know who put it there.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
          See edit.... you posted too quickly!
          Thanks again

          Comment


          • #6
            It might well be the speed sensor for the track. I took apart a road side treadmill about a year back and it had a sensor that was mounted near one end of the main driven roller (belt drive). It seemed pretty obvious to me that it was for sensing the track speed so it would consistently match speeds to settings.
            Chilliwack BC, Canada

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            • #7
              Originally posted by BCRider View Post
              It might well be the speed sensor for the track. I took apart a road side treadmill about a year back and it had a sensor that was mounted near one end of the main driven roller (belt drive). It seemed pretty obvious to me that it was for sensing the track speed so it would consistently match speeds to settings.
              It’s on the AC input and was mounted on brush end of motor.

              Comment


              • #8
                the blue thing is a thermal overload and usually mounts on the motor. You can get rid of it.

                The pot is normal, it's what's used to control speed on SCR type controllers like the MC60

                The transformer like thing is used to provide a cleaner DC voltage to the motor, keep it. Motor is a little rougher and noisier without it.

                You can also clip or desolder a resistor next to the middle leg of the pot on the board, RPS3 I think, and that will allow you to restart the motor at the same speed. You can see it here right next to the middle plug for the pot
                Click image for larger version

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                good find though, those are sweet controllers. You'll be limited to a 1 to 1 1/4hp motor - you can run larger (I do) but if you take a really deep cut or try power tapping 1/2-13 in steel it'll shut down on you. No big issue, just stop doing whatever you were doing that caused the problem and you'll be fine. My new drive system is with a MC2100 so I can use more of the motors power - those ones can handle up to 2hp, but they're much more finicky to set up.

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                • #9
                  Pots are also used to control the PWM version, it is an analogue input to the PWM micro.
                  On the actual T.M. at the console is also analogue before being converted to a PWM control signal into the motor board.
                  As Matt suggested, the choke is to reduce the 120Hz spikes on the DC motor line.
                  The PWM version uses common mode Toroidal ferrite choke version usually.
                  Last edited by MaxHeadRoom; 05-08-2021, 03:17 PM.

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                  • #10
                    Thanks for the info guys,never seen a Gas Shock Incline setup before, this is Canadian built machine no Metric Fastners. Click image for larger version

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                    • #11
                      Yes, the little device connected to blue is a thermal overload. I have seen similar in two different treadmills I rescued from the side of the street. Both of the ones I got had the two blue wires connected with a strip of what I think was low melting point alloy of some sort and snapped into a plastic holder. They were stuck inside the brush end of the motor. Both were melted through and both treadmills started working when I jumped them out.
                      I just need one more tool,just one!

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                      • #12
                        Usually, that sort of overload is "self-resetting". Those particular ones might be "one shot" types, of course.

                        The "one-shot" type are usually cylindrical, maybe 5 or 6 mm diameter, and 12mm or so long, somewhat "bullet shaped" with the wires out the ends.

                        The inductor (choke) is used because the motor does not have enough inductance to keep smooth current flow at slower speeds. Torque in a motor is related directly to current. So if the current varies, there will be a similar variation in torque, and the treadmill will seem "rough" at slower speeds.
                        2730

                        Keep eye on ball.
                        Hashim Khan


                        It's just a box of rain, I don't know who put it there.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thanks again,I think this Tread Mill maybe older as it used batteries to run the digital panel,only wires from panel was the 2 wires going to speed sensor.
                          AC power was routed all way to the upper console to teather deadman switch.I will probably use this control to run some other motors I have most have keyed shafts as pic shows. Click image for larger version

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                          • #14
                            those are lovely motors. I like the ones that don't have the fan built into the flywheel, so I can run it without them and still have decent cooling. I used to think the flywheels were a good thing (smooth out interrupted cuts) but now I think they're a giant PITA and take them off as soon as I can Just be aware of the limits to how much power that MC60 can provide - you won't hurt it by going over, but it will get irritating if you exceed it regularly.

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                            • #15
                              Today's surplus treadmills typically have motors labeled as being rated for between 2 and 3 horsepower. And the boards that run them are unusable for repurposing. I am not aware of a design for a DIY speed control circuit for these larger motors. I would love to find such a design. Anyone know of one?

                              metalmagpie

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