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  • Frankenstein lathe

    Once in a scrap yard, I found a rusty lathe. It was a TV-6M training machine for schoolchildren, they were in all secondary schools. Thanks to the schoolchildren, they broke the machine immediately and it did not have any wear on the base guide surfaces and due to a malfunction, the machine was scrapped) I cleaned the machine of rust, painted it, and completed the missing units, since there was no upper part of the caliper and tailstock. (and motor). And I made a new wooden cabinet for it from plywood and an old bookshelf. That's why I call him - Frankenstein! The first photo shows this handsome man about ten years ago. But over time, I found that the spindle was not very good there and needed to be replaced. (beating, poor stiffness, difficult cutting) Click image for larger version

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    And a couple of years ago, at a flea market, I bought a headstock from a local clone of a Shaublin 102 lathe. The problem of replacing the headstock was that this type of headstock does not have an output shaft to drive the feed box. And I had to introduce a direction change bit with its gears and an output shaft to drive the caliper feed box into the body of this headstock. It turned out very well. The machine runs quietly, cleanly and accurately, cuts perfectly, the runout on the spindle is less than 0.1 micron! Now I am satisfied with my machine.
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ID:	1942552I won!

  • #2
    Nice adaptation. Looks like a capable little lathe.

    Interested in the Schaublin clone comment. I know Sixis made machines that are largely interchangeable with Schaublin and Aciera, were there others? any 70 clones?
    in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post
      Nice adaptation. Looks like a capable little lathe.

      Interested in the Schaublin clone comment. I know Sixis made machines that are largely interchangeable with Schaublin and Aciera, were there others? any 70 clones?
      370 / 5000Результаты перевода

      Thank you. I live in Ukraine, and when the USSR existed, some factories tried to make copies of some of the machines of well-known firms for themselves, and my front grandmother from such copying attempts. To install this headstock on my machine, I had to slightly change its installation dimensions, since the machines have different bed geometries. They are not interchangeable, but it is possible to install.

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      • #4
        You can call it whatever you like. It is a nice bit of work!! Congratulations on creating a nice machine!!!
        S E Michigan

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        • #5
          Many would not go to the trouble you did to adapt the different head stock. Nicely done!
          Chilliwack BC, Canada

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          • #6
            Thanks guys, I'm glad you liked it.
            It's my passion to redo and adapt everything that comes to hand, having fun in retirement.
            It's such a stupid habit.

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            • #7
              Mcgyver, Habegger was another Schaublin clone, at least they made lathes with parts that were interchangeable (to a degree).
              West Sussex UK

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Alan Smith View Post
                Mcgyver, Habegger was another Schaublin clone, at least they made lathes with parts that were interchangeable (to a degree).
                Right you are, forgot about them.
                in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by pensioner View Post
                  Thanks guys, I'm glad you liked it.
                  It's my passion to redo and adapt everything that comes to hand, having fun in retirement.
                  It's such a stupid habit.
                  WOW that is a beautiful machine! Well done!
                  25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by pensioner View Post

                    370 / 5000Результаты перевода

                    Thank you. I live in Ukraine, and when the USSR existed, some factories tried to make copies of some of the machines of well-known firms for themselves, and my front grandmother from such copying attempts. To install this headstock on my machine, I had to slightly change its installation dimensions, since the machines have different bed geometries. They are not interchangeable, but it is possible to install.
                    Interesting that you are in the Ukraine. It used to be the forum software would display your location, but not any more for some reason.
                    I have watched quite a few Russian Youtube videos, and I recognize that lathe as the type and shape that I remember from may of the
                    Russian videos that I have watched. What brand is it? Is there an English translation to the name ? It looks like a very compact
                    gearhead lathe with an enclosed threading box. Both nice features of any lathe.

                    --Doozer
                    DZER

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Doozer View Post

                      Interesting that you are in the Ukraine. It used to be the forum software would display your location, but not any more for some reason.
                      (snip)

                      Doozer, while the new software doesn't show it, you can see location info if you click on the poster's name.

                      But that's a step that many don't take, so I recommend adding location to your sig line.

                      -js
                      There are no stupid questions. But there are lots of stupid answers. This is the internet.

                      Location: SF Bay Area

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by pensioner View Post
                        [snip] the runout on the spindle is less than 0.1 micron! ...
                        Nice work & I'm really impressed that you can measure runout to less than 0.000004"

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Doozer View Post

                          Interesting that you are in the Ukraine. It used to be the forum software would display your location, but not any more for some reason.
                          I have watched quite a few Russian Youtube videos, and I recognize that lathe as the type and shape that I remember from may of the
                          Russian videos that I have watched. What brand is it? Is there an English translation to the name ? It looks like a very compact
                          gearhead lathe with an enclosed threading box. Both nice features of any lathe.

                          --Doozer
                          Hi Doozer, this is a machine for teaching schoolchildren, it is very common with us because it was in every school. When reforms began in school education, these machines were sent for recycling. And the skilled guys, from the recycling bases, took them to the garages for their workshops) The machine is called TB-4 or TB-6, the number denotes the serial number of the machine model, but in fact it is one and the same machine. Without cast iron stands, the machine weighs about 160 - 170 kilograms, the height of the centers is 108 millimeters, the distance between the centers is about 370 millimeters. The modernization of the machine gave me significantly better spindle quality and the center distance is now 450 millimeters. Ivan.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Bob Engelhardt View Post

                            Nice work & I'm really impressed that you can measure runout to less than 0.000004"
                            Thank you, I have a dial gauge with a scale of one micron. I myself was very surprised when I measured the spindle beats. The needle of the device was almost motionless, and at first I thought that the device had broken down, but it turned out that the device was working properly. I just got a good copy.
                            P.S. such a device:

                            Click image for larger version

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                            Last edited by pensioner; 05-12-2021, 10:58 PM.

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                            • #15
                              Very nice! Quite a sturdy design too.
                              I just need one more tool,just one!

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