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  • Small Heat Treat Oven

    This deserves a thread of it's own. I have decided that I need a small heat treat oven. I know nothing about them, but I'm learning fast. I checked out the internet, and ovens in the size range I need range from about $800 Canadian up to $3000 Canadian. I didn't want to spend that kind of money, so I posted a want add in local Buy and Sell newspapers. I got a phone call from Montreal Quebec from an Anglican minister who had some connection to potting. She had two ovens, and would sell me one for $200. plus shipping from Montreal. It shipped UPS and that cost $98. So---the oven came, I plugged it in to 110 volts and it warmed up immediately as you can see in the picture. It had no controls on it at all. I had no idea what controls I needed, but a few helpful people on the forums stepped up and advised me on what I would need. I purchased a PID controller from Ebay, and it cost me about $230 Canadian including shipping. It consists of a plastic box about 5" x 8" x 3" deep, a pyrometer probe which extends thru the side of the oven, two 110 volt cords coming out of it, one with a male end and one with a female plug, an on/off switch, and a digital screen on it. At his time I don't know a heck of a lot more about it, but as I said, I'm learning fast.

    Brian Rupnow
    Design engineer
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada

  • #2
    My two car garage holds a lot of the "overflow" from my small engine hobby, and MUST have a clear space for my good wife's car. I have one place near my air compressor and old stick welder that will do for a place to mount the oven. I have angle iron harvested from 3 old bedframes (That cost $15), and will use that to make a shelf that holds my oven. So here you see the corner where my air compressor and stick welder live, and the frame of angle which will support the oven and the controller. The 3D model of a person is 67" tall, same as myself except for the white beard and pot gut.



    Brian Rupnow
    Design engineer
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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    • #3
      So, if you've been keeping track, I'm now up to $543 Canadian. I don't think I am going to need anything else, but if I do I will let you know. An observation---This heat treat oven, as purchased with no controls, would be very simple and cheap for a home shop guy to build. There is really nothing to it, just some light gauge sheet metal, some fire brick, and a door. There are lots of "How to build your own heat treat oven" videos on Youtube.
      Brian Rupnow
      Design engineer
      Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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      • #4
        Why the contorted legs and wall braces to aforementioned legs?
        Wouldn't two triangular welded angle iron brackets lagged to the wall studs not be sufficient?

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        • #5
          Reggie--I don't really trust brackets cantilevered off the wall. I've had trouble with that in the past.---Brian
          Brian Rupnow
          Design engineer
          Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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          • #6
            Brian, I have had a devil of a time trying to cut bedframe angle with a saw..I suggest a abrasive cutoff wheel to save frustration and time
            Thanks for the update .

            Rich
            Green Bay, WI

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            • #7
              Rich--You're right. Bedframe angles are made from dinosaur bones and carbide. It's the rottenest metal I have ever worked with. The only good thing about it is that it's free or amazingly cheap. If my bandsaw really doesn't like it I will light up my oxy acetylene torch and show it who's boss!!---Brian
              Brian Rupnow
              Design engineer
              Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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              • #8
                X2 bedframe angle can be a bear.... never forgot the few times I've had to work it. It was a trial of patience. But the price is right, usually free. I wonder if they put ferro-manganese in that stuff just to get something that they can roll at the mill.

                PS doing a google search for "bedframe angle alloy" turns up some "interesting" results, videos, and a few funny stories.
                Last edited by nickel-city-fab; 05-15-2021, 08:55 AM.
                25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                • #9
                  Bedframe is re-rolled railroad rail, no, seriously, that's exactly what it is. https://jssteel.com/our-rail-steel-p...th-angle-iron/
                  I just need one more tool,just one!

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                  • #10
                    Brian is it a good idea to mount the control box above the oven? The heat coming off the oven may both the electronics.
                    Larry - west coast of Canada

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                    • #11
                      I wound up making my own. It was cheaper than buying one, but lots of work. I did learn a good deal about refractory ceramics, and general fabrication. Anyhow, I have about $600 in this and the interior if 6"x9.5"x13.5". I'm currently making a case hardening "box" to do pack carburizing of some cheap HRS tools I've made for the lathe. Click image for larger version

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
                        So, if you've been keeping track, I'm now up to $543 Canadian. I don't think I am going to need anything else, but if I do I will let you know. An observation---This heat treat oven, as purchased with no controls, would be very simple and cheap for a home shop guy to build. There is really nothing to it, just some light gauge sheet metal, some fire brick, and a door. There are lots of "How to build your own heat treat oven" videos on Youtube.
                        I've seen some small ovens selling for around that price. Some in need of minor repair but all the controls were there. Some more elaborate than others with timers etc. The inside is usually pretty small, barely big enough to stick my hand in but all I want it for is basically tool bits. I still haven't made up my mind yet. Sometimes the cost of hunting down parts and the time to make one exceeds the cost of buying one even if it's in need of some minor repair.

                        JL.................

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Cuttings View Post
                          Brian is it a good idea to mount the control box above the oven? The heat coming off the oven may both the electronics.
                          I would mount them off the side and spaced off the cabinet.

                          JL..................

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                          • #14
                            I moved things around a little and located the controller below the oven. That should keep oven heat away from the controller better. If I had to, I can put some insulation in the gap between the oven and the controller.
                            Brian Rupnow
                            Design engineer
                            Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                            • #15
                              I've had as much fun as I can stand for one day. Probably about half done on the support frame for the oven. It's been a while since I done much welding, but I do love this mig.
                              Brian Rupnow
                              Design engineer
                              Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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