Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Removing those little data-plate rivets...

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Removing those little data-plate rivets...

    Used a lot of different methods over the years, finally decided I'd try this one.



    I've been wanting to do this for a while, making a set of "flush grab" pliers specifically for these little data-plate rivets, so knowing I was going to be playing with the Hardinge motor this weekend, I found a set of good quality linesman's pliers at the secondhand store.

    The cutting edges had been damaged by someone trying to cut hard wire or nails or something, and they only cost $1.98 from the bin at the store.

    Some of the rivets used are hardened, and I can see chipping or denting the edges at some point. But there's enough meat to grind 'em again a couple times, and if they ever wear out completely, a few bucks and an hour or two of work again...

    Let me know what you think.

    Doc.
    Last edited by Doc Nickel; 05-21-2021, 10:32 PM.
    Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

  • #2
    Ya, I have a set of flush cutting diagonal pliers that work the same way. Gotta keep the inevitable burrs under control to avoid damage to the badge.
    I cut it off twice; it's still too short
    Oregon, USA

    Comment


    • #3
      Those end-cutters that glass workers use have worked well for me. Get the smallest ones you can find, grind across the end til the edges are flush to the end. Put a small hole in a piece of paper and set that over the rivet. Now you can clamp onto the head of the rivet within 3 thou or so of the surface without marking the surface.

      Those rivets have a steep spiral flute on them, so it would help to know which way to spin the cutter as you draw it out. Once you get it started, switch to vise grips to pull it out. I could be wrong, but I think the spiral is the same direction as a regular screw, so it's lefty loosy.
      I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Doc Nickel View Post
        Used a lot of different methods over the years, finally decided I'd try this one.



        I've been wanting to do this for a while, making a set of "flush grab" pliers specifically for these little data-plate rivets, so knowing I was going to be playing with the Hardinge motor this weekend, I found a set of good quality linesman's pliers at the secondhand store.

        The cutting edges had been damaged by someone trying to cut hard wire or nails or something, and they only cost $1.98 from the bin at the store.

        Some of the rivets used are hardened, and I can see chipping or denting the edges at some point. But there's enough meat to grind 'em again a couple times, and if they ever wear out completely, a few bucks and an hour or two of work again...

        Let me know what you think.

        Doc.
        I think that's a great idea Doc. I have a few plates that I need to remove and some equipment I'm restoring. The plates are in perfect condition and I'd hate to damage them.
        ​​​​​​ I have an old pair of tile nippers and some old stainless dental pliers. They just need a little grinding, contouring and sharpening.

        JL.....

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by darryl View Post
          Those end-cutters that glass workers use have worked well for me. Get the smallest ones you can find, grind across the end til the edges are flush to the end. Put a small hole in a piece of paper and set that over the rivet. Now you can clamp onto the head of the rivet within 3 thou or so of the surface without marking the surface.

          Those rivets have a steep spiral flute on them, so it would help to know which way to spin the cutter as you draw it out. Once you get it started, switch to vise grips to pull it out. I could be wrong, but I think the spiral is the same direction as a regular screw, so it's lefty loosy.
          I believe counterclockwise is the way they want to come out. I like the idea of paper to protect the badge, I was thinking maybe .001 brass shim stock.

          JL.....

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Doc Nickel View Post

            Let me know what you think.

            Doc.
            I think that was time and money well spent. Nice workmanship. Thank you for posting that video.

            Comment


            • #7
              Doc, did you design your tool to bite the side of the pin head or to work it's way under the head?? I've seen a lot of variations on the heads of these drive pins. Some heads are smaller than others while the pin itself is the same size. Some heads are a lower profile, so to speak, some sit higher and appear to have a sight flat edge that makes it easier to grab. Or some being more spherical than others. In the past I've been able to remove some with a new pair of vise grips that have a sharp square jaw edge. My other methods include tapping the pin head from side to side to loosen it somewhat and pushing a razor blade under the tag to help lift it followed by a thin putty knife. I've always managed to get most of them out like this but there were a few that I had to grind the heads off. That's risky ! I've also pressed the tags between two ground plates of steel to flatten them out and remove any edge imperfections, providing the tags Don't have raised letters.
              Follow up with a file to the edges. Sometimes you get lucky if the casting is thing and the pin hole is a through hole. I've even located the hole on the back side of the casting and drilled a small hole so the pin could be tapped out, that providing the casting isn't an oil reservoir like the head stock of a lathe.

              JL................

              Comment


              • #8
                You know, the holes for the rivets are usually thru, so all you have to do is punch them out from the other side. They are called "drive screws", and the twist is the same as a regular screw. If you punch them out, you can reuse them, as they are not damaged. McMaster sells them, as do other machinist supply houses.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I have some inexpensive catfish skinning pliers that have the jaw edges right at the outermost surfaces. They're made in China and not of high quality steel, so obviously wouldn't stand much abuse, but they do permit gripping right up against a surface like that.
                  Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Doc, i think your modification video was excellent..
                    I have tried many different methods as well and the best (to me ) is to grind a slot
                    with a Dremel Tool thin cutoff wheel and 'unscrew" the drive screw.
                    Years ago I bought extra drive screws to have on hand for replacements.
                    Doc's method allows reuse of the original screw
                    Rich
                    Green Bay, WI

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Nice job on a good idea. Those things can be such a pita so I'll tuck that idea away.
                      in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Cat's paw always worked.
                        Don't risk starting a grass fire either.
                        Len

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by SLK001 View Post
                          You know, the holes for the rivets are usually thru, so all you have to do is punch them out from the other side. They are called "drive screws", and the twist is the same as a regular screw. If you punch them out, you can reuse them, as they are not damaged. McMaster sells them, as do other machinist supply houses.
                          No always. It depends on the thickness of the casting. Like I stated in my above post.
                          !/4" to maybe 1/2" thick castings may be through holes but any thicker than that it's doubtful such as the tags on the end of my lathe bed, which is about 1" thick or so.

                          JL.............

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Yes, great job on a great idea. 🙂
                            Mike

                            My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I have the big brother of this tool...

                              https://www.amazon.com/Engineers-scr...1&keywords=nej i+saurus+pliers&qid=1621704796&sprefix=neiji+sau%2 Caps%2C208&sr=8-9

                              and it really grips screwheads well. It's too big for the typical drive screw but this smaller one might work well.
                              Regards, Marv

                              Home Shop Freeware - Tools for People Who Build Things
                              http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

                              Location: LA, CA, USA

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X