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Removing those little data-plate rivets...

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  • #16
    These are the best ones I have found. They come individually, or in a set. If the link doesn't work go to Amazon and look for "Vampliers" VamPLIERS® 8" Pro Lineman's Screw Extraction Pliers
    https://www.amazon.com/vdp/ec00c8750...duct=B072K9P85 4&ref=cm_sw_em_r_ib_dt_6KJCTdJaKBL1F
    Fred Townroe

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    • #17
      Originally posted by ftownroe View Post
      These are the best ones I have found. They come individually, or in a set. If the link doesn't work go to Amazon and look for "Vampliers" VamPLIERS® 8" Pro Lineman's Screw Extraction Pliers
      https://www.amazon.com/vdp/ec00c8750...duct=B072K9P85 4&ref=cm_sw_em_r_ib_dt_6KJCTdJaKBL1F
      That was a great video presentation !

      JL.............

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      • #18
        I just order a pair of those vampliers, clever design. I think though for escutcheon pins Docs tool looks superior. Vamps look like they will work on a screw, but the pins often have a very shallow dome with little material to grab
        in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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        • #19
          What is the reason for removing a data plate?

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Bented View Post
            What is the reason for removing a data plate?
            -In this particular case, two reasons:

            One, I'm repainting the machine, and I prefer the look of a plate that's been removed and reinstalled over the paint, rather than masked off.

            And two, as you can see, the motor plate is badly worn, with all the printed artwork basically rubbed off by many years of cutting fluids, cleaning solvents and general mishandling.

            I tend to be a little OCD ("a little?!?", some of you exclaim ) and will be making new plates, either etched or silkscreened or just masked and painted, either way.

            I reinstall the plates using tiny 2-56 or 4-40 stainless button-head screws, so getting the entire rivet out and saving the hole- to be retapped- is important.

            Doc.
            Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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            • #21
              As someone who has been following your work for close to 20 years now, (!?!!?) I have to say well done with the video. Is this going to be a recurring thing now? awesome
              -paul

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              • #22
                A nice modification Doc., well done. Were the rivets re-usable?

                Sarge41
                Last edited by sarge41; 05-24-2021, 01:35 PM.

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                • #23
                  In this case, no. They turned out to be brass "nails"- not the usual steel high-helix drive screws. The pliers mashed 'em good.

                  But I almost never reinstall with rivets- I tend to tap the holes to 2-56 or 4-40 and use tiny stainless button-head allen screws.

                  Doc.
                  Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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                  • #24
                    I just had to bring this thread back up to give a shout out to ftownroe's recommendation for VamPliers. I had not heard of them, but I have ordered and received a pair now (the Brute model) and couldn't be happier.

                    Granted, this is not a tool for everyday use, not even close. But it would have been very handy countless times in the past, and I'm just sorry it found its way to me so late (I'm 72). The main thing is that the pliers are just NICE, which is a hard-to-find quality in today's Chinese- and Mexican-made tools. They may work OK, but the pride of ownership is just not there.

                    Thanks for the suggestion! It's not quite lunchtime. I think I'll go fondle them again.

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                    • #25
                      Well done Doc. I use a similar commercial made tool called an end-nip which has been profiled on the end to provide a flush cut/grip. My father was a shoe repairman and used end-nip pliers to peel the soles off shoes and boot so I had exposure at an early age. Mine certainly cost more than $1.98 and then I still had to profile the end for true flush cut/grip. Nicely done. I'm going to try and visit you this summer when things slow down a bit.
                      Ron

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by SLK001 View Post
                        You know, the holes for the rivets are usually thru, so all you have to do is punch them out from the other side. They are called "drive screws", and the twist is the same as a regular screw. If you punch them out, you can reuse them, as they are not damaged. McMaster sells them, as do other machinist supply houses.
                        I did exactly that when I refurbished my 1950 Doall ML vertical bandsaw,the Varnamo Mill was a no go as rivets were in blind holes and severely tight so Badges got masked off for repainting.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Doc Nickel View Post
                          Used a lot of different methods over the years, finally decided I'd try this one.



                          I've been wanting to do this for a while, making a set of "flush grab" pliers specifically for these little data-plate rivets, so knowing I was going to be playing with the Hardinge motor this weekend, I found a set of good quality linesman's pliers at the secondhand store.

                          The cutting edges had been damaged by someone trying to cut hard wire or nails or something, and they only cost $1.98 from the bin at the store.

                          Some of the rivets used are hardened, and I can see chipping or denting the edges at some point. But there's enough meat to grind 'em again a couple times, and if they ever wear out completely, a few bucks and an hour or two of work again...

                          Let me know what you think.

                          Doc.
                          The tool you made looks a whole lot like the cheap flush nipping pliers in my toolbox. I have used those with some success removing drive screws.

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                          • #28
                            Chalk up another one for being prompted to buy the Vampliers from Amazon. I thought Doc Nickel did a great job making his tool, but if I can buy my way out of it - I'm going to. I know I shouldn't admit it here, but there: "I said it". Don't worry, I still spend ridiculous amounts of time and effort machining things of little consequence. My current tasks involve taking imported camera tripods and trying to replace any components that are magnetic. Something about surveying caves with a BRIC4 device. https://www.caveexploration.org/gear/bric4
                            Last edited by Jim Caudill; 06-08-2021, 12:40 AM.
                            JHC Dayton, OH

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