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How much PSI can Beer Keg handle.

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  • How much PSI can Beer Keg handle.

    As title says was curious how much Air Pressure a Beer Keg can safely handle?

  • #2
    My first wild gut feeling would be 100-150 psi probably ok. I’d head for the hills at 250.

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    • #3
      I believe such a marking is reqd by law?
      1973 SB 10K .
      BenchMaster mill.

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      • #4
        Ooh I detect somthing dangerous
        https://www.labtesting.com/wp-conten...Burst-Test.pdf

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        • #5
          Way too much time on my hands, but as beer is dear to my heart:

          The usual pressure for the gasification/delivery of beer is around 15 psi.

          It seems that for pressure testing, a keg is measured in certain places, then brought up to 90 psi, held for a short period, the pressure relieved, and the same points measured again. There should be no permanent deformation as a result of this test. Make of that what you will......

          See page 32 for details:

          https://www.brewersassociation.org/a...lable_Kegs.pdf



          HTH, Ian
          Last edited by IanPendle; 06-05-2021, 03:01 AM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by boslab View Post
            Huh, well thats an interesting paper. Kinda surprised that the smaller ones have a higher burst pressure than the larger ones (1500psi vs 850psi, for anybody wondering), wonder why that is. Less surface area for the pressure to act on? Ill leave that to the sciency types to explain

            Personally, im always amazed to fing our how much force a properly welded joint can deal with. Probably has something to do with the fact that my welds can be broken with a particularly wet fart...

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            • #7
              My 5 gallon corny kegs are marked at 130psi. I imagine anything past that and you'll start blowing the o-rings rather quickly, not sure what burst pressure would be. Also be aware that a lot (but not all) corny kegs have some sort of pressure relief valve in the lid to prevent overpressure.
              Cayuga, Ontario, Canada

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              • #8
                Originally posted by epicfail48 View Post

                Huh, well thats an interesting paper. Kinda surprised that the smaller ones have a higher burst pressure than the larger ones (1500psi vs 850psi, for anybody wondering), wonder why that is. Less surface area for the pressure to act on? Ill leave that to the sciency types to explain

                Personally, im always amazed to fing our how much force a properly welded joint can deal with. Probably has something to do with the fact that my welds can be broken with a particularly wet fart...
                Not really a big mystery. Tubing works the same way. Small diameter tube running at up around 3K psi typically has a pretty thin wall while larger ID tubing at the same pressure needs a far thicker wall. Look at the specs for any of the Schedule number pipe classes. Each class is good for a given pressure value. And in each class the wall thickness for smaller ID's is quite thin and goes up rapidly for the bigger ID sizes.

                I recall seeing the reason in the way the tensile force in a pipe works in relation to the ID. But it's been a while since I saw the equations and explanation.

                But assuming the two sizes use the same thickness material to make stock keeping easier then it's no mystery why the smaller size will have a higher burst strength. And this would apply even if the burst is at the top dome for the same reasons. But instead of a cylinder shape we're looking at a section of a sphere. Still related to the same inner diameter and how the material is loaded in tension though.
                Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                • #9
                  I bet there is somebody on youtube doing demonstrations. The tubing for common rail diesels runs at 20000psi or more, it is not particularly thick walled, but it is only about 1/4" od, the small surface area is the reason for its strength.

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                  • #10
                    I had a dream about beer "again" last night - a huge liquor store i was in and met a girl looking for a micro brew herself, we kinda teamed up and were trying to help each other out - then found out we were going to the same mountain pub after - for what else other than more beer...

                    it's so damn nice to be sleeping again...

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                    • #11
                      epicfail48
                      Barlows formula

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by BCRider View Post

                        Not really a big mystery. Tubing works the same way. Small diameter tube running at up around 3K psi typically has a pretty thin wall while larger ID tubing at the same pressure needs a far thicker wall. Look at the specs for any of the Schedule number pipe classes. Each class is good for a given pressure value. And in each class the wall thickness for smaller ID's is quite thin and goes up rapidly for the bigger ID sizes.

                        I recall seeing the reason in the way the tensile force in a pipe works in relation to the ID. But it's been a while since I saw the equations and explanation.

                        But assuming the two sizes use the same thickness material to make stock keeping easier then it's no mystery why the smaller size will have a higher burst strength. And this would apply even if the burst is at the top dome for the same reasons. But instead of a cylinder shape we're looking at a section of a sphere. Still related to the same inner diameter and how the material is loaded in tension though.
                        Very simple equation actually. Stress scales linearly with diameter.

                        Click image for larger version

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                        Same thing whydontu posted, just rearranged. I'd never heard of that Barlow's formula before, but I guess I didn't totally need it knowing the one above.
                        21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                        1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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                        • #13
                          Not pressure but I’ve had one down to 10-6 Torr.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
                            I had a dream about beer "again" last night - a huge liquor store i was in and met a girl looking for a micro brew herself, we kinda teamed up and were trying to help each other out - then found out we were going to the same mountain pub after - for what else other than more beer...

                            it's so damn nice to be sleeping again...
                            Just cracked a new keg of west coast IPA after working on a roof all day. Let me tell you, that goes down smooth and hits the spot.
                            Cayuga, Ontario, Canada

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                            • #15
                              AK.. JUST DRINK a whole SWACK of Beer, then you can sleep better.. just dont beat up your former freinds , before getting sleepy....

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