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How much PSI can Beer Keg handle.

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  • #16
    Wasn`t Barlow the vampire in one of Stephen King`s books?
    Brian Rupnow
    Design engineer
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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    • #17
      Short story I think-“The Night Flyer”....

      Worlds worst writer that I still can’t put down.

      My simple minded way of explaining “hoop stress” is: Circumference goes up 3.1415....times faster than Diameter.

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      • #18
        If you have a spare empty, make an attachment for a 0 to 2000 lb pressure gauge, fill it to the very top with cold water, seal it absolutely tight, put it out on a hot sunny day, sit ai a deck chair, drink your drink of choice and watch the gauge rise. If it does burst you might get wet, thats all. Regards David Powell.

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        • #19
          I figured the beer keg would take decent pressure, since I make 2-litre soda bottle into water rockets pump them up to 70psi and let 'em fly

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          • #20
            This Keg is a InterBrew made in Belgium 50 litre,only marking are 3.6 bar and 5.6 bar.It was in scrap metal at Dump so it was priced right.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Tom S View Post
              My 5 gallon corny kegs are marked at 130psi. I imagine anything past that and you'll start blowing the o-rings rather quickly, not sure what burst pressure would be. Also be aware that a lot (but not all) corny kegs have some sort of pressure relief valve in the lid to prevent overpressure.
              Welding instructor used to beat it into us that our welds are only acceptable if they are stronger than the base material. When we put our samples on the strain test and started pulling we should see the break start to form away from the weld-base area. Needless to say, I didn't seek my fortune as a welder.

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              • #22
                Very Nice! Hats off to you Sir,,, JR
                My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by David Powell View Post
                  If you have a spare empty, make an attachment for a 0 to 2000 lb pressure gauge, fill it to the very top with cold water, seal it absolutely tight, put it out on a hot sunny day, sit ai a deck chair, drink your drink of choice and watch the gauge rise. If it does burst you might get wet, that's all. Regards David Powell.
                  David do you remember John Chappell's propane bottle experiment? He related it probably 25 ago years at a TSME meeting - back when we met at a lecture hall at 999 Queen W. (for those not familiar, that's the Toronto Lunatic Asylum build in the mid 1800's) An apropos venue!.

                  For those not in attendance, John related a tale of a destructive experiment involving a small propane cylinder, the kind the hardware stores sells for use with a torch. He attached a pressure gauge, dug a hole in a vacant lot and built a fire in it. With some water in the tank, it was placed in the fire with the gauge sticking up. Retreating to a safe distance, John watched the gauge. Apparently the BOOM was so loud it brought people out of their houses and distributed shrapnel over quite an area. The only thing for John to do was join in the speculation over what just happened. I think remember him saying the pressure was 2200 or 2300 psi
                  in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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                  • #24
                    John Chappell was a wonderful asset to our group. Often experimenting, always creative, and always giving help, encouragement and advice in a kindly gentlemanly fashion.
                    Nearly all presentations include much valuable information which members will use and recall.
                    Only a few are memorable in themselves. John,s presentations were usually memorable., both for their content and presentation.
                    Regards David Powell.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Tundra Twin Track View Post
                      This Keg is a InterBrew made in Belgium 50 litre,only marking are 3.6 bar and 5.6 bar.It was in scrap metal at Dump so it was priced right.

                      I brew beer. I lauger and Ale. I am a friend of the Beer making... A little bit.. `

                      I do All Grain. No sugar, adjuncts or extracts.

                      I put them in 5 gallon kegs. I had 20 in full serve at one time.

                      They all have blow off valves as do the commercial kegs.

                      Dont try to use one as a pressurized vessel!! JR
                      My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                      https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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                      • #26
                        Click image for larger version

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ID:	1945802 Can’t sleep, so I’m drinking coffee waiting for the sun to come up so I can get back to work, so I’ll kill a little time and tell my beer keg story....

                        During my late high school early college phase my younger brothers, a couple buddies, and I built and raced the “Mud Toad” mud bogger in my Dads shop. “SDM Racing” was an extraordinarily low budget organization, but we did print a handful of team T shirts our second year in.

                        We’d scrounged a beer keg to add that touch of class and serve as the fuel tank. Dad saw what we were up to and muttered something about “ you guys are gonna go up in flames”, and took over that piece of the project. An hour or so later he handed us our keg with a 90* sweep and filler cap welded into the fill port. Laying down the keg could only be filled half full, but it also couldn’t leak fuel if we rolled over.

                        These pictures were taken last summer when my kids traveled back home to see my family. My brothers and nephews had dusted off the Toad for part of the entertainment and our boys recreated a 30 year old picture of my brothers and I.




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                        • #27
                          I used to work with HDPE SDR pipe. SDR means Standard Diameter Ratio. So SDR11 pipe has a wall thickness 1/11 of pipe diameter for all sizes. So all sizes have the exact same pressure rating. Makes a whole lot of sense compared to Sch10, Sch40, Sch80 etc.

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                          • #28
                            67 belches per deciliter.
                            You do the math.
                            Len

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                            • #29
                              Oh rats, you beat me to it on the fart test. Now I have no further interest in this thread.

                              Oh, I suspect that the differences between the ratings of small and larger kegs may be due to the larger surface area or perhaps the larger radius of the mostly flat ends. There would be a stress riser at the junction of those ends and the cylindrical body of the keg and the larger ends would flex more.

                              Lets see, the diameter doubles so the length of the weld around the circumference doubles. But the area of the end goes up by the square so four times for my example; therefore there is four times as much force on the end of the larger keg while the weld is only twice as long so each inch or mm of the weld has to withstand twice as much shearing force. Yep, that computes. And I did not even have to bring that flexing into it.

                              Where are the Myth Busters when you need them? Bursting beer kegs, I LOVE it. Up there with the water heater launching but not quite equal to the exploding cement truck, much of which still has not been found.



                              Originally posted by epicfail48 View Post

                              Huh, well thats an interesting paper. Kinda surprised that the smaller ones have a higher burst pressure than the larger ones (1500psi vs 850psi, for anybody wondering), wonder why that is. Less surface area for the pressure to act on? Ill leave that to the sciency types to explain

                              Personally, im always amazed to fing our how much force a properly welded joint can deal with. Probably has something to do with the fact that my welds can be broken with a particularly wet fart...
                              Paul A.
                              SE Texas

                              And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                              You will find that it has discrete steps.

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