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Flux cored mig wire

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  • Flux cored mig wire

    Just some questions about above .
    i hear it welds galvanised better
    is it any better outside with a gentle breeze than normal wire
    Does 0.6mm flux core perform the same on thin car panels as 0.6mm non flux core as regards burning holes through etc
    what changes do i have to make to my machine .

    all the best..mark

  • #2
    Galvanized welds better if you remove the galvanizing first. The flux has zero to do with that.
    Flux core takes a lot more heat to burn the wire properly, so I don't think it would be very good on car panels.
    Solid 0,5mm wire with argon is best for car panels IMHO.
    25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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    • #3
      A professional welder told me that for outdoor in any sort of breeze that the better options are either flux core or good old stick. Any of the gas shielded processes won't work in anything but total dead to VERY mild wind. The gas envelope is too easily blown away. Although with higher flow rates and some welding screens around the position as wind breaks I suppose it would tolerate a little more wind.

      This was later brought up in a few of the flux core welding videos on YT as well.

      Outside of that I'm not the person to say anything about welding car panels.
      Chilliwack BC, Canada

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      • #4
        what nickel and BC said above and for thin sheet metal panels you will have better results by skip welding or spot welding using gas shielded vs fluxcore. Less distortion, less burn thru. (spot welding I mean multiple tack welds in a variable pattern) Jim

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        • #5
          YEAH the wind is always at it here ..
          fellow on you tube demonstrates that flux core is better for galvanised

          My problem ..yes you can grind the galv off ..but panels are galvanised both sides and when it gets hot on the concealed other side, eruptions take place - carries on burning like a magnesium for 1/2 second after stopped.

          on another note ..thinking about going complete flux core ..as gas is now £79 a year for rental of bottle, plus over £50 to exchange for full one .

          correction . now £141 per year - £70 was what it was 10 years ago

          This bottle ive had for over 10 years ..still hasn't run out and i've paid over £700 in rental for it .

          Now then, no ones answered what i need to do to convert ..are the rollers the same on the drive..........is the tip the same.

          Is 0.6 wire actually 0.6 ..or is it larger to accommodate the flux .

          yeah no all the techniques for welding thin ..just don't know anything about flux core .

          i do know that its a lot cheaper than when first introduced - so looks very appealing now
          Last edited by aboard_epsilon; 06-08-2021, 03:40 PM.

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          • #6
            I completely understand the situation regarding the wind and the expense.
            The wire and rollers and tips are the same size regardless of flux core or solid.
            If the other side is concealed then there's not much that can be done about it, but i always prefer to remove galvanize where possible.
            Vinegar can do for that.
            Hydrocloric acid is best, the residue of the acid forms zinc chloride which is useful for a solder flux.

            Flux core in an application like yours is far from what I would want to do, but if it's what you have under adverse conditions, it can indeed be done.
            25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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            • #7
              Solid wire is best for thin panels. You can turn the heat down to avoid burn through, and with a straight noble gas like argon you will get a cleaner weld.

              In a slight breeze the flux core works better than with gas. I've found that under some conditions I would have to turn up the gas flow enough to get a clean weld that it would start to blow the arc puddle around a bit. Had to put up a mini wind barrier, which can be a pain depending on the overall setup.

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              • #8
                Hydrocloric acid , if using this you have to neutralise with bicarbonate of soda . other wise youll get rust to the extreme afterwards

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                • #9
                  Solid wire is the best for a smooth weld. Flux core was very unpleasant for me. I needed something that when the weld was milled down, there would be no undercut or rough patches. I still have most of my first roll of flux core. It does make a good door stop. Speaking about welding anything with zinc on it, don't. Very unhealthy. I worked as a maintenance mechanic in a plant that produced galvanized guardrail that is used along highways and had to repair (welding) frames that went thru acid tanks and then into the zinc tank. Bad work is the only description I can think of.
                  Sarge41

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                  • #10
                    I sent my BOC and air products bottles back, it was costing a fortune as said, I have the no deposit ones now but you don’t get as much out!
                    they aren’t 300 bar that’s for certain, flux core isn’t too bad outside, still a messy process ( it also helps if you fit the right rollers to the mig, the toothy ones, I didn’t, it was bloody awful till I twigged) I haven’t tried thin stuff so can’t help, but it’s tolerable on med sheet
                    mark

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by aboard_epsilon View Post
                      on another note ..thinking about going complete flux core ..as gas is now £79 a year for rental of bottle, plus over £50 to exchange for full one .

                      correction . now £141 per year - £70 was what it was 10 years ago

                      This bottle ive had for over 10 years ..still hasn't run out and i've paid over £700 in rental for it .
                      I had the same problem with the Bloody Oxygen Company (sic). I now use Hobbyweld, who do a cylinder deposit and bring it back when you want a refill or bring the original receipt and cylinder back if your executors/descendants want the money back. Problem is that the nearest agent for you seems to be in Wrexham.

                      On the other hand, you'd only need to go there for new bottles.

                      As to MIG welding outside on thing gauge metal. My best suggestion would be to use a lot of plastic sheet to make a tent or wait for a completely windless day. I've done it, but wasn't proud of the results.
                      Location- Rugby, Warwickshire. UK

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                      • #12
                        People continue to regard flux core as "cheap crap" for those who can afford no better..... But it's a legit process.

                        We did both in class. Both work. You do use reverse polarity for flux core, in general (wire -), but it's fine. I've done a reasonable amount of it since class, and got good results building frames for test stands etc.

                        ALL fluxed processes are "messy", so that's no big deal. Don't like it? Go inside and use tig or mig, instead of FCAW (IIRC that is the correct name).
                        2730

                        Keep eye on ball.
                        Hashim Khan


                        It's just a box of rain, I don't know who put it there.

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                        • #13
                          Yes, in fact a good deal of structural (I-beam) contracts are done with flux core. I started out in a boiler shop that used flux core and submerged arc. Of course those applications are able to make use of the FCAW process to its fullest capabilities: with hi powered machines giving full penetration from one side on materials well over 3/8" (10mm) thick.

                          The OP won't be able to do that on his sheet metal, making full use of flux core will simply not be possible.
                          Some of the mess can be overcome with some cooking spray. No kidding, PAM cooking spray all over the area prior to welding. It doesn't stop the bigger globs but it does make cleanup easier.

                          Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                          People continue to regard flux core as "cheap crap" for those who can afford no better..... But it's a legit process.

                          We did both in class. Both work. You do use reverse polarity for flux core, in general (wire -), but it's fine. I've done a reasonable amount of it since class, and got good results building frames for test stands etc.

                          ALL fluxed processes are "messy", so that's no big deal. Don't like it? Go inside and use tig or mig, instead of FCAW (IIRC that is the correct name).
                          25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                          • #14
                            Go by your manual for the wheel size and type. I know that my 3 in 1 machine came with a few sets of rollers. And on the inside of the door to load the spools is a chart on which rollers to use with what type of wire.
                            Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                            • #15
                              The serrated wheels are the ones you want for FC.
                              25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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