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Machines and workbenches on wheels?

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  • #31
    Currently on wheels:
    4x6 band saw
    8x24 bandsaw project in progress
    Atlas MFC MIll
    Small welding table
    Welders
    Couple of vice & milling tool carts.
    Table saw
    14" wood bandsaw
    14" vertical metal bandsaw project in progress

    Lathes, drill presses, workbenches, mill drill, shaper not on wheels.

    Were on wheels, but got rid of to make room for more frequently used tools: Jointer, Dust collector.

    It's a squeeze getting around anyway but it's usually just the carts that need to move. I'll probably thin the bandsaw herd when they are all working.

    Judging from TTT's last photo (post #24), squeezing machinery into a tiny shop is not his motivation.
    Last edited by mickeyf; 06-15-2021, 10:39 PM.
    "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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    • #32
      Originally posted by mickeyf View Post

      Judging from TTT's last photo (post #24), squeezing machinery into a tiny shop is not his motivation.
      At times there’s a lot of Empty Floor Space,but Agricultural Equipment cobbles up space in a hurry.It changes from season to season🙂

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      • #33
        Originally posted by ezduzit View Post

        It's an 18" x 51" Okuma LS built in 1968. 10 hp 3-phase, which required the installation of a new Amercan Rotary AD20 phase converter. Bought it on Offerup from a local small business that was relocating. And had a professional rigger (GMC--very good guy to deal with) move it the 30 miles for me. Here is a good link to some more info on the Okuma, a very highly regarded line from Japan. Like Monarch, the company is still in business.

        http://www.lathes.co.uk/okuma/

        Added photos of as-found condition and moving into the shop (those mobile bases to the rescue again).
        Congratulations on that one! Yes, the Okuma has long been held as the Japanese equivalent of the Monarch when it comes to quality, and it looks like you've got a fine example of one. Next up we need to see pictures/videos of the Okuma making chips. And interesting parts, too.

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        • #34
          Works fine, had to add two stabilizer Jack's to get the rock out.
          now I can clean / move it / work on it with ease. Click image for larger version

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          • #35
            Originally posted by tom_d View Post

            Congratulations on that one! Yes, the Okuma has long been held as the Japanese equivalent of the Monarch when it comes to quality, and it looks like you've got a fine example of one. Next up we need to see pictures/videos of the Okuma making chips. And interesting parts, too.
            I looked at a Okuma before I got my 18x60 Mazak Clone,Okuma are very nice Machine

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            • #36
              Wimpy workbenches lead to wimpy work.

              Click image for larger version

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              • #37
                I can totally understand your point. For some years my SB-9 was in my trailer shop and it was probably as bad, if not worse than any ship's machine shop. You talk about three point support, I think I had about one and a half, at best. I could see changes if I just shifted my position on the chair I sat in. I made a good many parts with it, but that does not include two foot long shafts.

                It is presently sitting on a solid (?) concrete garage floor. I haven't done the leveling/straigthtening bit yet, but I plan to. Still making shorter parts.

                And I can see the reasons for having a shop on wheels. In my case, the last thing I would add wheels to is the lathe. And my main work bench would be second-to-last. My main bench sits in the middle of the room and I went to a lot of trouble making it steady enough to allow me to apply force to things in the vise on that bench. I would not want to lose that stability.



                Originally posted by ezduzit View Post

                Seems to be a sudden loss of imagination going around these days.

                Lathes built like the Monarch 10EE, that have a massively rigid 3-point base support, are unaffected by unevenness of the floor when supported at these three points.
                Paul A.
                SE Texas

                And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                You will find that it has discrete steps.

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