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  • #16
    3D printer, lathe and milling machine … wherever you imagination takes you …. 😎

    Designed in DesignSpark and printed on Creality CR10 in carbon filled nylon and delrin. Some machined components as well. That component at right top is a cover that encloses the mechanism. Gears designed from scratch, right from the involute curves.


    Click image for larger version

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    • #17

      Final product ….

      Click image for larger version

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      • #18
        Change gears from Mod1 to 14DP. Plastic gear not good enough for you? I printed a 73 hole index plate so no need to use differential indexing for higher primes.
        You can print an entire G1 loco except for motor and axles.
        Have you searched this forum? Late 2019 a thread reported gears at about 32DP and backgear for a SouthBend.
        5C collet thread too fine. Invent your own and matching drawbar nut. Print square and hex ones, even pentagonal. Don't get prissey about it not being perfect for your usual machining to tenths, just use when appropriate.
        Sure it is a big investment for a two dollar knob but did you really need that two ton milling machine for making a half inch square hole in that plastic box rather than file it?

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Stu View Post

          I would think a 5C collet would be out of the question, you might be able to print very fine threads for the closer, but they would have no strength. and probably pulI out when tightening it.

          have an Ender3 V2 as well and while I like it a lot and it is a very good printer for the price, I had to put about $150 worth of upgrades to allow it to print consistently. If I were to buy another it would be something like a Prusa I3 mark3.
          I think the idea was an emergency 5C collet, not a collet closer. If you have a 5C setup but are missing a size you need badly and right now, the 3D printed would probably work. Just be aware that it isn't steel and it isn't for long term usage.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by loose nut View Post
            ]Most people seem to print out figurines, toys etc. as their main use but that isn't anything I would do.
            yeah, most people don't know what to print...but most don't know how to run a lathe or have one either. I it is a bit humorous that so much of the advertising is showing figurines....like its a solution looking for a problem.

            But....thats not the case with shop! We're always having to make and design stuff. Here's a small sampling of things I've done. Add in pattern making, creating lost was patterns etc and the sky is the limit. I'm this close to buying and SLA printer, high res, to get even better results (but am choking on the LCD costs, which is a consumable)

            It just opens up so many possibilities. Also no, with semi hollow fills (see first pic) you can create some amazingly light and strong items that wouldn't be possibly any other way….and do so while you sleep





            Encoder bracket



            Stackable trays for rifflers & needle files, made tons of these



            Lathe speed control – rheostat holder so as to use the lathes original dial to control a VFD




            Lots of parts for this sinker EDM



            Electronics enclosure



            Soft bearing dynamic balancer


            Last edited by Mcgyver; 06-14-2021, 03:06 PM.
            in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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            • #21
              Even if you just go to www.thingiverse.com and look at the million items people have uploaded to print and just print those things it would be worth it. But the real fun is
              designing something in any of the CAD programs (fusion 360 for me) and have the printer make it. I tried for years to learn ANY of the CAD programs and just never
              could but finally found a couple Youtube vids of guys that really hold your hand and now I can do simple stuff and it's the most rewarding thing i have done in a long time.

              If you do decide to buy one, talk with us about your choices, although now a days I don't think you can buy a bad printer, they got it down pretty good.

              John Titor, when are you.

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              • #22
                Hi,

                Nylon 5C emergency collets are widely available. I would perhaps choose to use PETG as it's a bit more flexible than the only slightly cheaper but more brittle PLA. I would consider thicker inside and outside walls with maybe 20% - 30% infill max.

                Like a home machine shop, uses of a home 3D printer are only limited to your imagination and what you can conjure up. From support of metal shop projects, (someone posted videos of using 3D printed punches and dies of bend metals up to 10ga mild steel), to personal ideas. I have made everything from prototype motorcycle handlebars and 4 wheeler accessories for commercial use to phone holders to a cover for my Glencairn glass of whisk(e)y to cheap toys for keeping grade school kids highly interested in doing well at math quizzes to educational props for learning impaired children. Except for the motorcycle and 4 wheeler prototypes, all of this was done in the past year at home in my dining room. And for many, it's a cheap and safe intro into CNC machining. Mistakes mostly just cost a bit of time and a few pennies of wasted filament rather than $1000's in damaged parts and broken tooling if you screw up.

                Just like learning to run a lathe or mill, there are learning curves to go through. From 3D CAD, (very applicable and useful to any machine shop endeavor), to using the slicer to troubleshooting print issues. But like this forum, there are more than one forum to seek help from for each problem you might encounter.
                If you think you understand what is going on, you haven't been paying attention.

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                • #23
                  mcguyver that dynamic balancer is awesome! Does it have accelerometers attached somewhere to measure vibration? I've only ever done static balancing and thought dynamic balancing was too far out of my wheelhouse to get into researching it...

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
                    mcguyver that dynamic balancer is awesome! Does it have accelerometers attached somewhere to measure vibration? I've only ever done static balancing and thought dynamic balancing was too far out of my wheelhouse to get into researching it...
                    thanks, yes accelerometers. bottom left you can see a tab with four holes - accelerometers get mounted there, one on each pendulum (as I call the swinging part). I flash a high powered led as a triggered strobe and have been able to balance down to 1 gram cm irrc. or was that .1 gram/cm? can't remember but its pretty low. That's the rotor from a tool post grinder I was fine tuning. Still working on the project overall. 3D printing really improved by taking weight out of - less inertia. The Mark I was all metal...scraped in favour of plastic
                    Last edited by Mcgyver; 06-14-2021, 04:37 PM.
                    in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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                    • #25
                      I have my grandsons 3d printer in my office. It is a Wanhao PowerSpec installed on a drawer slide in a 2 door metal cabinet. There is a large activated charcoal filter with a fan inside to get rid of the ABS smell. The cabinet helps keep it warm which helps with the ABS.

                      The printer has suddenly stopped working and I haven’t found the cause. All axis move and it properly runs the bed leveling routine. However when you start a program the bed and the extruder heat to the proper temperatures, then it fails to start printing. Nothing moves and temperatures fall right off. Tried lots of different programs, different memory cards. I took it apart and looked for loose wires, overheated connections etc. but found nothing. Any ideas?

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                      • #26
                        As I used the fast button on my mill's power feed I knocked my water glass on the floor. I am thinking about 3-D printing a cup holder for the mill. And perhaps a second one for the lathe.

                        Many, MANY other uses.
                        Paul A.
                        SE Texas

                        And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                        You will find that it has discrete steps.

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                        • #27
                          This is like asking "milling machine uses".

                          A particular mill will make any part that it is capable of producing.

                          A 3D printer will do the same, buy one that will produce the required parts.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by garyhlucas View Post
                            I have my grandsons 3d printer in my office. It is a Wanhao PowerSpec installed on a drawer slide in a 2 door metal cabinet. There is a large activated charcoal filter with a fan inside to get rid of the ABS smell. The cabinet helps keep it warm which helps with the ABS.

                            The printer has suddenly stopped working and I haven’t found the cause. All axis move and it properly runs the bed leveling routine. However when you start a program the bed and the extruder heat to the proper temperatures, then it fails to start printing. Nothing moves and temperatures fall right off. Tried lots of different programs, different memory cards. I took it apart and looked for loose wires, overheated connections etc. but found nothing. Any ideas?
                            could be a clogged nozzle, could be a bad extruder or extruder stepper or stepper driver

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by garyhlucas View Post
                              I have my grandsons 3d printer in my office. It is a Wanhao PowerSpec installed on a drawer slide in a 2 door metal cabinet. There is a large activated charcoal filter with a fan inside to get rid of the ABS smell. The cabinet helps keep it warm which helps with the ABS.

                              The printer has suddenly stopped working and I haven’t found the cause. All axis move and it properly runs the bed leveling routine. However when you start a program the bed and the extruder heat to the proper temperatures, then it fails to start printing. Nothing moves and temperatures fall right off. Tried lots of different programs, different memory cards. I took it apart and looked for loose wires, overheated connections etc. but found nothing. Any ideas?
                              Take a look at the gcode as well.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Earlier this year, I purchased a Snapmaker 2 (A350 - the large one). Purportedly a decent 3D printer, and the extra features (laser engraver, underpowered CBC router, everything run via CAN bus) were just an excuse to justify the extra $$$.

                                I went through about a month of tweaking, calibrating, etc, and the machine is now sitting idle and has been since late April. The reason for this is that I could not get prints produced to exact dimensions (a 1/4" hole, for example, might be 0.213, or the edges of a dovetail might be 0.010 oversized and therefore not fit the qctp), and the answer to this problem is basically 1) use an enclosure, 2) micromanage the hell outta the filament, 3) add fans fans and more fans. I was just working on the enclosure last night, should have it sufficient for 3-d printing tonight (will still need to add shop-vac ports for the CNC, and laser-sheidling for the engraver), then I will be adding an inline filament drier and machining some mods for the print head to take the bowden tube from the drier and to provide mounts for a fan and a dial indicator.

                                In short: 3D printing is a huge time sink, and the constant refrain on 3D printing forums is "learn, keep learning, learn for months and enjoy your new hobby". I confess that I am not short of hobby, I am short of time, and I specifically purchsed a 3D printer to speed up some work in the shop.

                                Ah, now we get to the topic: what is the printer used for? I use it, or intend to use it, to produce prototypes out of PLA before cutting any metal. This requires an STL file of course, which forces me to pay more attention to the design, but it beats cut-and-fit. I've been using OpenSCAD for the design work, and it's pretty decent if you have a programming bent, but as the projects get more complex projects I will likely start using FreeCAD.

                                Oh, and shop-vac nozzes. You can print custom shop-vac nozzles, It's great. Thinking about making one sized for Bridgeport T-slots which has a coarse mesh at the rear to catch stringers before they clog up the hose.

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