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  • Tom S
    replied
    Has anyone here made tooling for presses and brakes using their 3D printer? That's one aspect that really interests me, being able to trial and make custom tooling out of PLA for a fraction the cost of conventional tooling.

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  • tom_d
    replied
    Originally posted by RMinMN View Post

    Two related thoughts about making the change gears. 1. Unless you are planning to make deep cuts on low thread pitches the plastic gear will probably do just fine. The possible failure would be the keyway to lock two gears together for compound gears. Make a metal bushing for the part with the keyway and that probably goes away. 2. How much would it cost you to make a gear to try out? PLA is fairly strong and quite cheap. Why not give it a try.
    Originally posted by hollo View Post

    Both good points. Hadn't thought of using a metal bushing. I might even make a really big one with a smallish rim of 3d printed teeth that would be quick to change when they wear out. The cost in money is pretty minimal, but it will take some time, so on the list of planned projects to look forwards to for now...
    Can you design the gear so that it sits on a metal rim, maybe with spokes. An old gear of appropriate size where there are a few missing teeth would make a good donor. Machine off the remaining teeth from the rim, then print out the gear "tire" with the needed tooth count and press in place, maybe a few drive pins to help keep it in place.

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  • Dan Dubeau
    replied
    Congrats, welcome to the party. The ender3 is a pretty well sorted platform with a pretty big user base. If you run into any issues it should be pretty easy to get sorted. I almost bought one this past winter but ended up with the kingroon instead, as I didn't want another large footprint machine.

    Leave a comment:


  • loose nut
    replied
    Well I just pulled the trigger and bought one, no more beer money this year. Good thing I don't drink it.

    It is the Creality Ender 3 V2 if that means anything to you. Supposed to be the one with the biggest following, not the best but lots of help available. My son has an older one and it works well for him.

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  • Dan Dubeau
    replied
    Too many uses to count. Latest one was a couple extra bobbins for my wife electric spinning wheel. I printed the gears on my resin printer (elegoo mars), then the end plates on my FDM (kingroon kp3s) and the connecting tube was just some 1/2" copper pipe cut to length. Extra bobbins are about $100 from the company, and I made these ones for about $300 a piece.... Actually I think the printers have long "paid" for themselves, and have been pretty maintenance free so my part costs are way down in price. The bobbins probably cost me about $3 in material and a few hours of overnight unattended printing. There is no price you can put on a happy Wife though.

    As for other uses, casting patterns, jigs/fixtures for metal and woodworking, tool holders for organization, etc, you're only limited by your imagination.

    I doubt you could get away with printing a fully functioning 5c emergency collet, but the problem just needs to be approached from a different angle. You COULD very easily print an insert that fits in a 1" 5c collet, that would work just great, depending on how many parts you had to machine, and the accuracy required. There's no need to print the whole collet, just the business end you need to hold the part you're machining. Saves a lot of printing time and fussing over details (threads) that don't matter.

    That's a common problem I see with people ****ting on 3d printers, is that they try and approach things the same way they would if machining, and deem them useless and child's toys only fit for printing figurines. IMO They're just another useful tool that requires a slightly different approach and designing mindset. I've got great utility out of mine over the years, a very valuable addition to the stable.

    As for mill soft jaws, yes they work for that. Takes a LONG time to print a usable 6" kurt soft jaw though. Not bad if you can schedule it overnight, but as with most things 3d printer related if you need it NOW there might be better options. Again, perhaps taking an "insert" aproach would work best. Only print the unique parts that are needed and make them fit a standard or altered vise jaw.

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  • thin-woodsman
    replied
    Earlier this year, I purchased a Snapmaker 2 (A350 - the large one). Purportedly a decent 3D printer, and the extra features (laser engraver, underpowered CBC router, everything run via CAN bus) were just an excuse to justify the extra $$$.

    I went through about a month of tweaking, calibrating, etc, and the machine is now sitting idle and has been since late April. The reason for this is that I could not get prints produced to exact dimensions (a 1/4" hole, for example, might be 0.213, or the edges of a dovetail might be 0.010 oversized and therefore not fit the qctp), and the answer to this problem is basically 1) use an enclosure, 2) micromanage the hell outta the filament, 3) add fans fans and more fans. I was just working on the enclosure last night, should have it sufficient for 3-d printing tonight (will still need to add shop-vac ports for the CNC, and laser-sheidling for the engraver), then I will be adding an inline filament drier and machining some mods for the print head to take the bowden tube from the drier and to provide mounts for a fan and a dial indicator.

    In short: 3D printing is a huge time sink, and the constant refrain on 3D printing forums is "learn, keep learning, learn for months and enjoy your new hobby". I confess that I am not short of hobby, I am short of time, and I specifically purchsed a 3D printer to speed up some work in the shop.

    Ah, now we get to the topic: what is the printer used for? I use it, or intend to use it, to produce prototypes out of PLA before cutting any metal. This requires an STL file of course, which forces me to pay more attention to the design, but it beats cut-and-fit. I've been using OpenSCAD for the design work, and it's pretty decent if you have a programming bent, but as the projects get more complex projects I will likely start using FreeCAD.

    Oh, and shop-vac nozzes. You can print custom shop-vac nozzles, It's great. Thinking about making one sized for Bridgeport T-slots which has a coarse mesh at the rear to catch stringers before they clog up the hose.

    Leave a comment:


  • elf
    replied
    Originally posted by garyhlucas View Post
    I have my grandsons 3d printer in my office. It is a Wanhao PowerSpec installed on a drawer slide in a 2 door metal cabinet. There is a large activated charcoal filter with a fan inside to get rid of the ABS smell. The cabinet helps keep it warm which helps with the ABS.

    The printer has suddenly stopped working and I haven’t found the cause. All axis move and it properly runs the bed leveling routine. However when you start a program the bed and the extruder heat to the proper temperatures, then it fails to start printing. Nothing moves and temperatures fall right off. Tried lots of different programs, different memory cards. I took it apart and looked for loose wires, overheated connections etc. but found nothing. Any ideas?
    Take a look at the gcode as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • Stu
    replied
    Originally posted by garyhlucas View Post
    I have my grandsons 3d printer in my office. It is a Wanhao PowerSpec installed on a drawer slide in a 2 door metal cabinet. There is a large activated charcoal filter with a fan inside to get rid of the ABS smell. The cabinet helps keep it warm which helps with the ABS.

    The printer has suddenly stopped working and I haven’t found the cause. All axis move and it properly runs the bed leveling routine. However when you start a program the bed and the extruder heat to the proper temperatures, then it fails to start printing. Nothing moves and temperatures fall right off. Tried lots of different programs, different memory cards. I took it apart and looked for loose wires, overheated connections etc. but found nothing. Any ideas?
    could be a clogged nozzle, could be a bad extruder or extruder stepper or stepper driver

    Leave a comment:


  • Bented
    replied
    This is like asking "milling machine uses".

    A particular mill will make any part that it is capable of producing.

    A 3D printer will do the same, buy one that will produce the required parts.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Alciatore
    replied
    As I used the fast button on my mill's power feed I knocked my water glass on the floor. I am thinking about 3-D printing a cup holder for the mill. And perhaps a second one for the lathe.

    Many, MANY other uses.

    Leave a comment:


  • garyhlucas
    replied
    I have my grandsons 3d printer in my office. It is a Wanhao PowerSpec installed on a drawer slide in a 2 door metal cabinet. There is a large activated charcoal filter with a fan inside to get rid of the ABS smell. The cabinet helps keep it warm which helps with the ABS.

    The printer has suddenly stopped working and I haven’t found the cause. All axis move and it properly runs the bed leveling routine. However when you start a program the bed and the extruder heat to the proper temperatures, then it fails to start printing. Nothing moves and temperatures fall right off. Tried lots of different programs, different memory cards. I took it apart and looked for loose wires, overheated connections etc. but found nothing. Any ideas?

    Leave a comment:


  • Mcgyver
    replied
    Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
    mcguyver that dynamic balancer is awesome! Does it have accelerometers attached somewhere to measure vibration? I've only ever done static balancing and thought dynamic balancing was too far out of my wheelhouse to get into researching it...
    thanks, yes accelerometers. bottom left you can see a tab with four holes - accelerometers get mounted there, one on each pendulum (as I call the swinging part). I flash a high powered led as a triggered strobe and have been able to balance down to 1 gram cm irrc. or was that .1 gram/cm? can't remember but its pretty low. That's the rotor from a tool post grinder I was fine tuning. Still working on the project overall. 3D printing really improved by taking weight out of - less inertia. The Mark I was all metal...scraped in favour of plastic
    Last edited by Mcgyver; 06-14-2021, 04:37 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • mattthemuppet
    replied
    mcguyver that dynamic balancer is awesome! Does it have accelerometers attached somewhere to measure vibration? I've only ever done static balancing and thought dynamic balancing was too far out of my wheelhouse to get into researching it...

    Leave a comment:


  • dalee100
    replied
    Hi,

    Nylon 5C emergency collets are widely available. I would perhaps choose to use PETG as it's a bit more flexible than the only slightly cheaper but more brittle PLA. I would consider thicker inside and outside walls with maybe 20% - 30% infill max.

    Like a home machine shop, uses of a home 3D printer are only limited to your imagination and what you can conjure up. From support of metal shop projects, (someone posted videos of using 3D printed punches and dies of bend metals up to 10ga mild steel), to personal ideas. I have made everything from prototype motorcycle handlebars and 4 wheeler accessories for commercial use to phone holders to a cover for my Glencairn glass of whisk(e)y to cheap toys for keeping grade school kids highly interested in doing well at math quizzes to educational props for learning impaired children. Except for the motorcycle and 4 wheeler prototypes, all of this was done in the past year at home in my dining room. And for many, it's a cheap and safe intro into CNC machining. Mistakes mostly just cost a bit of time and a few pennies of wasted filament rather than $1000's in damaged parts and broken tooling if you screw up.

    Just like learning to run a lathe or mill, there are learning curves to go through. From 3D CAD, (very applicable and useful to any machine shop endeavor), to using the slicer to troubleshooting print issues. But like this forum, there are more than one forum to seek help from for each problem you might encounter.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mike Amick
    replied
    Even if you just go to www.thingiverse.com and look at the million items people have uploaded to print and just print those things it would be worth it. But the real fun is
    designing something in any of the CAD programs (fusion 360 for me) and have the printer make it. I tried for years to learn ANY of the CAD programs and just never
    could but finally found a couple Youtube vids of guys that really hold your hand and now I can do simple stuff and it's the most rewarding thing i have done in a long time.

    If you do decide to buy one, talk with us about your choices, although now a days I don't think you can buy a bad printer, they got it down pretty good.

    Leave a comment:

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