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  • Mcgyver
    replied
    Originally posted by loose nut View Post
    ]Most people seem to print out figurines, toys etc. as their main use but that isn't anything I would do.
    yeah, most people don't know what to print...but most don't know how to run a lathe or have one either. I it is a bit humorous that so much of the advertising is showing figurines....like its a solution looking for a problem.

    But....thats not the case with shop! We're always having to make and design stuff. Here's a small sampling of things I've done. Add in pattern making, creating lost was patterns etc and the sky is the limit. I'm this close to buying and SLA printer, high res, to get even better results (but am choking on the LCD costs, which is a consumable)

    It just opens up so many possibilities. Also no, with semi hollow fills (see first pic) you can create some amazingly light and strong items that wouldn't be possibly any other way….and do so while you sleep





    Encoder bracket



    Stackable trays for rifflers & needle files, made tons of these



    Lathe speed control – rheostat holder so as to use the lathes original dial to control a VFD




    Lots of parts for this sinker EDM



    Electronics enclosure



    Soft bearing dynamic balancer


    Last edited by Mcgyver; 06-14-2021, 03:06 PM.

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  • RMinMN
    replied
    Originally posted by Stu View Post

    I would think a 5C collet would be out of the question, you might be able to print very fine threads for the closer, but they would have no strength. and probably pulI out when tightening it.

    have an Ender3 V2 as well and while I like it a lot and it is a very good printer for the price, I had to put about $150 worth of upgrades to allow it to print consistently. If I were to buy another it would be something like a Prusa I3 mark3.
    I think the idea was an emergency 5C collet, not a collet closer. If you have a 5C setup but are missing a size you need badly and right now, the 3D printed would probably work. Just be aware that it isn't steel and it isn't for long term usage.

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  • Baz
    replied
    Change gears from Mod1 to 14DP. Plastic gear not good enough for you? I printed a 73 hole index plate so no need to use differential indexing for higher primes.
    You can print an entire G1 loco except for motor and axles.
    Have you searched this forum? Late 2019 a thread reported gears at about 32DP and backgear for a SouthBend.
    5C collet thread too fine. Invent your own and matching drawbar nut. Print square and hex ones, even pentagonal. Don't get prissey about it not being perfect for your usual machining to tenths, just use when appropriate.
    Sure it is a big investment for a two dollar knob but did you really need that two ton milling machine for making a half inch square hole in that plastic box rather than file it?

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  • Boats69
    replied

    Final product ….

    Click image for larger version

Name:	366B438F-D792-47C6-BFBD-5E3D6D376ACB.jpeg
Views:	265
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ID:	1946958

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  • Boats69
    replied
    3D printer, lathe and milling machine … wherever you imagination takes you …. 😎

    Designed in DesignSpark and printed on Creality CR10 in carbon filled nylon and delrin. Some machined components as well. That component at right top is a cover that encloses the mechanism. Gears designed from scratch, right from the involute curves.


    Click image for larger version

Name:	36097C03-DF9D-4ACB-82FB-DCBE62C8D7BD.jpeg
Views:	267
Size:	1.71 MB
ID:	1946955

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  • Stu
    replied
    Originally posted by loose nut View Post


    No maker spaces around here.

    Our library system has a few 3d printers but you are limited to 2 hr of print time so not much use other then familiarization.

    Some good ideas that I didn't think of so a couple of question

    1. can "soft" jaws be printed at 100% and then machined to a specific diam.to hold work.

    2. would an "emergency" collet (5C) that can be installed and then bored to size be feasible?

    My son bought an Ender 3 V2 an likes it, that's what I'm looking at too, so I do have support if I buy one.
    I would think a 5C collet would be out of the question, you might be able to print very fine threads for the closer, but they would have no strength. and probably pulI out when tightening it.

    have an Ender3 V2 as well and while I like it a lot and it is a very good printer for the price, I had to put about $150 worth of upgrades to allow it to print consistently. If I were to buy another it would be something like a Prusa I3 mark3.
    Last edited by Stu; 06-14-2021, 12:13 PM.

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  • RMinMN
    replied
    Originally posted by loose nut View Post


    No maker spaces around here.

    Our library system has a few 3d printers but you are limited to 2 hr of print time so not much use other then familiarization.

    Some good ideas that I didn't think of so a couple of question

    1. can "soft" jaws be printed at 100% and then machined to a specific diam.to hold work.

    2. would an "emergency" collet (5C) that can be installed and then bored to size be feasible?

    My son bought an Ender 3 V2 an likes it, that's what I'm looking at too, so I do have support if I buy one.
    Sure you could but it might be faster to make several of the sizes you need and print to size with 10 to 20% infill. Printing them solid will take a long time.

    Some slicer software will allow you to specify the wall thickness of the print. If you can print with thicker walls than normal it probably would work. No guarantee how well it would hold though.

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  • loose nut
    replied
    Originally posted by SteveF View Post
    Loose nut - you might want to call around first. Two of our County libraries have nice 3D printers and will print things out for the cost of the materials. I've had a couple things done as I wouldn't use it anywhere near enough to justify buying one. Check community colleges also.

    Steve

    No maker spaces around here.

    Our library system has a few 3d printers but you are limited to 2 hr of print time so not much use other then familiarization.

    Some good ideas that I didn't think of so a couple of question

    1. can "soft" jaws be printed at 100% and then machined to a specific diam.to hold work.

    2. would an "emergency" collet (5C) that can be installed and then bored to size be feasible?

    My son bought an Ender 3 V2 an likes it, that's what I'm looking at too, so I do have support if I buy one.

    Leave a comment:


  • RMinMN
    replied
    Originally posted by SteveF View Post
    Loose nut - you might want to call around first. Two of our County libraries have nice 3D printers and will print things out for the cost of the materials. I've had a couple things done as I wouldn't use it anywhere near enough to justify buying one. Check community colleges also.

    Steve
    Good point. Check for a Makerspace in your area, they may have a printer that they can print the part for you or let you use it to print your own. This can be especially nice if they have a really big printer for those really big prints you want. You may have to pay a membership fee but that can also get access to other tools that "would be nice to have but too expensive to buy for the little use I would have for it." The one I visited in another town had a fair size Shapeoko and a laser cutter as part of their tools.

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  • SteveF
    replied
    Loose nut - you might want to call around first. Two of our County libraries have nice 3D printers and will print things out for the cost of the materials. I've had a couple things done as I wouldn't use it anywhere near enough to justify buying one. Check community colleges also.

    Steve

    Leave a comment:


  • epicfail48
    replied
    Define "valid shop use", cause that means wildly different things to different shops

    Ive had some form of 3d printer in my shop for a few years now, started out with a Monoprice Select Mini, currently have an Ender 5 and an Elegoo Mars. I use them for a little bit of everything, the Mars gets used for printed master models of toys and such that i cast silicone molds out of, as well as pretty much anything that i cant make with subtractive machining that i want to look really nice. Does a fantastic job of it, though there was a hell of a learning curve. The Ender i use to make more functional parts, things like corner brackets for aluminium extrusions, a Z axis for my cheapie CNC router, the occasional angle block for when i need to set something up close enough. My printers are actually idle 90% of the time, but they justify their existence in my shop by giving me the capability to make parts that i otherwise wouldnt, be it for complexity or just material cost. Wasting $0.30 worth of plastic hurts a lot less than $20 worth of metal making a prototype that ends up not working

    If youre curious about 3d printing, the price on printers has come down so much that it doesnt take much of an investment to give it a shot. You can get a decent printer like an Ender 3 and a roll of filament for about $200. Not cheap, i know, but also not "break into the kids college fund" expensive either. Give it a shot, if nothing else the resale value of printers is halfway decent if you decide you just dont like it

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  • psomero
    replied
    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20210213_131336.jpg
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Size:	2.27 MB
ID:	1946894 Do dumb cad of an idea, have part to fiddle with in hands in the morning. Rinse, repeat. It is very empowering to do tangible mockups daily for maybe a buck or two id you were to actually account for material and electricity.

    I have made a multitude of parts which I was planning on machining, but not white sure about fit or assembly yet. It's easy enough to print a 40-60% stab at it, rinse and repeat.

    I also do some functional stuff. Recent example was AXA holder mounts. ;

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  • hollo
    replied
    Originally posted by RMinMN View Post

    Two related thoughts about making the change gears. 1. Unless you are planning to make deep cuts on low thread pitches the plastic gear will probably do just fine. The possible failure would be the keyway to lock two gears together for compound gears. Make a metal bushing for the part with the keyway and that probably goes away. 2. How much would it cost you to make a gear to try out? PLA is fairly strong and quite cheap. Why not give it a try.
    Both good points. Hadn't thought of using a metal bushing. I might even make a really big one with a smallish rim of 3d printed teeth that would be quick to change when they wear out. The cost in money is pretty minimal, but it will take some time, so on the list of planned projects to look forwards to for now...

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  • RMinMN
    replied
    Originally posted by hollo View Post
    I've had a 3d printer for about a year. I've used it a bit for some woodworking jigs where precision isn't so much of an issue. 3d printed gears work ok for low torque. I've been toying with the idea of printing some metric thread cutting gears for my machine (which has imperial ones fitted and metric are hard to come by), but don't know if they'd be strong enough. If I get back to some green sand casting I'll be quite tempted to 3d print some patterns - should make it relatively easy to get draft and parting line correct - but will wait to play with molten aluminium until I don't have a 3 year old running around!
    Two related thoughts about making the change gears. 1. Unless you are planning to make deep cuts on low thread pitches the plastic gear will probably do just fine. The possible failure would be the keyway to lock two gears together for compound gears. Make a metal bushing for the part with the keyway and that probably goes away. 2. How much would it cost you to make a gear to try out? PLA is fairly strong and quite cheap. Why not give it a try.

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  • mochinist
    replied
    Things we use ours for. Low use fixturing and softjaws, prototype or mockup type builds of potential projects and of course lots of toys, gadgets and figurines. If you cant 3d model and arent willing to put in the time to figure out how then they are only good for printing things that other people have designed and uploaded to the net for free or a price. Hobby priced 3d printers can also be finicky creatures, you will have plenty of failed prints for no apparent reason, but when you get them dialed in and they work right, they can be a lot of fun.

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