Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

[OT] Radial arm saw vs table saw

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Buying a table saw, to make a 2/4 from a 2/6 that you have is, "Penny wise and Pound foolish."

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
      What's that??? Is that one of those things that gets in the way of everything you do ???

      JL...........
      Yep, that's it. ...and then one day, while trying to simultaneously juggle the work piece, the blade guard, the splitter, and the pawls, you cut your thumb off.

      Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by lynnl View Post

        Yep, that's it. ...and then one day, while trying to simultaneously juggle the work piece, the blade guard, the splitter, and the pawls, you cut your thumb off.
        Tell me what you are cutting on a table saw that would make that necessary?
        Ripping....nope.
        Crosscut or repetitive cut...nope.

        Cutting a Dado or Rabbit:no splitter or kickback pawls, but why no guard?

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post

          Tell me what you are cutting on a table saw that would make that necessary?
          Ripping....nope.
          Crosscut or repetitive cut...nope.

          Cutting a Dado or Rabbit:no splitter or kickback pawls, but why no guard?
          I'm sure the blade guards and anti kick back devises were designed by lawyers !!

          I once watched a guy that had a new Delta table saw. It took him almost 10 minutes to set the saw up to make a simple cross cut in a piece of 1 x 6 pine. I watched him adjust the height of the blade guard a couple times and do the same with the anti kick back thing. Then he plugs the saw in and makes the cut. I didn't say a word.
          I just couldn't imagine doing that with every thing I had to cut.

          JL............

          Comment


          • #20
            You don't really need a guard. If you DO require a guard, then using a table saw (or any other piece of power equipment that can easily take your hand off) is probably not recommended. Your best guard is your brain - think of the necessary steps to complete your task and execute them in a safe manner.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Moxiedad2001 View Post
              I've seen/heard discussions on this topic for years, on and off line, and I've never heard a table saw owner say he regretted not getting a radial arm saw. But I've heard the opposite often enough. Definitely a table saw for ripping, and for ALMOST all other operations. I've used both extensively, and I own only a table saw.
              growing up I only had access to a radial arm saw. Used it for everything. Then grade 9 or 10 woodworking came along with an awesome array of pro equipment and there was both! Man what a treat. The RAS is great for some things but I agree, after grade 9 wood shop, the table saw would be the first ww machine to buy and I'd have to have most else before a RAS made the list.

              Originally posted by SLK001 View Post
              You don't really need a guard. .
              I'd want a anti kick back device though. Forrest's tale a few years ago of some HS classmate losing his testicle majorly creeped me out
              Last edited by Mcgyver; 06-15-2021, 09:57 AM.
              in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post

                growing up I only had access to a radial arm saw. Used it for everything. Then grade 9 or 10 woodworking came along with an awesome array of pro equipment and there was both! Man what a treat. The RAS is great for some things but I agree, after grade 9 wood shop, the table saw would be the first ww machine to buy and I'd have to have most else before a RAS made the list.



                I'd want a anti kick back device though. Forrest's tale a few years ago of some HS classmate losing his testicle majorly creeped me out
                Well, he must have been pretty tall or that was a pretty low profile table saw !

                JL..................

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
                  Well, he must have been pretty tall or that was a pretty low profile table saw !

                  JL..................
                  I wasn't there, fortunately, but what do you think the average height of a table saw is? the average altitude of, well, one of the boys?
                  in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    I started with just a RAS, and didn't get a table saw until later. I now rerely use the RAS, and only for sort of specialty cuts involving certain. angles. I'd characterize the RAS as being a liittle more versatile, but generally more hassle, and less safe.

                    Ed
                    For just a little more, you can do it yourself!

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
                      Special blades ???
                      Well, not special blades, but blades designed for radial arm saws. IIRC, they have close to zero rake on the teeth (or even negative rake), which prevents the saw from wanting to climb into a cut.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        A decent table saw and a sliding compound miter saw. Personally I'd pass on the one pictured though. Looks like it's pretty rough. As for a dado blade, it's perfectly fine on most table saws. The limitation will be the width of cut desired and the length of the arbor to accommodate the blade. Smaller saws are often not made to fit a wider dado blade as the saw lacks the power to run it.

                        Radial arm saws were once more popular but are uncommon now for a reason. They occupy the same or more real estate and are less capable. They can be accurate if in good condition and are well set up, but have a lot of potential for problems. Used improperly they can be dangerous, but that applies to any type of saw.

                        But if all you want to do is rip a few framing boards, you could just use a circular saw with an edge guide.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post

                          I wasn't there, fortunately, but what do you think the average height of a table saw is? the average altitude of, well, one of the boys?
                          I'm not sure weather the height is standard for all makes and models by my table saw height is 38". On me that's about 3" above my belt. It's a comfortable height for me being 5' 10". It wasn't meant to be a smart remark.

                          JL.............

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by SLK001 View Post

                            Well, not special blades, but blades designed for radial arm saws. IIRC, they have close to zero rake on the teeth (or even negative rake), which prevents the saw from wanting to climb into a cut.
                            I don't know about the rake, I haven't seen any blades that were marked specifically for RAS. I have seen blades with the blank tooth behind each cutting tooth to prevent the blade from biting in too deep which I guess would apply to climb cutting typical of RAS use.

                            JL.................

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Thirty five years ago the sliding miter saw was not very common. So I have a RAS which has done a lot of work for me. I can see why people don't want them now, but they still work well if you have it set up right and maintained. I always felt the RAS took up a little less space when placed against a wall. The table saw seems happiest right in the middle of an open space.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post

                                A well designed guard, kickback pawls and splitter get in the way, how?
                                For doing small joinery cuts? Almost all the time. For precision cross cutting or other cuts using a table sled? ALL the time. For breaking down plywood or ripping stock? A nice feature for sure.

                                A splitter is the one component in the whole rig that can stay in place for every cut and serves well. The pawls and cover could only be used for how I use my saw about 1/3 to half the time.

                                Paul, table saw for sure. Radial arm saws are not great for ripping and in fact are nasty things. Plus they require long fixed side wing table or they are even more dangerous. A table saw isn't great for basic cross cuts but you've got your cutoff saw for that. Or get a sliding compound saw so you can do wider boards.

                                I would suggest you keep shopping for a table saw. Those saws with the grooves are supposed to let the wood slide more easily. But in reality they get little pieces caught in them and grab at things. Especially the grooves with dead ends. Get a saw with a smooth top. You'll be happier.

                                Another feature that I don't like about the Nu-Way is the lack of an obvious and easily switched blade insert plate. A big feature for finer work and doing dados that don't swallow pieces is zero clearance insert plates made from suitable plywood that you make and fit to suit the blades. Get one that has an insert more similar to the DeWalt.

                                If this is just for construction then a smaller and lighter saw like this a contractor's saw will do just fine. But if you will also use it for finer joinery and being able to put it away isn't a big priority then a nice cabinet maker's saw is worth considering.

                                On the other hand you can boost the capability and handling convenience of a contractor's saw by incorporating it into a Ron Paulk style saw table. Mounting the saw as shown in the video gives you runoff support for longer pieces. Note that it would NOT need to be as big as shown. But to handle 4x8 panels and 10 foot long boards for ripping I'd suggest that it be 5ft long by 3ft wide at a minimum. And really for lifting panels up onto the table and maneuver them around I'd go for two of his design bench tops that clamp together and incorporate the contractors saw as per this sketch.

                                Click image for larger version

Name:	Contractor saw work station.JPG
Views:	194
Size:	54.9 KB
ID:	1947165

                                The two top parts with suitable supports done in Ron's way would assemble fast and easy and serve as a work bench for the project's parts as well as the saw table. And with this sort of size you can flip a sheet up onto the table pretty easily. Add a slightly short saw horse to the kit and you can stage sheet goods or longer boards before turning on the power.

                                The issue with even a big cabinet shop saw with side wings is that without an outfeed support you need helpers to hold the wood as it extends. And good intentions they might have but they always shift the work this way or that and you get rough edges. The outfeed and side support table setup fixes all that and you can be a one man wood cutting machine.



                                Chilliwack BC, Canada

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X