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  • J Tiers
    replied
    4 x 8 sheet.... Do not know of any pickup (aside from the "family cab" style "yuppie vehicles" which are not really pickups) that cannot handle a 4 x 8. Both the S10 and the Ranger will take them. With a 6 foot bed, which is the minimum credible bed, it sticks out over the closed tailgate, but whatever. An "8 foot" bed probably will take it inside, although some are apparently 7'11" and won't.

    I've carried 10 foot lumber in the 6' bed, and only a little was sticking out, maybe 20" when put in cornerwise. Not enough outside the overall outline of the truck to require a flag. Of course I could put 10 foot lumber directly into the Volvo wagon, and close the back......

    "pickups get crap mileage". The Ranger got 28+ mpg on a 250 mile trip recently, and 27.3 MPG over 1200 miles that ended yesterday. Cumulative average so far over 27,800 miles is 25.2 mpg, city, highway, winter, summer. 25 mpg is the EPA rating, which it beats on the highway. That cumulative average is a number that the S10, with half the power, never saw even for one trip. The S10 was rated 29 mpg, , and never got close, but the Ranger, rated 25 mpg, and with twice the power, almost gets the S10 rated mileage.

    Small capacity.. Ranger will carry 1860 lb total weight. That's passengers , driver, plus load, but still is almost 500 lb more than the S10. I'd call it a "heavy half ton" pickup.

    High bed... Well, yes. The tires are larger, which is part of it, and the springs need more travel because of the large load capacity. Load capacity also affects tire size. Basically comes with the territory.

    BTW, for those of you not in the USA, the Ranger is built and sold overseas with diesel, and manual shift. I'd have bought one if it was available here.

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  • Michael Edwards
    replied
    Originally posted by The Artful Bodger View Post

    How so?

    https://www.motortrend.com/news/2022...cs-comparison/



    ........ and so by the same logic my little ute can carry flagpoles (so long as I don't mind a bit sticking out the back!
    You just said in post #64 ... Several of my friends have 'utes' similar to mine or Nissan, Ranger etc, these vehicles are used for such arduous duty as hauling kids' bikes and bags of groceries, we can even handle an 8x4 sheet of wallboard which I understand is beyond the capacity of many 'pickups'.

    So unless all of those utes have an 8' bed and can haul a full sheet with the tailgate up you are FOS because they have a short bed just like the Maverick and that wallboard will be sticking out the back just like the Maverick.

    All of that 'real truck' talk in your post makes it sound like someone in a full size pickup ran over your dog and you are still bitter about it. Get a truck that suits your needs and quit whining about a truck you don't have or want.




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  • The Artful Bodger
    replied
    Originally posted by Michael Edwards View Post

    Even the new Ford Maverick which will be the smallest truck sold in America will handle 4x8' sheets of whatever, so not sure what kind of wimpy trucks you have over there.
    How so?

    https://www.motortrend.com/news/2022...cs-comparison/

    . The Ford Maverick is 199.7 inches long and has a 121.1-inch wheelbase; its estimated curb weight is between 3,550 to 3,750 pounds. The Maverick's versatile FlexBed is 4.5 feet long, although it expands to 6.0 feet with the tailgate down.
    ........ and so by the same logic my little ute can carry flagpoles (so long as I don't mind a bit sticking out the back!

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  • alanganes
    replied
    Around here anyhow, the problem with keeping an old vehicle on the road is that eventually everything succumbs to rust. The heavy use of road salt and somewhat silly strict inspection requirements here in the People's Republik eventually make keeping a 15 or 20 year old vehicle on the road challenging and a hassle.

    I find the tendency towards pickups with beds that are at chest height pretty silly myself. I have almost always had one of my vehicles be a truck or utility van, even if it was not something I drove every day.

    My 1998 Ford Ranger that I bought used 6 years ago finally had to be retired due to severe rust making it unsafe to tow even my small trailers with, and the fact that pieces were literally beginning to fall off of it. I replaced it a few months back with a 2017 Nissan Frontier that has a bit of modern gadgetry but that I really have come to like a lot. It gets decent if not exceptional mileage, has enough towing and carrying capacity for what I do and while it still rides a bit "like a truck" is comfortable enough to drive to work every day.

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  • Michael Edwards
    replied
    Originally posted by The Artful Bodger View Post
    we can even handle an 8x4 sheet of wallboard which I understand is beyond the capacity of many 'pickups'.

    .
    Even the new Ford Maverick which will be the smallest truck sold in America will handle 4x8' sheets of whatever, so not sure what kind of wimpy trucks you have over there.




    Leave a comment:


  • The Artful Bodger
    replied
    We have a slightly different attitude towards 'trucks'. Several of my friends have 'utes' similar to mine or Nissan, Ranger etc, these vehicles are used for such arduous duty as hauling kids' bikes and bags of groceries, we can even handle an 8x4 sheet of wallboard which I understand is beyond the capacity of many 'pickups'.

    We have immediate access to a 'real truck', albeit a small one, and that is a 1947 era Bedford OLB. Old but a faithful vehicle and has the advantage that it can be loaded with a forklift. If we want to buy a pallet of bricks the dealer will deliver and we can unload with our forklift from his 'real truck'.

    Those of us who have an 'RV' they are all self propelled vehicles except one with a 25' 'caravan' which is easily handled by a ute or a six cylinder car.

    When we need to move aircraft parts we get the job done by a 'real truck'. Most such loads are too heavy for any vehicle that can't be forklift loaded and/or they are too bulky.

    If we want to pull something we use a tractor and even the smallest we have (there are several tractors in our group) have more drawbar effort than any glistening 'pick-up'.

    If we need a shipping container moved we call for the man with the side lifter.

    None of us own boats that are small enough for road transport.

    Two of my friends are plumbers and they do not have any trucks of any kind as their preference is for the enclosure and cubic capacity of a ubiquitous white van.

    I am sure at least some of my friends could easily afford any 'pickup' on the market but apparently they do not see the need.

    Whatever, I must say that a big pickup fully tricked out and shined up does to some eyes look nice!

    P.S. I do not recall any machinery or vehicle repair 'pickups' around here as most seem to prefer a (small) 'real truck' with custom made tool storage and workspace module on the back.
    Last edited by The Artful Bodger; 06-22-2021, 04:39 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Originally posted by barracudajoe View Post
    My BIL is a perfect example. He doesn't own an RV or a boat, doesn't haul anything, doesn't really have a need for a pickup of any size but sold his little BMW M2 Competition and bought the fanciest 3/4 ton Ram Diesel truck he could find just so he could say "I've got a diesel pickup too" This has pushed the price of trucks and diesel higher and higher.
    Yup and guys like me that actually *do* stuff with those trucks, get screwed because we can't take on a 2nd mortgage. One of the guys (our lead mechanic) has a Ford diesel, puts over 100 miles a day with 2500 lbs of tools in the back every day. I'm lucky I get to stay at the local shop and not do the road work -- but that could change any time. We service Kenworth, Cummins, Liebherr, and Komatsu equipment and 100% of what we do is off-road. I don't really feel the need for 4x4, a decent limited-slip and some weight in the back takes care of that. Plus, I grew up playing in the snow. (Buffalo). So I *could* do OK with a 1500 truck with a small diesel and 2WD,,, but there's just no way in hell to make the payments without a 30-yr fixed rate. Heh, you should tell your BIL this.

    Leave a comment:


  • barracudajoe
    replied
    Small trucks like Toyota's, Nissan's, Rangers and the rest certainly have their place. In fact our other truck is a 4runner, but hauling or towing heavy roads over mountain passes is really beyond the capabilities of trucks in that class. I owned a Toyota PU for 12 yrs back when they used the 20R engine. Pretty reliable truck but gutless. The drivetrain was solid and held up to the SB Chevy (283 CI) I dropped in and was still running when I sold it at around 170,000 miles but it wasn't really safe trying to tow our 23 ft RV that we had at the time. Big loads call for big truck but big, fancy, diesel pickups have become a status symbol. My BIL is a perfect example. He doesn't own an RV or a boat, doesn't haul anything, doesn't really have a need for a pickup of any size but sold his little BMW M2 Competition and bought the fanciest 3/4 ton Ram Diesel truck he could find just so he could say "I've got a diesel pickup too" This has pushed the price of trucks and diesel higher and higher.

    Leave a comment:


  • Doozer
    replied
    Originally posted by MrWhoopee View Post

    Drop a golf ball in the tank, you won't need to fix the gauge.
    Funny ! ! ! Love it. Practical really. Ha !

    --D

    Leave a comment:


  • MrWhoopee
    replied
    Originally posted by George Bulliss View Post

    My gas gauge quit working about 20 years ago and is on the long list of repairs needed. I don't drive it much, so listening for the sound of the sloshing in the tank to estimate works, though my ears are getting to the point where that's not as reliable. Probably easier to fix the gauge than my ears at this point.
    Drop a golf ball in the tank, you won't need to fix the gauge.

    Leave a comment:


  • MrWhoopee
    replied
    I have two, one for fun and one for work.

    Click image for larger version

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    58 years old

    Click image for larger version

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    53 years old.

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  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Originally posted by Doozer View Post
    I had a F-100 with the Twin-I-Beam, and it rode great and no problems.
    But I do like the simplicity of the '64 and earlier Fords with the regular
    plain I-beam axle for simplicity. Just depends what you want.
    If I still had my Twin I Beam F-100, I would double the length of the radius
    rods for better bump steer geometry. It seems it is not exclusively my idea
    as there are aftermarket radius rods available that address this.
    And again, personal preference, If I could have any combo I wanted,
    it would be the 300 straight 6 and a ZF-6 speed manual transmission.
    That would be sweet and smooth. Probably be at least 1/2 way decent
    on a hill with a trailer having all those gears. By half way decent, I mean
    45 mph would suit me just fine. Simple is good. That's why I have two
    1953 International trucks. Points, coil, an GM alternator. and a battery.
    That's it. No emissions, no computerized seat control. Basic and reliable.

    -Doozer
    I had a 96 F150 with that combo, shoulda kept it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dave C
    replied
    I have a 2007 Chevy Silverado Z71 crew cab LTZ. It has all the bells and whistles from heated seats to remote start. On a good day it will get 15 mpg, and rides like a log wagon without a load in the the too short bed. But it looks macho. I drove an 85 ElCamino for 30 years, and it was a swell truck. Not heavy enough to haul a loaded trailer but great for the occasional trip to the yard and garden center. It had the 4.3L throttle body injected engine, and got a steady 20 mpg. I also had a 74 Blazer that did all my heavy work until its doors finally fell apart from rust. That's when I traded up to the macho pos.

    Leave a comment:


  • Doozer
    replied
    I had a F-100 with the Twin-I-Beam, and it rode great and no problems.
    But I do like the simplicity of the '64 and earlier Fords with the regular
    plain I-beam axle for simplicity. Just depends what you want.
    If I still had my Twin I Beam F-100, I would double the length of the radius
    rods for better bump steer geometry. It seems it is not exclusively my idea
    as there are aftermarket radius rods available that address this.
    And again, personal preference, If I could have any combo I wanted,
    it would be the 300 straight 6 and a ZF-6 speed manual transmission.
    That would be sweet and smooth. Probably be at least 1/2 way decent
    on a hill with a trailer having all those gears. By half way decent, I mean
    45 mph would suit me just fine. Simple is good. That's why I have two
    1953 International trucks. Points, coil, an GM alternator. and a battery.
    That's it. No emissions, no computerized seat control. Basic and reliable.

    -Doozer

    Leave a comment:


  • George Bulliss
    replied
    Originally posted by kendall View Post

    I had a 64 F350 flatbed, with the big semi style axles and wheels on it, only vehicle I ever had that I called a service to change a flat. It was an ex highway department truck and was bright orange. We called it 'big ugly'

    Not mine, but picture it in bright safety orange:

    https://classics.autotrader.com/clas...f350/101524718
    Wow, that one was listed for $14,500. I might have to treat mine with a little more respect.

    Leave a comment:

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