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Cutting small glass circles

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  • Cutting small glass circles

    I need to cut a few 2 7/16" diameter glass circles. Thickness is approximately 2mm. The circle cutter I have won't go that small and can't be modified. Does anyone have actual experience cutting glass circles that small? I've seen a couple advertised on Amazon and eBay but I'm looking for someone that has a cutter that goes that small. What are you using IF you've cut glass circles this size or smaller?

    -JW:

  • #2
    Diamond core drills

    The operation is done as a wet abrasive process.

    Or else, cut squares , wax a stack together and use a cylindrical grinder fitted with a diamond wheel to produce rounds.

    I've been involved with the production of tens of thousands of glass rounds less than 75 mm. (and many over 150 mm ;-)

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    • #3
      Thanks. I should have been clearer. I recently moved to Montana and no longer have my home shop. I'm looking for something I can do with limited tooling so to speak.

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      • #4
        OK

        A piece of copper or other "soft metal" tube. Used as a hole saw with a plasticien dam around the work area (on a drill press)

        Feed loose abrasive into an oil or water slurry at the glass surface. Go easy on the break out! Wax the work to a waste backer if you can.

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        • #5
          Would abrasive waterjet do such a job on non tempered glass?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Smokedaddy View Post
            Thanks. I should have been clearer. I recently moved to Montana and no longer have my home shop. I'm looking for something I can do with limited tooling so to speak.
            If you have no tools, you will need to purchase the items from those that do. Your call.

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            • #7
              This will do the job
              https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/202991371344
              but pricey for what it is!
              I have tools I don't know how to use!!

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              • #8
                How precise does the 2-7/16" diameter need to be?

                As stated above, a diamond core drill on a drill press will work well, but you are limited to the diameters of core drills available.

                This will get pretty close: https://www.diamond-drill-bit-and-to...rill-Bit.shtml

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                • #9
                  Need some more information: 1) how many is a few? 2) Will you need a diffferent size later on? 3) How pretty do they need to be? 4) Are you looking for a source of custom cut parts?
                  5) Do you have a Drill Press? 6) What is your timeline?

                  Pete

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by CalM View Post

                    Or else, cut squares , wax a stack together and use a cylindrical grinder fitted with a diamond wheel to produce rounds.
                    Please explain "wax a stack together"

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Bented View Post
                      Would abrasive waterjet do such a job on non tempered glass?
                      That would be the way to go but how many of us have such equipment ?

                      JL...............

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by CalM View Post
                        Diamond core drills

                        The operation is done as a wet abrasive process.

                        Or else, cut squares , wax a stack together and use a cylindrical grinder fitted with a diamond wheel to produce rounds.

                        I've been involved with the production of tens of thousands of glass rounds less than 75 mm. (and many over 150 mm ;-)
                        Yep, this is how it's done. The option of using a piece of copper pipe with abrasive works really well also. Just take your time and as Cal noted, be careful when coming through the far side. That is typically where it all goes wrong. (I have worked at a place that does optical filters, we do these by the thousands as well)

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by john hobdeclipe View Post
                          How precise does the 2-7/16" diameter need to be?

                          As stated above, a diamond core drill on a drill press will work well, but you are limited to the diameters of core drills available.

                          This will get pretty close: https://www.diamond-drill-bit-and-to...rill-Bit.shtml
                          That is going to time consuming as well as messy.
                          I had to drill some 1/8" holes in 1/4" plate glass for handles, 16 in all. It was a diamond abrasive type bit. Had to keep dripping water on a and keep it cool. Did it in my drill press, had to go real slow, as slow as the DP would go. Probably about a half hour per hole. And yes, had to be real careful at the breakout point or the opposite side would chip out. Wouldn't want to go through taht again. Sounds like that hand cutter listed on ebay would be the way to go for your circles.

                          I've made replacement glass covers for things like levels. Easy to cut square or rectangular pieces. The time consuming part was rounding the corners on a belt sander. Again, have to watch the heat.

                          JL...............

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by john hobdeclipe View Post

                            Please explain "wax a stack together"

                            This is as simple as it sounds. You pour melted wax on a square of glass and then place another on top of it.Pour wax on that one and add another, an so on. Squeeze them all together while the wax is still hot and then let the pile cool. It is typically done with the parts sitting on a hot plate. A bit messy, but quite easy and effective. This leaves a very thin layer of wax between the pieces that acts like glue to hold the stack together. Warm them up to separate. I expect there are a bunch of other specialty waxes for this but typically it's beeswax or a 50-50 mix of beeswax and rosin.
                            Last edited by alanganes; 06-20-2021, 10:07 AM.

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                            • #15
                              Four circular pieces of glass, forty or four hundred?
                              Does it have to be glass? Would acrylic or polycarbonate work?
                              Just buy them.

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