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Primitive but effective machining .

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  • #16
    Originally posted by tom_d View Post
    ...................... What got my attention is at the 5:10 mark. He's reaching to the wall to make what looks like an adjustment to an electrical hookup. Are those electrically live, bare metal strips running along the wall, anchored and separated by wood blocks?
    Low voltage plating setup. Not likely to be as scary as you think..... maybe not REALLY low, but plating takes a lowish voltage and may not work well at a much higher voltage. (But, what MAKES the low voltage?? Scary transformer?)
    2730

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

    Everything not impossible is compulsory

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    • #17
      Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

      Low voltage plating setup. Not likely to be as scary as you think..... maybe not REALLY low, but plating takes a lowish voltage and may not work well at a much higher voltage. (But, what MAKES the low voltage?? Scary transformer?)
      I see your point. The battery in my truck is lowish voltage too, and I know what happens if I accidentally drop a wrench across the posts. I wonder how much current is flowing through those metal straps while all those metal rods are being moved about. At one point I see him at a switch and I can see some spark at the contacts. And those OSHA approved cauldrons look safe to be hovering over, too. Gotta give 'em credit, though. They make it happen with a minimum of capital outlay. Gentile reminder about what life is like in those third world countries.

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      • #18
        yes, foundry work wearing sandals is scary, but what really worried me is what is in those drums in the plating shop? Not even rubber gloves for that!
        'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

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        • #19
          Originally posted by tom_d View Post

          Primitive, and just plain dangerous. Those sandals are probably the only thing they know for footwear. What got my attention is at the 5:10 mark. He's reaching to the wall to make what looks like an adjustment to an electrical hookup. Are those electrically live, bare metal strips running along the wall, anchored and separated by wood blocks?
          Those copper bars are for their plating voltage and a primitive version of ladder line run horizontal. I'm sure there is some unprotected high voltage wiring around there somewhere.

          JL................

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          • #20
            Plating is DC, and fairly low voltage in most cases. Amperage won't generally be very high either unless they're doing some very large items.

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            • #21
              I personally find these videos to be very poignant. It's so easy to take luxuries like running water (and affordable PPE!) for granted. Those men are toiling in frankly unsafe conditions so that I can buy a replacement faucet on the cheap while I complain about the rising cost of gasoline or lumber or what-have-you. I think it's fair to say that everyone on this forum - by the simple fact of their ability to access the internet - has something to be very grateful for. Seeing these videos makes me wish I did a better job of recognizing all the incredible luxury and opportunity I have been granted.

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              • #22
                +1
                And by zero effort on your/my behalf.
                I didn't 'choose' to not be born in a hut, or to a massively abusive parent, or a thousand other things that are not birthrights, but are essentially just seriously lucky coincidence. Out of the 7.6 billion people on the planet, I am in the clear, and extraordinarily fortunate, minority.

                Originally posted by Fasttrack View Post
                I personally find these videos to be very poignant. It's so easy to take luxuries like running water (and affordable PPE!) for granted. Those men are toiling in frankly unsafe conditions so that I can buy a replacement faucet on the cheap...
                They also serves to remind me that agencies like OSHA exist for very good reasons. That we hardly have to fight for such rights is a blessing that deserves appreciation.
                Location: North Central Texas

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by plunger View Post

                  Sarge what is stripcloth
                  I'm pretty sure both Sarge and George mean abrasive emery cloth. I've seen this suggestion in the past. The idea is to put the abrasive side inward onto the more slippery metal.

                  Another option is to turn a close fitting outside bushing where the brass just fits. Then cut a split so it acts like a collet. More surface area means more grip. And no risk of deforming the pipe into a tri-oval with excess pressure.
                  Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                  • #24
                    ..."his eyeballs caught on fire". Made me laugh ! HA ! Love it.

                    -D
                    DZER

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by BCRider View Post

                      I'm pretty sure both Sarge and George mean abrasive emery cloth. I've seen this suggestion in the past. The idea is to put the abrasive side inward onto the more slippery metal.

                      Another option is to turn a close fitting outside bushing where the brass just fits. Then cut a split so it acts like a collet. More surface area means more grip. And no risk of deforming the pipe into a tri-oval with excess pressure.
                      Yep. Both George and bcrider are right. Its the abrasive stuff that is on a roll of cloth, usually 1" or 2' wide. Where I worked, it was called stripcloth, commonly made by Norton or 3M among others. Just got on MSC's website and checked, they call it shop rolls and cloth backed shop rolls.
                      Sarge41

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by tom_d View Post
                        \ What got my attention is at the 5:10 mark. He's reaching to the wall to make what looks like an adjustment to an electrical hookup. Are those electrically live, bare metal strips running along the wall, anchored and separated by wood blocks?
                        Plating. 3-4 volts DC max at maybe 3-5 amps. No biggie.

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                        • #27
                          The local safety fuzz visited my friend's foundry and gave him a write up wrt, among other things, 'dirt' floor and workers wearing elastic sided boots.

                          He gave them a gentle education regarding safety in a foundry.

                          (No one needs molten metal poured into a boot he cant kick off quickly, never spill molten metal on a concrete floor. etc etc.)

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by The Artful Bodger View Post
                            The local safety fuzz visited my friend's foundry and gave him a write up wrt, among other things, 'dirt' floor and workers wearing elastic sided boots.

                            He gave them a gentle education regarding safety in a foundry.

                            (No one needs molten metal poured into a boot he cant kick off quickly, never spill molten metal on a concrete floor. etc etc.)
                            I am amazed that people need to be taught this. While I have never worked in a functioning foundry, I have spent a lifetime around heavy welding, etc in abandoned foundries. Dirt or gravel especially is your friend.
                            25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
                              I am amazed that people need to be taught this.
                              I was blissfully unaware....but in my defense I don't go round with molten metal! I thought The Artful Bodger meant they'd classified the floor being dirty as being the hazard but I take it from what you've just said that the floor should be either dirt or gravel presumably so the molten metal doesn't run off if spilled. Not planning to slop slag about....but you know, for interest's sake

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Cenedd View Post
                                ...but I take it from what you've just said that the floor should be either dirt or gravel presumably so the molten metal doesn't run off if spilled. Not planning to slop slag about....but you know, for interest's sake
                                Well actually, dirt or gravel is safer because it doesn't explode when molten metal splashes on it. Concrete will explode from the steam when molten metal lands on it, and the explosion will spray bits of rock and molten metal, right into your body. Whereas, dirt or gravel just dissipates it, the molten metal solidifies and the surrounding area gives off a fog of steam.
                                I have actually experienced both things a time or two.
                                25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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