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Primitive but effective machining .

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  • BCRider
    replied
    Originally posted by plunger View Post

    Sarge what is stripcloth
    I'm pretty sure both Sarge and George mean abrasive emery cloth. I've seen this suggestion in the past. The idea is to put the abrasive side inward onto the more slippery metal.

    Another option is to turn a close fitting outside bushing where the brass just fits. Then cut a split so it acts like a collet. More surface area means more grip. And no risk of deforming the pipe into a tri-oval with excess pressure.

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  • Joel
    replied
    +1
    And by zero effort on your/my behalf.
    I didn't 'choose' to not be born in a hut, or to a massively abusive parent, or a thousand other things that are not birthrights, but are essentially just seriously lucky coincidence. Out of the 7.6 billion people on the planet, I am in the clear, and extraordinarily fortunate, minority.

    Originally posted by Fasttrack View Post
    I personally find these videos to be very poignant. It's so easy to take luxuries like running water (and affordable PPE!) for granted. Those men are toiling in frankly unsafe conditions so that I can buy a replacement faucet on the cheap...
    They also serves to remind me that agencies like OSHA exist for very good reasons. That we hardly have to fight for such rights is a blessing that deserves appreciation.

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  • Fasttrack
    replied
    I personally find these videos to be very poignant. It's so easy to take luxuries like running water (and affordable PPE!) for granted. Those men are toiling in frankly unsafe conditions so that I can buy a replacement faucet on the cheap while I complain about the rising cost of gasoline or lumber or what-have-you. I think it's fair to say that everyone on this forum - by the simple fact of their ability to access the internet - has something to be very grateful for. Seeing these videos makes me wish I did a better job of recognizing all the incredible luxury and opportunity I have been granted.

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  • eKretz
    replied
    Plating is DC, and fairly low voltage in most cases. Amperage won't generally be very high either unless they're doing some very large items.

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  • JoeLee
    replied
    Originally posted by tom_d View Post

    Primitive, and just plain dangerous. Those sandals are probably the only thing they know for footwear. What got my attention is at the 5:10 mark. He's reaching to the wall to make what looks like an adjustment to an electrical hookup. Are those electrically live, bare metal strips running along the wall, anchored and separated by wood blocks?
    Those copper bars are for their plating voltage and a primitive version of ladder line run horizontal. I'm sure there is some unprotected high voltage wiring around there somewhere.

    JL................

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  • Richard P Wilson
    replied
    yes, foundry work wearing sandals is scary, but what really worried me is what is in those drums in the plating shop? Not even rubber gloves for that!

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  • tom_d
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

    Low voltage plating setup. Not likely to be as scary as you think..... maybe not REALLY low, but plating takes a lowish voltage and may not work well at a much higher voltage. (But, what MAKES the low voltage?? Scary transformer?)
    I see your point. The battery in my truck is lowish voltage too, and I know what happens if I accidentally drop a wrench across the posts. I wonder how much current is flowing through those metal straps while all those metal rods are being moved about. At one point I see him at a switch and I can see some spark at the contacts. And those OSHA approved cauldrons look safe to be hovering over, too. Gotta give 'em credit, though. They make it happen with a minimum of capital outlay. Gentile reminder about what life is like in those third world countries.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by tom_d View Post
    ...................... What got my attention is at the 5:10 mark. He's reaching to the wall to make what looks like an adjustment to an electrical hookup. Are those electrically live, bare metal strips running along the wall, anchored and separated by wood blocks?
    Low voltage plating setup. Not likely to be as scary as you think..... maybe not REALLY low, but plating takes a lowish voltage and may not work well at a much higher voltage. (But, what MAKES the low voltage?? Scary transformer?)

    Leave a comment:


  • wmgeorge
    replied
    Originally posted by plunger View Post

    Sarge what is stripcloth
    I am sure he means sandcloth, comes in rolls, good for cleaning copper before you solder or work in the lathe.

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  • tom_d
    replied
    Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
    They certainly have a good work ethic but with out a doubt are lacking in safety protocols to say the least.
    Like the guy walking around in the foundry wearing sandals while pouring molten brass into molds. But what would you expect when the floor is your work bench ? Primitive to say the least.

    JL............
    Primitive, and just plain dangerous. Those sandals are probably the only thing they know for footwear. What got my attention is at the 5:10 mark. He's reaching to the wall to make what looks like an adjustment to an electrical hookup. Are those electrically live, bare metal strips running along the wall, anchored and separated by wood blocks?

    Leave a comment:


  • plunger
    replied
    Originally posted by sarge41 View Post

    Plunger: Have you tried wrapping the brass stock with a single wrap of strip cloth? Many three jaw chucks will be at least a little worn, (meaning a little splayed in the jaws). The strip cloth (medium or coarse) will make up for the wear and not only give a longer gripping area, but will run straighter. Try it, you will like it. I also usually drill a 1/64th oversize for pipe taps. Good luck.
    Sarge41
    Sarge what is stripcloth

    Leave a comment:


  • sarge41
    replied
    Originally posted by plunger View Post
    I am a plumber and often make adaptions to faucets etc. I am limited to my tools because Im normally broke but work around it. I watched this video and am in awe as to how primitive but effective.
    If I have to tap a 1/2 inch bsp thread in a new piece of brass I struggle . I cant hold it tight enough in my three jaw chuck.

    So what I normally do is just single point turn it. Here they are doing it in a bloody drill press. So I have to ask the question. Maybe all these years Ive been struggling with crap taps and dies.
    Can anyone here tell me if they can tap a 1/2 inch bsp thread in a one meter lathe without the brass bar slipping in there three jaw with ease or do you also have issues.The video is very interesting to me.
    I know our local faucet manufacturer use calibrated torque screwdriver sets for putting in the handles and they are very expensive. These guys just use a screwdriver.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rOmKNmdYgNg
    Plunger: Have you tried wrapping the brass stock with a single wrap of strip cloth? Many three jaw chucks will be at least a little worn, (meaning a little splayed in the jaws). The strip cloth (medium or coarse) will make up for the wear and not only give a longer gripping area, but will run straighter. Try it, you will like it. I also usually drill a 1/64th oversize for pipe taps. Good luck.
    Sarge41

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  • AD5MB
    replied
    plumbers tip, and house cleaners: get a 3 foot chunk of 1 1/2" PVC pipe. put it in a Ridgid pipe threading machine. cut a taper on the inside, sharp edged, 2 - 3" deep.

    put the sharp edge inside a crusty rusty toilet, bear down, and twist. the crust and rust just pops off. clean the underwater crust and rust in about one minute.

    it does not help much with above water line nastiness, but below the waterline, sparkling white in seconds.

    it works well enough without the taper and very well with the taper
    Last edited by AD5MB; 06-20-2021, 03:59 PM.

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  • Cenedd
    replied
    Originally posted by boslab View Post
    There’s 1/2” BSPP or parallel, that’s ok if the hole is the right size, then there’s the BSPT, that’s the one that grabs for me, it can be a pig, and it’s the most common domestic wise over here.
    Grabs a whole load less very shortly after it's stripped the threads out the aluminium you worked so hard on....trust me! Found out afterwards that there are 1:16 taper reamers you're supposed/recommended to use first to cut the taper. Can find them for the 1/2" variant but I need the 1/4" flavour that Presto no longer seem to do.
    Found that TWT brand (UK made but unfortunate name) are available and seem quite good. Pictures don't seem to match the item but quality was as pictured and correct item arrived.

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  • boslab
    replied
    There’s 1/2” BSPP or parallel, that’s ok if the hole is the right size, then there’s the BSPT, that’s the one that grabs for me, it can be a pig, and it’s the most common domestic wise over here. Good taps oddly are hard to get, presto, Goliath, Hall are ok, most are old stock, big ones aren’t cheap I used to cur up to 2”
    but I don’t seem to be doing much pipe work these days so I’m in the process of cleaning up and selling off pipe dies, they’ve multiplied over the years, I often use a blade out of the pipe die set in the toolpost of the lathe to get round the absence of taper attachment, lots of the Italian and Chinese fittings have some weird threads like a crossover between NPT with odd angles can be very weird,
    mark

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