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Primitive but effective machining .

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  • #31
    The foundries I've been in all seem to have a sand floor in the casting area.
    'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Richard P Wilson View Post
      The foundries I've been in all seem to have a sand floor in the casting area.
      That's probably the best of all -- likely it was the casting sand itself. Very large foundries (Bethlehem Steel) used to do it that way when pouring pig iron.
      25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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      • #33
        @ 1:01 inserting shell sand cores, I would like to what they use to make them.
        C

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Richard P Wilson View Post
          The foundries I've been in all seem to have a sand floor in the casting area.
          There's a good reason for that. Aluminium isn't bad but brass or iron can heat shock concrete and cause it to spall with an almost explosive power. And that tends to spatter the very hot or even still molten metal all over the place along with the pieces of concrete much like a land mine. So a few inches of old casting sand that is past it's "best by date" is a nice safety feature.

          Chilliwack BC, Canada

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          • #35
            I suppose it would be "unpopular" to mention that those guys in the video are doing about as well as many people here in the US did a hundred or so years ago. OK, probably no sandals, but all the rest of it is pretty much similar as far as protective equipment and general techniques.

            At the time I was born, the techniques were only a little better in a lot of factories. Some of you folks live in areas that suffered from the "casual" attitude of those days.
            2730

            Keep eye on ball.
            Hashim Khan

            Everything not impossible is compulsory

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            • #36
              Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
              I suppose it would be "unpopular" to mention that those guys in the video are doing about as well as many people here in the US did a hundred or so years ago. OK, probably no sandals, but all the rest of it is pretty much similar as far as protective equipment and general techniques.

              At the time I was born, the techniques were only a little better in a lot of factories. Some of you folks live in areas that suffered from the "casual" attitude of those days.
              Actually that is quite correct. I have worked in some of the old foundries that were over 100 yrs old, in the Buffalo area. You would have been shocked at the conditions, and yet many of the original machines are still there, and making money for the current owners. A large chunk of the Industrial Revolution was built here, and little signs of evidence remain everywhere.... such as the number of cancer cases, family stories from the Depression, etc.

              And of course, the gutted-out factories and ghettoes everywhere.

              As an example, the 600 HP Snow engines were made here, I've worked in the foundry where this beast was poured and machined: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dhpwbBwSIAs

              they have a VTL with an 18-foot dia chuck (!) among other tooling of equal size. Well over a hundred yrs old and still in use, dirt floor and all....
              Last edited by nickel-city-fab; 06-24-2021, 12:22 AM.
              25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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              • #37
                Truck repair, Pakistani style.

                It's all mind over matter.
                If you don't mind, it don't matter.

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                • #38
                  That place reminds me of where I worked when I was about 20 - 25. Made brass plumbing products as well. That was only about 42 years ago here in Australia. I'm 67 now. Dirt floor in foundry with machine shop right next to it and a plating shop across from the machine shop. Even the machine shop had a dirt floor if IIRC. Lathes were on timber sleepers I think. Line shafts to most of them. We did wear boots though. Not much in the way of dust or fume extraction just whatever breeze went through the building.
                  Nev.

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