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OT-Maybe_ tensioning a cable

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  • #16
    The best option is just get rid of the tree. Everything else you do will be a temporary fix.
    Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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    • #17
      Originally posted by rws View Post
      I have a maple tree that has several trunks that extend from a single base trunk. The way the tree is situated, one of the trunks lean toward our house. I want to cable all of the "trunks" together, so if a t-storm should create enough turbulence I don't want the close section splitting off toward the house.

      I want to cable the whole thing together, wrap a cable around all the trunks, so if one goes, they all go. To my fortune, the biggest/heaviest leans away from the house.

      So if I loop a cable in the order of a 3/8" around them all, how can I grab the cable al pull slack out of it before cable clamping it together? With fencing wire, I simply grab the wire with vise grips, and I have one that I welded a section of steel pipe on the nut, and use a come-along to pull tension before nailing it off. But grabbing a stranded cable with vise-grips would smash it and maybe loose some integrity.

      I could put a loop in each end and use a turnbuckle, and hope I can get enough slack out before the turnbuckle runs out of thread. Just lapping each over each other and pulling slack with a come-along seems easier. But how would I grab the cable?
      Yes, use a turnbuckle with enough adjustment to pull the slack out of the cable and tension it properly.
      And yes............ sometimes trees have to be cut down when they become a threat to safety and property damage. As much as I hate to cut trees sometimes it has to be done.

      JL............

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Arcane View Post
        The best option is just get rid of the tree. Everything else you do will be a temporary fix.
        The option isn't a knee-jerk one. Call an Arborist or Certified Tree Expert, get a professional evaluation and estimate for what they would recommend.

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        • #19
          and still........ no pictures, so everyone is guessing........
          2730

          Keep eye on ball.
          Hashim Khan

          Everything not impossible is compulsory

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          • #20
            Large trees are too often planted too close to home. Oaks and the like should be at least 75' back. Not only for falling danger but for root damage. I helped my son put a cargo strap on a birch that was rubbing on the siding. The strap was there at least ten years. Landscapers planted it 4' from the wall.

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            • #21
              You never want to wrap a tree with cable. Drill a hole thru the branches and put in heavy duty eye bolts and then tie them together with cable. I personally wouldn't use a turnbuckle, because it is a weak point in your system. Instead, I would use a come-a-long to draw the two branches together (past what I wanted), clamp the cable in place, then release the tension from the come-a-long to the cable. I've seen professional arborists do it this way and it will hold for years. Just remember that a tree is weighed in tons, not pounds. It's amazing how well they use the carbon in CO2.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by CalM View Post

                A season in the sun, and that cargo strap will be as useful as crepe paper ribbons.
                I've painted straps and tarps (Even the cheapest blue tarps) with regular house paint and had them last for years years in the sun

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by CalM View Post

                  A season in the sun, and that cargo strap will be as useful as crepe paper ribbons.
                  I'm guessing that the cargo strap was only for the initial tensioning. It would be used just to allow the cabling then removed and the cable takes over.

                  JTiers, you mentioned the tree being more at risk of it falling due to imbalance. That's true. But if the one trunk which threatens the house is removed then at least the fall risk would be away from the house.

                  The hope too is that by pruning the rest as well that it could grow back with a reasonable look to it. A few years of re-growth can hide a lot of evils....
                  Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                  • #24
                    If your maple is a silver maple, remove it. It is an accident waiting to happen. God put them on earth to fall down and improve the soil for better trees.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Doozer View Post

                      I have used 2" straps that were left 10 years out in the weather
                      and were faded and a little stiff, but strong enough to secure a
                      load that I had. Certainly not as strong as new, but you are
                      exaggerating the facts and being hyperbolic. Is this your form
                      of humor or are you trying to help ?

                      -D
                      No you have not let them out in the sun for ten years. Just doesn't work that way with "plastic". Sorry, not buying the line. Weather is not sunshine...sunshine.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Doozer View Post

                        I have used 2" straps that were left 10 years out in the weather
                        and were faded and a little stiff, but strong enough to secure a
                        load that I had. Certainly not as strong as new, but you are
                        exaggerating the facts and being hyperbolic. Is this your form
                        of humor or are you trying to help ?

                        -D
                        Plastic... Lasts from 5 to 12 years, and then has pretty much turned to glass/ceramic.... breaks at a touch. That is "thermoplastics", the types using a "plasticizer". There are other types which can last a good deal longer, they use no plasticizer in the mix.

                        But sunlight breaks down plastic, eventually. Very fast for clear types, slower for pigmented types or ones with a UV blocker. But when the UV blocker is used up, they go bad fast.

                        That "stronger than steel" nonsense has so many "asterisks" with it as to make it nearly meaningless.
                        2730

                        Keep eye on ball.
                        Hashim Khan

                        Everything not impossible is compulsory

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          I have heard that the only way to cable a tree is to through bolt the limbs. This provides the least amount of damage to the layer just below the bark, that is the tree's life line. Choke that layer with anything wrapped around it, and it will grow around it, or die off.

                          First choice is to trim way back. or completely remove the limb on the house side. If it is big, hire an arborist with a bucket crew to remove it. They can also treat the stump to delay any rot from that getting into the remaining tree.

                          S E Michigan

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                          • #28
                            The assumption n all the "never wrap" cries is that the cable is for "support"... That it will have continuous tension on it to actually support the trunk/branch, etc.

                            The OP seems have suggested that the idea is more to take the wind force, and not to have the cable more than "snug", just enough that there is not "slack", but that the cable is not intended to actually hold up a bad trunk. He's just worried about it.

                            I see nothing wrong with that using a padded and "wrapped" cable. It's done all the time as a "preventer".

                            If you HAVE TO support the branch, with continuous tension approximating its weight, then eitehr bolting, or better, just cutting the branch or tree, is likely a good idea. In those cases, the tree can't support itself, and is basically falling down, except for the cable.

                            That does not seen to be the case here, per the OP statements.

                            Of course, we have NO PICS, so we really do not have a clue what the OP wants to actually fix.
                            2730

                            Keep eye on ball.
                            Hashim Khan

                            Everything not impossible is compulsory

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              For cableing use galvanized strand like that used on guy wires. It will outlast wire rope many times over.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by CalM View Post

                                No you have not let them out in the sun for ten years. Just doesn't work that way with "plastic". Sorry, not buying the line. Weather is not sunshine...sunshine.
                                10 years seems like hyperbole. But I have a 2" ratchet strap holding down a tarp over one of my granite surface plates that needs calibration. It's been outside on my driveway with minimal shading (only the shadow of the shop as the sun sets) and it's still going strong at about 2.5 years. I pop it off and ratchet it back down every now and then when I need to move things about and it hasn't broken yet.

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