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OT-Maybe_ tensioning a cable

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  • wmgeorge
    replied
    I had a beautiful maple (not silver) along side my shop, I loved it but it had to come down as it was pushing the roof and would have taken down the building. Sometimes you have to do what is best and get it over and done. Silver maples however are Gods gift to the tree service companies, I have paid well over $15k over the past twenty five years to get them gone.

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  • rws
    replied
    I fully understand the concern of a cable biting into a tree trunk. Yes, no doubt the tree will grow around and over it. Is that a serious concern about the tree? I'm not sure it is. I have seen many many trees the old timers used as fence post, and nailed barbed wire fencing to them. Some have the old wire as much as almost half way into the diameter, and the tree is still alive and thriving.

    I made a pig pen in my woods of which had a white oak in the middle. I didn't think anything of it at the time, but during the "grow out" time of the pigs, they chewed the bark down pretty good where their shelter was. Made a big scar on the tree. That was over 10 years ago, and the tree has been growing a new bark over that area since, it's almost complete and the tree is as alive today as before.

    I can and will place some protection between the cable and tree. I have every confidence the tree will do just as well as boring a hole through the center and installing a bolt through it.

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  • boslab
    replied
    How about a wide sling or strop as we call them round the beast, then tension a stainless rope round that, just thinking out loud as I’ve never tried bracing a tree myself.
    I do remember an embedded gate hinge being hit by the saw in the timber mill I worked as a kid, big inserted tooth circular saw lost all its teeth, very spectacular, thinking about it could have been leather if you were in the wrong place at the wrong time
    mark

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  • Fasttrack
    replied
    Originally posted by CalM View Post

    Would you trust it to truss a dangerous tree?

    asking for a friend
    Depends. How good of a friend is he or she?


    In all seriousness, point taken. In the past few years, I've gotten into mountaineering and ice climbing. On popular routes, it's pretty common to find nylon webbing left behind with a rappel ring on it. Some of the nylon webbing has probably been out there for several years and looks really faded and nasty. I always cut them and thread a new bit of webbing if there's any sign of discoloration. But I'm shocked at the number of climbers who trust their lives to nylon that's been left out in the sun for several seasons. Maybe it will hold... by why in heck would you risk it???

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  • CalM
    replied
    Originally posted by Fasttrack View Post

    10 years seems like hyperbole. But I have a 2" ratchet strap holding down a tarp over one of my granite surface plates that needs calibration. It's been outside on my driveway with minimal shading (only the shadow of the shop as the sun sets) and it's still going strong at about 2.5 years. I pop it off and ratchet it back down every now and then when I need to move things about and it hasn't broken yet.
    Would you trust it to truss a dangerous tree?

    asking for a friend

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  • Fasttrack
    replied
    Originally posted by CalM View Post

    No you have not let them out in the sun for ten years. Just doesn't work that way with "plastic". Sorry, not buying the line. Weather is not sunshine...sunshine.
    10 years seems like hyperbole. But I have a 2" ratchet strap holding down a tarp over one of my granite surface plates that needs calibration. It's been outside on my driveway with minimal shading (only the shadow of the shop as the sun sets) and it's still going strong at about 2.5 years. I pop it off and ratchet it back down every now and then when I need to move things about and it hasn't broken yet.

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  • Illinoyance
    replied
    For cableing use galvanized strand like that used on guy wires. It will outlast wire rope many times over.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    The assumption n all the "never wrap" cries is that the cable is for "support"... That it will have continuous tension on it to actually support the trunk/branch, etc.

    The OP seems have suggested that the idea is more to take the wind force, and not to have the cable more than "snug", just enough that there is not "slack", but that the cable is not intended to actually hold up a bad trunk. He's just worried about it.

    I see nothing wrong with that using a padded and "wrapped" cable. It's done all the time as a "preventer".

    If you HAVE TO support the branch, with continuous tension approximating its weight, then eitehr bolting, or better, just cutting the branch or tree, is likely a good idea. In those cases, the tree can't support itself, and is basically falling down, except for the cable.

    That does not seen to be the case here, per the OP statements.

    Of course, we have NO PICS, so we really do not have a clue what the OP wants to actually fix.

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  • OaklandGB
    replied
    I have heard that the only way to cable a tree is to through bolt the limbs. This provides the least amount of damage to the layer just below the bark, that is the tree's life line. Choke that layer with anything wrapped around it, and it will grow around it, or die off.

    First choice is to trim way back. or completely remove the limb on the house side. If it is big, hire an arborist with a bucket crew to remove it. They can also treat the stump to delay any rot from that getting into the remaining tree.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by Doozer View Post

    I have used 2" straps that were left 10 years out in the weather
    and were faded and a little stiff, but strong enough to secure a
    load that I had. Certainly not as strong as new, but you are
    exaggerating the facts and being hyperbolic. Is this your form
    of humor or are you trying to help ?

    -D
    Plastic... Lasts from 5 to 12 years, and then has pretty much turned to glass/ceramic.... breaks at a touch. That is "thermoplastics", the types using a "plasticizer". There are other types which can last a good deal longer, they use no plasticizer in the mix.

    But sunlight breaks down plastic, eventually. Very fast for clear types, slower for pigmented types or ones with a UV blocker. But when the UV blocker is used up, they go bad fast.

    That "stronger than steel" nonsense has so many "asterisks" with it as to make it nearly meaningless.

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  • CalM
    replied
    Originally posted by Doozer View Post

    I have used 2" straps that were left 10 years out in the weather
    and were faded and a little stiff, but strong enough to secure a
    load that I had. Certainly not as strong as new, but you are
    exaggerating the facts and being hyperbolic. Is this your form
    of humor or are you trying to help ?

    -D
    No you have not let them out in the sun for ten years. Just doesn't work that way with "plastic". Sorry, not buying the line. Weather is not sunshine...sunshine.

    Leave a comment:


  • rickyb
    replied
    If your maple is a silver maple, remove it. It is an accident waiting to happen. God put them on earth to fall down and improve the soil for better trees.

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  • BCRider
    replied
    Originally posted by CalM View Post

    A season in the sun, and that cargo strap will be as useful as crepe paper ribbons.
    I'm guessing that the cargo strap was only for the initial tensioning. It would be used just to allow the cabling then removed and the cable takes over.

    JTiers, you mentioned the tree being more at risk of it falling due to imbalance. That's true. But if the one trunk which threatens the house is removed then at least the fall risk would be away from the house.

    The hope too is that by pruning the rest as well that it could grow back with a reasonable look to it. A few years of re-growth can hide a lot of evils....

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  • kendall
    replied
    Originally posted by CalM View Post

    A season in the sun, and that cargo strap will be as useful as crepe paper ribbons.
    I've painted straps and tarps (Even the cheapest blue tarps) with regular house paint and had them last for years years in the sun

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  • SLK001
    replied
    You never want to wrap a tree with cable. Drill a hole thru the branches and put in heavy duty eye bolts and then tie them together with cable. I personally wouldn't use a turnbuckle, because it is a weak point in your system. Instead, I would use a come-a-long to draw the two branches together (past what I wanted), clamp the cable in place, then release the tension from the come-a-long to the cable. I've seen professional arborists do it this way and it will hold for years. Just remember that a tree is weighed in tons, not pounds. It's amazing how well they use the carbon in CO2.

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