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  • Compressor Rebuild Optioins......

    My old Campbell Hausfeld compressor has been pushing oil out of the crank case breather for quite some time. It's not excessive but requires periodic cleaning up.

    I suspect that some compression is slipping by the rings. I checked the air intake this morning, and it's clean and dry, no oil pushing out there.

    Back in 2007 I put new pistons and rings in it. No over size pistons were available so I just gave the cylinders a light hone. No way to really do a compression test on it either.

    Not sure what parts are available anymore. I priced a replacement pump and it was about $700. I think I paid around $300 for it when I bought it back in 1983.

    Any ideas on what my options are. It works just fine, just pushes oil out the breather.

    JL................


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  • #2
    No suggestions on the problem, but I like your radiator set up!
    "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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    • #3
      Originally posted by mickeyf View Post
      No suggestions on the problem, but I like your radiator set up!
      That's my home brew condenser set up. Actually it was a condenser for a room air conditioner.
      A local scrap yard had dozens of them, all new, rejected or not needed for some reason from some factory.
      I've never had a drop of water get past that trap to any of my other regulators around my shop.

      JL.............

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      • #4
        Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
        That's my home brew condenser set up. Actually it was a condenser for a room air conditioner.
        A local scrap yard had dozens of them, all new, rejected or not needed for some reason from some factory.
        I've never had a drop of water get past that trap to any of my other regulators around my shop.

        JL.............
        How do you get the water out of the bottoms of the condenser coil? It seems like it would be better to have the lines in the coil run horizontally.
        OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

        THINK HARDER

        BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

        MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

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        • #5
          Maybe there is an automotive piston or small engine piston that is close enough to be an oversize for the compressor?
          Although you would probably have to make custom piston pins or bushings for that to work.
          When I rebuilt my Lincoln welder, I ended up using Ford New Holland baler pistons, they gave me an exact 060 over.

          Yes, that is a beautiful air cooling setup, I notice the drip trap underneath it... old school is best.
          25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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          • #6
            Originally posted by bborr01 View Post

            How do you get the water out of the bottoms of the condenser coil? It seems like it would be better to have the lines in the coil run horizontally.
            One of the bottom elbows has a bleeder which I have never used. It's towards the exit end of the coils but it won't drain all of the elbows. This coil has been in use for over 20 years ! any water that build up in them will just push out and end up in the water trap......... nothing gets past that trap. Every regulator around my shop has always been bone dry.


            In fact, any water trapped in the bottoms of the elbows probably helps the condensation process.

            JL..............



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            • #7
              Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
              Maybe there is an automotive piston or small engine piston that is close enough to be an oversize for the compressor?
              Although you would probably have to make custom piston pins or bushings for that to work.
              When I rebuilt my Lincoln welder, I ended up using Ford New Holland baler pistons, they gave me an exact 060 over.

              Yes, that is a beautiful air cooling setup, I notice the drip trap underneath it... old school is best.
              I checked that out the last time I rebuilt it, no luck.

              You lucked out.

              JL................

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              • #8
                Harbor freight has a couple compressor pumps for replacements that get excellent reviews and are extremely reasonable. A friend just bought the larger one a few weeks ago and is very pleased.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
                  I checked that out the last time I rebuilt it, no luck.

                  You lucked out.

                  JL................
                  Indeed, I did luck out. What is your nominal piston/bore diameter right now? I'll try searching just for the heck of it.
                  25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                  • #10
                    A local scrap yard had dozens of them
                    I love where I live for many reasons, but it's a bit of a scrap yard/used machinery desert. Never a chance of finding stuff like that. I suppose I might be lucky enough to find one dead air conditioner, but even that's a stretch, since it's so temperate here few people even use them.
                    "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

                      Indeed, I did luck out. What is your nominal piston/bore diameter right now? I'll try searching just for the heck of it.
                      I think its 2 1/2". If I can find the old pistons I tell you for sure and give you the pin size too.

                      JL.................

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
                        I think its 2 1/2". If I can find the old pistons I tell you for sure and give you the pin size too.

                        JL.................
                        That just happens to correspond *very* closely with some popular, antique Briggs engines.
                        For which I know there are still pistons and rings available.
                        25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

                          That just happens to correspond *very* closely with some popular, antique Briggs engines.
                          For which I know there are still pistons and rings available.
                          Well I was close. The pistons measure 2.991 in dia. The height is 1.895. Pin dia. or pin hole in the piston .501
                          Pin center to top of piston 1.000. Weight ????? and that's important. They are thick walled and feel heavier than a lawn mower engine piston of the same size.
                          I don't remember if the pin was held in place by snap rings or if it was a press fit into the rod. Forgot to look closely at the piston. I can't see a snap ring groove in the photo.
                          But anyway...... it would be a wild stroke of luck to find an exact match. Most replacement pistons of that size, Briggs, etc. will have skirts. The skirts can be cut and trimmed but the weight would be the big issue.

                          When I last rebuilt this pump in 2007 I also replaced the head. In case your wondering why look at the next picture. You'll be able to put 2 & 2 together !

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                          One day it started making funny noises and was leaking air out of the unloader valve.
                          One of the small screws that holds the reed in place came loose. I don't remember it pushing oil at the time but after I pulled it apart and found this and given the hours I had on it at the time I figured it would be best to replace pistons and rings.



                          JL.............

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
                            Well I was close. The pistons measure 2.991 in dia. The height is 1.895. Pin dia. or pin hole in the piston .501
                            Pin center to top of piston 1.000. Weight ????? and that's important. They are thick walled and feel heavier than a lawn mower engine piston of the same size.
                            I don't remember if the pin was held in place by snap rings or if it was a press fit into the rod. Forgot to look closely at the piston. I can't see a snap ring groove in the photo.
                            But anyway...... it would be a wild stroke of luck to find an exact match. Most replacement pistons of that size, Briggs, etc. will have skirts. The skirts can be cut and trimmed but the weight would be the big issue.

                            When I last rebuilt this pump in 2007 I also replaced the head. In case your wondering why look at the next picture. You'll be able to put 2 & 2 together !

                            One day it started making funny noises and was leaking air out of the unloader valve.
                            One of the small screws that holds the reed in place came loose. I don't remember it pushing oil at the time but after I pulled it apart and found this and given the hours I had on it at the time I figured it would be best to replace pistons and rings.


                            JL.............
                            Oh, ouch..... I know Briggs has some that are right at 3" dia with the nominal .500 pin, the only real question would be the deck height.
                            From their older 3hp engines.
                            You could get away with just honing it out yourself then, its only several thou different.
                            If I recall, their next oversize was 3-1/16, that may be too much? dunno.
                            If you felt like spending money, Wiseco (motorcycle pistons) will make whatever piston you want by modifying one of their stock designs
                            and charge you accordingly...
                            25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                            • #15
                              https://compressor-source.com/collec...mpressor-pumps


                              ​​​​​​https://www.factoryaircompressorpart...pressor-pumps/

                              ​​​​​​https://oemaircompressor.com/GrayLin...orPumpGL5.aspx

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