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  • Dan_the_Chemist
    replied
    Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
    It takes an awful lot of either age or abuse to warrant scraping a chain like that. You would think there is used market for it that pays better than scrap price.

    JL..............
    I did a search for "anchor chain inspection" and a few other similar searches and found a few things.

    Anchor chains are subject to corrosion, stress, age, and manufacturing defects. Different countries have different regulations, but some require periodic inspections that include taking the dimensions of links along the entire chain, and also 10 link sections. If any link or section is found to be more than 12% out of original spec for length, width, diameter of the link metal, etc., it is to be sent back to the manufacturer for repair or replacement. Some countries require non destructive testing including magnetic fluorescent dye testing, etc. every few years.

    One of the websites stated that offshore drilling platforms often have as many as 10 anchors, with as much as 10 km of anchor chain on some of the anchors. Those chains are hauled up every few years and replaced, and the old chain inspected on shore and either reused or scrapped. That makes sense when the chain is holding a $650 Million investment in place.

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  • Bob Engelhardt
    replied
    Originally posted by Dan Dubeau View Post
    ... Tough way to make a living. ...
    Indeed! I had a "Yikes" moment at 2:50 when a worker is looking at the camera while the worker in front of him pulls an orange-hot axle off the hammer. He swings it around and the guy behind notices just in time to move his foot back & avoid the axle hitting him on the calf. That would probably hurt!

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  • old mart
    replied
    The steel that anchor chain is made from is definitely not mild steel. Those cut sections are exactly the right weight to make the forgings with the minimum of waste. There are plenty of ships being run on to beaches in India, Pakistan and Bangladesh to provide a constant supply of chain.

    Leave a comment:


  • JoeLee
    replied
    Originally posted by Willy View Post
    I'm certainly no expert on ship chain sizes by any means, and cruise ships just like any other ship come in all manner of shapes and sizes too as I'm sure you are more than aware of.
    Saw a show a while back about the new mega size container ships and was amazed at the size of their anchor chain, each link at over 500 lbs! so the link I pictured above is not all that large in the grand scheme of things.
    However salvaged ships chain is likely more often to come from a commercial ship than from a cruise ship just because they vastly out number them.

    The links in your video though are definitely flame cut, this is clearly evident in the first 15 seconds of the video you linked to. Not only by the rough salvage yard cuts but also by the slag found on some of the pieces.
    The photo below is from that video at about the .09 second mark.

    Yes, I see that now.

    JL............

    Leave a comment:


  • Willy
    replied
    I'm certainly no expert on ship chain sizes by any means, and cruise ships just like any other ship come in all manner of shapes and sizes too as I'm sure you are more than aware of.
    Saw a show a while back about the new mega size container ships and was amazed at the size of their anchor chain, each link at over 500 lbs! so the link I pictured above is not all that large in the grand scheme of things.
    However salvaged ships chain is likely more often to come from a commercial ship than from a cruise ship just because they vastly out number them.

    The links in your video though are definitely flame cut, this is clearly evident in the first 15 seconds of the video you linked to. Not only by the rough salvage yard cuts but also by the slag found on some of the pieces.
    The photo below is from that video at about the .09 second mark.


    Leave a comment:


  • JoeLee
    replied
    Originally posted by Willy View Post

    You would thinks so wouldn't you?
    I'm not certain by any means if those nuggets being turned into truck axles are in fact cut up ship anchor chain but they sure look like they could be? Why else the elbow?
    This plus the fact that I would suspect ship anchor chain is likely a good quality steel .
    Also keep in mind that India is home to some of the largest ship break up and scrap yards. I believe they purchase and break up about 400-450 ships annually, that's a lot of material to process and sell.

    Saw a program just lately about the ship salvage industry in Turkey, you should have seen the large number of beautiful cruise ships being broken up due to that industry going down the toilette due to Covid-19. Unbelievable at first glance but the cruise ship industry has to try and cut their losses, lot's of money involved to keep one of those vessels afloat month after month without any revenue being generated. Lots of the big cruise lines scrapped some very beautiful and lavish ships with 10-15 years of life left in them yet before requiring major re-fitment or replacement.
    Well, that sure looks like links that have been quartered after seeing your picture next to the can. I'm going to guess that stuff is about 5" in dia. and each piece is about 18" long then that would weigh in at about 100Lbs. It looks like what he's slinging with those tongs isn't light.

    I don't think cruise ships use anchor chain that big, more likely those huge container ships like the one that got stuck in the canal or an aircraft carrier.

    It looks like it was clean cut too, like band saw cut.

    JL...........

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  • wierdscience
    replied
    Another forge making hammer heads-

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iw8thlyGgho

    Leave a comment:


  • Baz
    replied
    Probably another video somewhere of a forge making chain out of old back axles.
    How/where it used to be done. about 150 years ago.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dan Dubeau
    replied
    Yeah, looks like anchor chain to me too. Tough way to make a living. Sure makes one appreciate what you have watching videos like that.

    Leave a comment:


  • rickyb
    replied
    Obviously using scrap. Entire process is outdated by about 40 years. I’ve seen a lot of heavy truck axle shafts forged. Not one of them this primitive.

    Leave a comment:


  • boslab
    replied
    Looks like anchor chain to me, strong guys too btw, I’ve slung a 80mm red hot bar about a few times out of the pouring tube on the casters when they froze up, it’s bloody heavy and burns your leg, hard on the back and shoulder, I’ve seen even bigger chain in the scrap, had a bar through the links to stop it knotting
    mark

    Leave a comment:


  • Willy
    replied
    Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
    It takes an awful lot of either age or abuse to warrant scraping a chain like that. You would think there is used market for it that pays better than scrap price.

    JL..............
    You would thinks so wouldn't you?
    I'm not certain by any means if those nuggets being turned into truck axles are in fact cut up ship anchor chain but they sure look like they could be? Why else the elbow?
    This plus the fact that I would suspect ship anchor chain is likely a good quality steel .
    Also keep in mind that India is home to some of the largest ship break up and scrap yards. I believe they purchase and break up about 400-450 ships annually, that's a lot of material to process and sell.

    Saw a program just lately about the ship salvage industry in Turkey, you should have seen the large number of beautiful cruise ships being broken up due to that industry going down the toilette due to Covid-19. Unbelievable at first glance but the cruise ship industry has to try and cut their losses, lot's of money involved to keep one of those vessels afloat month after month without any revenue being generated. Lots of the big cruise lines scrapped some very beautiful and lavish ships with 10-15 years of life left in them yet before requiring major re-fitment or replacement.

    Leave a comment:


  • JoeLee
    replied
    It takes an awful lot of either age or abuse to warrant scraping a chain like that. You would think there is used market for it that pays better than scrap price.

    JL..............

    Leave a comment:


  • Willy
    replied
    Click image for larger version

Name:	STUDLESS_CHAIN_001.jpg
Views:	408
Size:	38.7 KB
ID:	1950033

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  • Willy
    replied
    Originally posted by old mart View Post
    I wonder if the steel is cut from anchor chain?
    Saw this about 6 weeks ago and this is what I thought too.
    All flame cut and so likely salvage material.
    Makes you appreciate some of the "bad" jobs we've had in the past.

    Leave a comment:

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