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T head engine by Brian

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  • Tiers- I didn’t imply you were knocking Brian.
    I was speaking only for myself.

    Sid

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    • Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
      I spent the day working on a real job, but tonight I'm having a close look at this engine. I think that other than the flywheels and gear covers, everything is finished. I'm waiting for my cams to arrive, and there is a bit of finessing to connect the cams to the large gears. I don't need the gear covers to start the engine, so this could get exciting pretty soon. I'm still on the fence regarding the flywheels, but I want to go down to my nut and bolt store and look at something. They have a bin full of casters down there, and I remember seeing some large aluminum casters with rubber bonded to the outer rim. I have some double extra strong schedule 80 pipe here, and if I could machine the rubber off those aluminum casters and put some heavy wall pipe around the aluminum, it might make some nice flywheels.
      I did something similar using some cast iron wheels to make a step pulley.





      Works well, but be aware that since they are used in a low-speed application the bore and exterior machined surfaces were not located on the casting with a lot of care, making them very unbalanced. I skimmed all the surfaces to make things concentric and you may need to do this as well to prevent your engine from hopping away. Also, the bores were sized for a bearing so they will most likely be very oversized and you may need to develop a hub to bring it down to your shaft size. But it's a nice cheap way to get a cast wheel with a bit of effort.
      Cayuga, Ontario, Canada

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      • If every rolling and rotating surface was on ball bearings, the engine would be "loose" when first assembled. Although I have ball bearings on the crankshaft, the con rod to crankshaft, con rod to piston, and piston to cylinders are all machined fits. I try to keep my tolerances fairly tight on these machined fits, which does make the engine a bit tight before it has been ran. After running 15 minutes of running, those tight friction points will disappear, and give proper running tolerances.
        Brian Rupnow
        Design engineer
        Barrie, Ontario, Canada

        Comment


        • Originally posted by sid pileski View Post
          It’s not required.
          I think it’s a mater of experience, patience and to some degree, the type of equipment a person may have.
          Im not going to Knock anyone’s work. But we all have different levels of gifts. And, in the end, most times they run. Brian has displayed this many times.
          If I were to have an engine that turned that tight, without rings, I probably would go back and fix,remake.
          But in the end, “running in” gets you there.


          Sid
          That, plus Brians engines do not see a lot of operating time so lifespan is not a issue. On a car engine, or similar, rod to crank or rod to piston fits that tight would probably result in a very early failure.

          Along the same line of thinking, I was thinking that hardening the cams, followers and similar parts probably isn't necessary for a engine that will see so little operating time.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by sid pileski View Post
            Tiers- I didn’t imply you were knocking Brian.
            I was speaking only for myself.

            Sid
            I figured, comment for others, not you. You are a class act. So is Brian.
            2730

            Keep eye on ball.
            Hashim Khan

            Everything not impossible is compulsory

            Comment


            • A HUGE Thank you going out to Sid from New York and to Laverne Karras from Keswick for the cams they CNC machined for me. Both sets arrived today in the mail, and they are simply marvelous. These cams are just about all I need to finish the t-head engine. Guys, I really do appreciate it.--I will use the cams Sid made on this current engine, and the ones Laverne made will be saved for my next engine.-Brian
              Brian Rupnow
              Design engineer
              Barrie, Ontario, Canada

              Comment


              • Yes, even I get tied up with other things and machining has to take a back seat. I have however, found the time to make my oil filler spout and drain. It's pretty simple. You take both plugs out, and add oil to the sump until it starts to run out the bottom hole. When it does, then the oil is at the correct level.
                Brian Rupnow
                Design engineer
                Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                Comment


                • Looking good. Should have a runner before long!
                  2730

                  Keep eye on ball.
                  Hashim Khan

                  Everything not impossible is compulsory

                  Comment


                  • Someone was asking how I would attach the cam to the large gear. Here it is. The # 4 socket head capscrew goes thru the cam and threads into a tapped hole in the gear. The two 1/16" drills which you can see will be replaced by 1/16" diameter drive pins, which pass thru zero clearance holes in the cam and the gear and are held in place by Loctite.
                    Brian Rupnow
                    Design engineer
                    Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                    Comment


                    • Today was a fun day, attaching the cams to the large gears and reassembling everything to see the valves going up and down. It doesn't sound like much, but I've spent the entire day doing it. I'm well pleased with todays work.---Brian
                      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FQYSKkhT4uw
                      Brian Rupnow
                      Design engineer
                      Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                      Comment


                      • Well Rats!!! This morning I drove to everywhere in Barrie that sells casters, looking for a caster with an aluminum hub and flange with a cast in place outer sleeve of rubber or nylon. Princess Auto had exactly what I need, but not in the size I wanted. If I could have found the right size of caster I would have removed the outer nylon or rubber and mounted a steel outer rim to create "instant flywheel". Since I couldn't find what I wanted, I will now resort to making my own flywheels from what stock I have on hand.
                        Brian Rupnow
                        Design engineer
                        Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                        Comment


                        • I think the summer heat may have driven me mad. I just ordered a pair of 4 1/2" cast iron flywheels from Martin Models in the USA. I checked out what material I had to make these flywheels, and I do have it, but seem to be suffering from a case of "lazy ar$e". If I hadn't picked up the recent design contract for a couple of welding fixtures, I'd have made the flywheels from what stock I have. My good wife just informed me that any money coming from the small design contract should be spent on "Toys for my hobby" and I'm not going to argue with that!!--Brian
                          Brian Rupnow
                          Design engineer
                          Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                          Comment


                          • Naw Brian, you're not the only one... I tend to prefer buying things nowadays, but most of the time I just can't so I gotta make do and mend. Having health issues interfere with your income well and truly sucks.
                            25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
                              I think the summer heat may have driven me mad. I just ordered a pair of 4 1/2" cast iron flywheels from Martin Models in the USA. I checked out what material I had to make these flywheels, and I do have it, but seem to be suffering from a case of "lazy ar$e". If I hadn't picked up the recent design contract for a couple of welding fixtures, I'd have made the flywheels from what stock I have. My good wife just informed me that any money coming from the small design contract should be spent on "Toys for my hobby" and I'm not going to argue with that!!--Brian
                              You certainly do have a good wife!
                              Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
                                Naw Brian, you're not the only one... I tend to prefer buying things nowadays, but most of the time I just can't so I gotta make do and mend. Having health issues interfere with your income well and truly sucks.
                                Loss of income always sucks. Nowadays I'm proud of how I got by when things were tough for me. You should be proud also. You are a tough survivor.
                                I cut it off twice; it's still too short
                                Oregon, USA

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