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T head engine by Brian

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  • #16
    Brian -- just for inspiration --
    Have you seen Find Hansen's models? True diesel in a 3/4" cylinder, etc...
    I don't think he uses kits either. very cool video :https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gvSAnpn_YHw

    Just in case you wanted to see something different
    25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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    • #17
      That is a lovely engine. I hadn't seen that before.---Brian
      Brian Rupnow
      Design engineer
      Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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      • #18
        Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
        Brian -- just for inspiration --
        Have you seen Find Hansen's models? True diesel in a 3/4" cylinder, etc...
        I don't think he uses kits either. very cool video :https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gvSAnpn_YHw

        Just in case you wanted to see something different
        His stuff is crazy nice. And he is the only person I have found on the tube that builds small true diesels.

        Have you seen the video where he shows his injectors, and the pattern testing system?
        2730

        Keep eye on ball.
        Hashim Khan

        Everything not impossible is compulsory

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        • #19
          Although I admire the skill and craftsmanship involved in designing and building small model engines, I would be more interested in putting them to work at higher speeds and heavy loads. That's one challenge that I think was never quite resolved for a previous design, and I was really looking forward to seeing that sawmill turn little branches into rough sawn model lumber!
          http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
          Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
          USA Maryland 21030

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          • #20
            Now we have an oil filler tube for the wet sump, a drain, and some totally awesome gear guards. Other than keeping your fingers out of the gears, these gear guards cut down a lot of the noise from the gears meshing.
            Brian Rupnow
            Design engineer
            Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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            • #21
              PSTechPaul---You are confused. The sawmill ran fine, and many were built to my design. It was the edger that never ran successfully.
              Brian Rupnow
              Design engineer
              Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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              • #22
                Thanks for the reply Brian, I kinda figured that. I have a lot to learn about engine design and building, never thought I would, but I'm starting to get bit by the bug.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

                  His stuff is crazy nice. And he is the only person I have found on the tube that builds small true diesels.

                  Have you seen the video where he shows his injectors, and the pattern testing system?
                  No, I'll have to go see it. I'm really curious about his injections setup.
                  25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by PStechPaul View Post
                    Although I admire the skill and craftsmanship involved in designing and building small model engines, I would be more interested in putting them to work at higher speeds and heavy loads. That's one challenge that I think was never quite resolved for a previous design, and I was really looking forward to seeing that sawmill turn little branches into rough sawn model lumber!

                    The confusion may result from this engine, which was put on the shelf without running properly: https://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/fo...overned-engine

                    The good news is that maybe all it needs is good rings, which Brian now knows how to make.

                    Allan Ostling

                    Phoenix, Arizona

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                    • #25
                      Aostling---that's a different engine. That link takes you to my opposed twin.
                      Brian Rupnow
                      Design engineer
                      Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                      • #26
                        Yes, that's the one I was thinking of. I don't know what tool it was connected to - I had remembered a sawmill but it was probably the edger. In any case, the cause for the malfunction was never determined. A shame, as it was a beautiful engine. But let's not derail this thread.
                        http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                        Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                        USA Maryland 21030

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                        • #27
                          So Brian, order the stock yet? LOL

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                          • #28
                            I was getting bored. Oh Oh--I'm having machining withdrawal. I haven't built anything since I made a set of rings that worked. I went and seen my favorite material guy and paid $25 for a piece of 6" x 1" x 12" long piece of aluminum. A couple of days drilling, tapping, counterboring, sawing, and milling work has yielded the main frame of my t-head engine. I have a visiting grandson from out of town, so might not machine anything more for a few days. Damn, I like a day spent in my shop!!!
                            Brian Rupnow
                            Design engineer
                            Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                            • #29
                              I hate chain drilling!!! The original plan was to bolt this part to the faceplate and bore it out to the required size. Sadly, my lathe which is supposed to swing 12" really only swings about 11 1/2" so, it has been chain drilled instead. Now to knock the piece out and smooth up the resulting mess. I hope that I can tie this part to my rotary table to clean everything up.
                              Brian Rupnow
                              Design engineer
                              Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                              • #30
                                I would have had to build some more fixturing to mount this on my rotary table. This is where my oscillating drum sander really pays for itself. The curved area is non critical, just a visual thing, and this took about five minutes on the oscillating drum sander.
                                Brian Rupnow
                                Design engineer
                                Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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