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T head engine by Brian

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  • brian Rupnow
    replied
    Toolguy--that is why I made the cams and lifters from 01 steel and hardened them. You could pound on them all day and not hurt them.

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  • Toolguy
    replied
    Going from .026 to .049 is a big jump in spring pressure. I bet the new springs will seal the valves, but may put a lot of wear on the cams. Time will tell.

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  • brian Rupnow
    replied
    I dipped into the Rupnow fortune today and bought a 10-24 Helicoil kit which comes with all the necessary drills, taps, etcetera and about 40 inserts in different lengths for $116.00. While I was picking up the kit, I picked up some very heavy, bull-doggy looking compression springs to be used as valve springs. The valve springs I have on the engine now are 0.026" diameter wire size. The new ones I bought are 0.049" wire size. They are also larger in overall diameter, so tomorrow I will machine new valve cups that go on the valves to center the springs. This business of valves sealing one day good enough for the engine to run, and then not sealing the next day is ridiculous.

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  • aostling
    replied
    Originally posted by Sparky_NY View Post
    You have done enough engines that if your gut instinct says the springs are too light then they probably are !
    Those two springs certainly do look weak -- this could be the solution.

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  • Sparky_NY
    replied
    You have done enough engines that if your gut instinct says the springs are too light then they probably are !

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  • brian Rupnow
    replied
    I'm pretty sure that the leaking is a result of the valve springs not being strong enough to firmly seat the valves. I have a "kit" with about a thousand springs in it, and I just grabbed a pair that were the right diameter. I suspect that there is enough friction between the valves and their long guides that the springs aren't doing their job. The valves were sealing well enough for the engine to run, as seen in the earlier video, and valves don't "go bad" in about a total of 15 minutes run time. The engine never got hot enough to do any valve burning. As I said, my first move here will be to try stronger valve springs. The current springs are only 0.026" diameter wire and are quite easily compressed.

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  • Sparky_NY
    replied
    Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
    There is no provision for lubricating the stems except for squirted on oil and pre assembly oiling. The leak is mostly on the intake valve, but both valve cages and valves are identical, so I imagine there is some leaking at the exhaust valve as well.
    OOOO So there is a identified valve(s) leaking ! Seems I recall this happening on other engine builds, valves that sealed initially only needing to be re-lapped after a short amount of running.

    What are the valve / seat materials again? Might be time to step back and reconsider the methods / materials in the valves/seats to determine why they are not holding up long. Too little a contact area perhaps? Just a guess.

    In larger motors its fairly common practice to make the rocker contact a bit off center of the valve stem to promote the valve to rotate a bit in operation.
    Last edited by Sparky_NY; 09-12-2021, 07:23 PM.

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  • brian Rupnow
    replied
    There is no provision for lubricating the stems except for squirted on oil and pre assembly oiling. The leak is mostly on the intake valve, but both valve cages and valves are identical, so I imagine there is some leaking at the exhaust valve as well.

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  • Sparky_NY
    replied
    Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
    Sparky--everything has been rechecked since reassembling the engine.--valve timing, ignition timing, sparkplug sealing, head gasket, and seeing a visible spark with sparkplug laying out on the head.
    Dang, that should cover it. Still, something HAS to be different than when it was running well. It will be interesting to see what eventually gets it running again.

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  • Willy
    replied
    Can you hear from which valve the leak is coming from thru either the intake or exhaust port, if it is indeed a valve leaking?

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  • chipmaker4130
    replied
    How are those valve stems lubricated?

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  • brian Rupnow
    replied
    Sparky--everything has been rechecked since reassembling the engine.--valve timing, ignition timing, sparkplug sealing, head gasket, and seeing a visible spark with sparkplug laying out on the head.

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  • Sparky_NY
    replied
    Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
    Sparky, sometimes I never know. When I first assembled the valves and guides, they worked and moved freely. When I first started the engine, I had to disassemble things, clean them up, and give a light regrind with 600 grit on the faces. Then the the engine ran quite well. Took some things off for painting, none of which had anything to do with the valves, reassembled things and it won't run, bad compression. None of my other engines have been like this, and the only difference is the length of the valve guides. If I was starting from scratch, I would grind the relief into the valve stems, not the guides. If I put stronger valve springs on it, I will see if there is enough valve to hang onto and use my toolpost grinder to knock about 0.015" off the stem diameter in the center where I show the clearance in my drawing.
    How about rechecking the valve timing? The cam(s) moved earlier in the build causing the same problem, that would be the first thing I would check, maybe they moved again.

    Head gaskets have also been a problem area in the past, maybe haul out that air fitting and pressurize and check. Sealing that leaky spark plug wouldn't hurt either.

    The valve train worked as is, the relapping the valves you did had nothing to do with the stems/guide clearance. From a engineering standpoint your proposed rework is a good idea but its already proven not necessary for a good runner. Something changed.
    Last edited by Sparky_NY; 09-12-2021, 05:00 PM.

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  • brian Rupnow
    replied
    Sparky, sometimes I never know. When I first assembled the valves and guides, they worked and moved freely. When I first started the engine, I had to disassemble things, clean them up, and give a light regrind with 600 grit on the faces. Then the the engine ran quite well. Took some things off for painting, none of which had anything to do with the valves, reassembled things and it won't run, bad compression. None of my other engines have been like this, and the only difference is the length of the valve guides. If I was starting from scratch, I would grind the relief into the valve stems, not the guides. If I put stronger valve springs on it, I will see if there is enough valve to hang onto and use my toolpost grinder to knock about 0.015" off the stem diameter in the center where I show the clearance in my drawing.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sparky_NY
    replied
    Begs the question, if the engine ran fine with good compression before, why would the friction increase so much and compression lower with only a very few minutes run time? With running, the friction between the valve and guide would lower one would expect.

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