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Cordless Drill Meltdown

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  • #16
    I saw the mention of an LFA chuck and thought maybe they would have one to replace the crap chuck on a Milwaukee Fuel drill. Nope, Milwaukee used a 7/16-18 thread chuck!

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    • #17
      Originally posted by garyhlucas View Post
      I saw the mention of an LFA chuck and thought maybe they would have one to replace the crap chuck on a Milwaukee Fuel drill. Nope, Milwaukee used a 7/16-18 thread chuck!
      I've got one of the M18 Fuel drills at work. I've long wanted to put an old-school Jacobs 14N on it. Having the lathe would make that job easy.
      25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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      • #18
        Cordless drills are amazingly robust. I've never had brushes wear out, but bushings sure do. I had a Bosch that was a good drill, well balanced and powerful, but couldn't keep the teeth on the gears. Almost every cordless I've owned was shelved because of worn out batteries. Some of the cheapest ones had the most accurate chucks.

        Interesting, to me anyway, was one Makita which still works but draws a lot of juice. Gets hot and runtime is poor. Internal friction is about on par with other cordless drills. Maybe the magnets are weak. The armature seems to check out ok.

        Every now and then I put an old cordless drill into another use. One became a tapping tool with an outboard power supply and separate easy reversing switch. Several of them have donated their chucks, most of which were Jacobs. I picked the best of the keyless to use on my drill press adapter for the lathe.
        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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        • #19
          Originally posted by garyhlucas View Post
          I saw the mention of an chuck and thought maybe they would have one to replace the crap chuck on a Milwaukee Fuel drill. Nope, Milwaukee used a 7/16-18 thread chuck!
          Are you sure about that thread? My M18 is 1/2-20. Lots of options. Put a Rohm on mine

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          • #20
            Originally posted by darryl View Post
            ...................................Almost every cordless I've owned was shelved because of worn out batteries. .................
            If the drill uses NiCd batteries, then you can rebuild them, or have it done. I get mine done at the local "Batteries and Bulbs" store. They get sub-C batteries cheaper than I can, so I let them do it.

            They will not touch any Lithium battery pack, though.
            CNC machines only go through the motions

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            • #21
              I've been trying to get the chuck off a makita cordless hammer drill for a couple days now. Remove the left-handed retaining screw, got an allen wrench in the chuck jaws, put the drill in low gear and whacked it with a hammer. Chuck and spindle still turn together. Going to try a torch next - that sucker is on there pretty good.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by thin-woodsman View Post
                I've been trying to get the chuck off a makita cordless hammer drill for a couple days now. Remove the left-handed retaining screw, got an allen wrench in the chuck jaws, put the drill in low gear and whacked it with a hammer. Chuck and spindle still turn together. Going to try a torch next - that sucker is on there pretty good.
                When I changed mine it took some heat from a heat gun to get it moving. They had some flavor of thread locker on the threads.

                I did have a Bosch drill once that had a lock screw in it like a threaded mount, but the spindle was actually just splined instead. Luckily it slipped off about the time I was fixing to gently knock the h*ll out of it.
                I just need one more tool,just one!

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                • #23
                  You have to be careful. 45 years ago I had one power tool. It was a Craftsman VSR that was built like a tank. I bought an accessory that required removing the chuck. I tried everything under the sun, up to and including a 2 foot cheater bar in the chuck and a hardened pin in the spindle lock hole. No luck.

                  Then I found the left handed lock screw deep down inside the chuck. By then I'd bent the spindle and messed up the chuck jaws. I used that beat up drill for years simply because I could not afford a lot of tools back then. I finally threw it away around 10 years back when I realized that I had 6 or 7 drills in the cabinet.

                  Dan
                  At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

                  Location: SF East Bay.

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                  • #24
                    Heat gun did the trick! About five minutes at the high/1000F setting, applied to the chuck jaws+allen wrench. Put it in low ("1"), changed to screwdriver mode at highest torque rating, popped the thing in forward and it took two good smacks with the rubber mallet to break loose.

                    I saw no evidence of thread locker, but there is a plastic disk on the inside end of the chuck labelled "R-Lock" with lock/unlock icons that are helpfully hidden by the shroud that houses the hammer-drill-screw and torque selectors. That might be some proprietary locking system ... or it could just be a flimsy disk that holds the chuck together.

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