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  • #16
    If you possibly can, find a smooth-bore hose for your shop vac. I picked mine up off eBay, as I recall- not as cheap as the corrugated stuff, more like trash pump inlet hose. But it was worth every penny.

    If the stuff can get past the nozzle- the smallest point- it basically never jams mid-hose. That's one of the most helpful shop-vac tricks out there. I'd wager it helps suction too, as the smoother bore reduces air friction and turbulence as well.

    Doc.
    Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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    • #17
      Couldn't get out of work before HD closed last night, but will stop first on my way into work in a bit.

      I usually shovel up most of the big chips anyway as it's faster IMO, and just vac what's left in the nooks and crannys.

      I'll report my review of it tomorrow.



      Doc, I'll keep an eye out for the hose. It would probably cost more for that hose than the whole vac lol.

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      • #18
        I just use chip trays on everything and brush the chips into a bag in a bucket for recycling. Only takes a couple of minutes to clean up, though I'm sure I don't work to the scale some of you guys do.

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        • #19
          I have chip trays also, but the chips don't seem to realize that they have to fall neatly into the trays.
          2730

          Keep eye on ball.
          Hashim Khan

          Everything not impossible is compulsory

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          • #20
            Yup chip trays only seem to catch about 60% of the chips from the lathe. the rest end up in about a six foot radius around the machine scattered randomly, except for the ones that make it down my shirt or in my pockets.

            Milling machines, well they don't even bother to equip those with a chip tray since most chips will likely land in close proximity to a time zone either side of your location. I usually use temporary guarding (cardboard) around the work zone to at least try and keep most of them in the shop.
            Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
            Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

            Location: British Columbia

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Willy View Post
              ...................................., except for the ones that make it down my shirt or in my pockets.
              ..........................)
              LOL..... Ain't THAT the truth. I found an old lab coat or two, those seem to do a decent job of keeping chips out of my shirt and pants pockets.

              The ones that get into shoes.... that's a different issue.
              2730

              Keep eye on ball.
              Hashim Khan

              Everything not impossible is compulsory

              Comment


              • #22
                mine know where to go, perhaps I have a better quality of chip? The shields on my mill direct almost all of the chips down into the trays. On the lathe, some of them come off the front and are swept up, but most of them are caught by the backsplash and chip trays.

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                • #23
                  Finally got a chance to give it a shot after picking it up last Saturday and it SUCKS. Seriously. It actually works pretty good, and should fits my needs perfectly. I haven't tried it with any wet chips from the mill yet (hopefully get some time this weekend to run some parts and give it a test), but it did great with cleaning up the lathe bed, and other areas of the shop. I like the portability, and short hose. It didn't do too good with the long stringy ones from the lathe, but I didn't really expect it to. For everything else I was pretty impressed though.

                  It's little additions like this that make shop time more efficient for me, so I'm actually pretty glad to have it. Now the big guy can live in the basement and stay on sawdust duty, and I can attempt to keep the shop a little cleaner.

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                  • #24
                    Thanks Dan for the follow-up.
                    Yes long stringy chips and corrugated hose just don't get along, whether the hose is big or small it's all a matter of time.
                    Glad to hear it sucks. How is the noise level. I realize this is subjective, but are you ok with it or is it borderline earplug level of higher?
                    Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                    Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                    Location: British Columbia

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                    • #25
                      i HAVE ONE OF THESE. I thought about asking the manufacturer ,what is this thing supposed do? It is the weakest vac that I have seen.Edwin Dirnbeck

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Edwin Dirnbeck View Post
                        i HAVE ONE OF THESE. I thought about asking the manufacturer ,what is this thing supposed do? It is the weakest vac that I have seen.Edwin Dirnbeck
                        Mine sucks pretty good until I get too many chips and curlies stuck in the hose. I use a wooden dowel to push some of them out and then reverse the hose and let the vacuum suck the rest out. It would be much better if the hose was smooth inside but then it would probably collapse.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Willy View Post
                          Thanks Dan for the follow-up.
                          Yes long stringy chips and corrugated hose just don't get along, whether the hose is big or small it's all a matter of time.
                          Glad to hear it sucks. How is the noise level. I realize this is subjective, but are you ok with it or is it borderline earplug level of higher?
                          That's one of the things that surprised me the most. It's actually not that bad IMO. I don't have a DB meter to quantify it, but it's about the same as my big shopvac. I wonder if there's an app I can dl to measure..... I was expecting it to be much worse TBH.

                          I hate loud, high pitched noises, and didn't feel the need to put on hearing protection right away, though with all things of this nature it's probably a good idea.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Doc Nickel;n1950697[SIZE=18px
                            ]If you possibly can, find a smooth-bore hose for your shop vac.[/SIZE] I picked mine up off eBay, as I recall- not as cheap as the corrugated stuff, more like trash pump inlet hose. But it was worth every penny.

                            If the stuff can get past the nozzle- the smallest point- it basically never jams mid-hose. That's one of the most helpful shop-vac tricks out there. I'd wager it helps suction too, as the smoother bore reduces air friction and turbulence as well.

                            Doc.
                            I've looked all over for smooth ID hose. Found a few but the ID's don't even come close to the bastardized shop vac sizes and the stuff isn't flexible enough for vac hose. Would have to make some PVC adapter sleeves.
                            But the stuff wasn't cheap. For years I've been using an old Electrolux rubber vac hose that has minimal corrugation on the ID, almost smooth. It's worked fine but over time the oil has caused the hose to keep splitting just behind the wand. I would have to keep cutting it back. Now that hose is about four foot long ! I can barely reach the top of my mill table. Time to do something.

                            What I did find was a commercial pool vac hose that was smooth and somewhat flexible, but I don't think it'll hold out to oil.

                            This was the last hose I looked at...... not cheap ! https://toolsforworkingwood.com/stor...L_Vacuum_Hoses

                            JL.............
                            Last edited by JoeLee; 07-21-2021, 08:48 AM.

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                            • #29
                              That link has some "absorbent" prices.... Replacing the hose for just one of the vacs here would cost $170. Considering one vac cost about $60, and the other was free (it was new, but free since I was a test user), that is a bit steep. But, to avoid clogs, maybe.

                              $340 to avoid "most" clogs? Hmmmmm.

                              The "Hang up" vac has a flaw that the new hose would not fix. At the vac end of the hose, there is a fitting going into the dust bucket. That fitting has a sharp 90 deg turn in it, to direct the air around the inside of the bucket, and not straight into the filter. It is a short fitting, only a bit over an inch long, and is not a smooth curve, so 60% of the clogs happen right there.
                              2730

                              Keep eye on ball.
                              Hashim Khan

                              Everything not impossible is compulsory

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                I guess we'll have to focus more on chip breakers at those prices!
                                Not always easy to do though for some material.
                                Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                                Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                                Location: British Columbia

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