Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

I'm Amazed At The Intricacy Of These Joints

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    The eraser for marking knife lines is also known as a smoothing plane

    As for the layout tools used there again watching the videos on making the joints for restoration parts or even new builds shows how they do a lot with a little. The better videos include the laying out of the lines.

    Watching these is ever bit as satisfying as any of the machining videos we all like to watch. It's also a good example of how good accuracy can be achieved with very basic tools. Notice I said ACCURACY and not PRECISION in a hope to avoid the age old discussion of precision to some standard of measurement vs accuracy of fitting one part to another. Although to be fair they seem to manage to do both as seen by the relative lack of fitting and fine tuning.
    Chilliwack BC, Canada

    Comment


    • #17
      Wow - some of those joints you would be screwed if you cut and finished the total board length to long or short - so they gotta be just right...

      at least when we make mistakes we got a 50/50 chance of correcting them lol

      Comment


      • #18
        From the same people that made this a sport

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u6QzM4aFjjg
        I just need one more tool,just one!

        Comment


        • #19
          If memory serves, the intricacy and skill of those joints stemmed from the scarcity of tall trees (long boards). Joining two boards together to make one long rafter or support beam…you gotta be damned good. No cutting corners. Pardon the pun
          Last edited by rmcphearson; 07-14-2021, 03:06 PM.
          -Roland
          Golf Course Mechanic

          Bedminster NJ

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by wierdscience View Post
            From the same people that made this a sport

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u6QzM4aFjjg
            That was amazing. Didn't know they had wood shaving competition. I would guess you need select boards to make "tissue paper" thin cuts or thinner. Not sure what kind of wood they were using, one board looked like pine but I doubt shaving that thin can be done with any type of wood.

            How do they grade the competitors ?? thinnest cut and most consistent ?

            JL..............

            Comment


            • #21
              https://youtu.be/J4EO5L7D_NQ

              Comment


              • #22
                Also: https://youtu.be/BBzszOLt2Ms

                Comment


                • #23
                  One more: https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x7kycv4

                  Begin japanology is a program made by NHK in Japan for foreign audiences about a variety of subjects.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by rmcphearson View Post
                    If memory serves, the intricacy and skill of those joints stemmed from the scarcity of tall trees (long boards). Joining two boards together to make one long rafter or support beam…you gotta be damned good.No cutting corners. Pardon the pun
                    Badda boomp CHING! (that's the usual Vaudevillian drum and cymbal sound for a groaner) :d

                    Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
                    That was amazing. Didn't know they had wood shaving competition. I would guess you need select boards to make "tissue paper" thin cuts or thinner. Not sure what kind of wood they were using, one board looked like pine but I doubt shaving that thin can be done with any type of wood.

                    How do they grade the competitors ?? thinnest cut and most consistent ?

                    JL..............
                    Joe, a micrometer is used to gauge the thickness of the strip during those competitions.

                    I'm not sure what the wood is either. But it is certainly selected for straight grain and no knots. It'll also likely be some sort of wood without a strong difference from winter to summer rings so it cuts evenly.

                    I don't get shavings as clean and thin as they get but my own planes when sharpened well can get pretty nice thin shavings even on maple and oak. In fact those hardwoods are so hard to plane that the only way to do it is with a thin shaving setting.

                    This one from a piece of construction wood which I dug out of my trash in the wood tools area is a whisper under .003 and pretty typical of a normal thickness of cut for the foreplane used to just flatten and true. My smoother is dull at the moment so I can't get a good read of what it does. But it would probably be more in the range of .0015 to .002.

                    Click image for larger version

Name:	P1040237.JPG
Views:	49
Size:	189.4 KB
ID:	1951537

                    There's nothing unusual about my results either. Anyone with a nicely sharpened blade mounted in a body with a properly tuned sole would get much the same results.

                    Chilliwack BC, Canada

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X