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Hammer and rope trick for stuck bolts or nuts

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  • #46
    Just imagine if I asked how to get rusty manifold bolts out!
    Andy

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    • #47
      Originally posted by vpt View Post
      Just imagine if I asked how to get rusty manifold bolts out!
      Ha Ha Ha
      Trouble maker, ya may as well start an oil thread. LOL
      Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
      Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

      Location: British Columbia

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      • #48
        Originally posted by polaraligned View Post


        My exact thoughts....Everyone has a better idea to piss on your parade...
        I dunno.... I like the rope idea. It surely has places where it is good, and situations where it would not be the right choice, but that's true of everything. There are situations where the "rope rick" may save a good deal of aggravation and probably save you from whacking your knuckles into something sharp, or just hard and in the way,

        A number of us are planning to remember the trick if we were not already using some version of it.

        There's just a couple folks where I hear that "Hssssssss" into the leaves.
        CNC machines only go through the motions.

        Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
        Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
        Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
        I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
        Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

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        • #49
          Originally posted by rcaffin View Post
          Steel bolts tend to seize up a bit when driven hard into aluminium and left for a few years. Well, some WD40 and a lot of patience usually (OK, sometimes) works.

          Cheers
          Roger
          PS: bolts replaced, with nickel anti-seize on the threads, and not too tight.
          That tip I will take to the bank, thanks..

          "The combination of slightly soft hex cavities which are way undersize compared to real cup heads and nothing you can grip onto is an utter pain."

          That is a big pain. I just ran into some shallow hex "holes" and almost stripped it with the impact. I re-set it just hoping to get the 3/8" screw out. Sometimes there is junk in the hole. Not this case, just a shallow hex hole. Hate them. Yeah, I take a lot of stuff apart.. JR

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          • #50
            Wait, people try using air ratchets to break free bolts? Those arent impact tools, the actual grunt is supposed to come from the user. The air assist is just handy for spinning fasteners on faster in confined spaces, or just saving your wrist. They work great for putting bolts in a transmission pan, for example (air ratchet to spin the bolts on, torque wrench to spec). Air to speed things up, torque by hand

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            • #51
              Sorry Andy im not knocking it just looked like there was ample room to get it off but your the one that was actually there so i'll take your word for it --- to me it looked like you could have actually got two hands up there one for pulling and the other to brace when the fastener cracked loose so things could stay "in control" but again like you stated "you would have had to be there" and I wasn't.

              FWIW I have resorted to something very similar when there simply was no other alternative but in a "push" type way instead of pulling --- taking a certain size pipe that kinda "cups" the rounded end of the open end part of the wrench and then my hand sledge to the pipes end...
              perhaps more control and very direct but still if the wrench has a 15 degree offset you better have a good fit on that fastener or you might be sorry and round it off as that part will never be direct and you will not "get a feel for it" ....

              the only thing worse than hard to reach fasteners is hard to reach fasteners that are rounded off, now your really "screwed"....

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              • #52
                Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

                I dunno.... I like the rope idea. It surely has places where it is good, and situations where it would not be the right choice, but that's true of everything. There are situations where the "rope rick" may save a good deal of aggravation and probably save you from whacking your knuckles into something sharp, or just hard and in the way,

                A number of us are planning to remember the trick if we were not already using some version of it.
                .
                Same here -- I've heard a lot, but this trick is a new one on me. So it's filed away for the future just in case.
                I really try to avoid situations like the one in the video tho LOL they're just no fun
                25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                • #53
                  You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 1 photos.
                  Andy

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                  • #54
                    You know anti-seize works good for that too Andy

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                    • #55
                      Choose your rope wisely, common materials are often nylon or a polyester blend which would be like trying to hypnotize chickens.

                      I splice lifting slings from Dyneema, splicing 12 strand is easy, the several dollars per foot cost will put off most people.
                      The black rope is 3/8" diameter that has been spliced into a small loop, the blue line is 3/16" with no splice.

                      The literature suggests that 3/16" diameter rope has a tensile strength of 5400 pounds and 3/8" diameter a tensile strength of 19,000 pounds. This material exhibits a very low amount of stretch.


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                      • #56
                        Bented - any of that stuff related to my "spectra" river rescue rope? I know it's damn good for tensile strength also and so flexible would seem to be ideal for Andy's "rig"...

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                        • #57
                          Yes, Dyneema and Spectra are trade names much like Plexiglas, Lucite or Perspex.
                          Clear acrylic, (polymethyl methacrylate)

                          Polyoxymethylene or POM is branded as Delrin.

                          Polycarbonate is branded as Lexan, Makrolon and Tuffak

                          This 12 strand hollow braid is dead easy to splice, this is an unfinished eye splice, the important part is to taper then bury the tail 20-30 diameters deep which requires a fid.
                          A closed loop is a snake eating its own tail.

                          Last edited by Bented; 07-17-2021, 01:46 AM.

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                          • #58
                            Nice trick.
                            21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                            1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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                            • #59
                              Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post

                              You know anti-seize works good for that too Andy
                              I can not stand anti seize! Messy useless stuff IMO. Drys out and turns to cement. The heavy disc grease seals the thread on the bleeds very well for vacuum bleeding and holds up perfectly against the heat and does not dry out. Never had a rusted bleeder since I started using it.
                              Andy

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