Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Dirt Cheap Power Tailstock Feed for your Lathe

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Dirt Cheap Power Tailstock Feed for your Lathe

    I posted this on another forum, but thought I would also share it here. Many years ago I came up with a simple power feed arrangement for the tailstock on my 9" South Bend when drilling, tapping, etc.

    I got a two piece clamping shaft collar with an ID the same size as my tailstock spindle. Then I made a forked bracket that engaged the shaft collar as shown in the photo. Bingo, I had a power tailstock feed. Just slightly loosen the tailstock clamp and let the carriage pull it along at the desired feed rate.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	power tailstock2.jpg
Views:	553
Size:	207.8 KB
ID:	1951463 Click image for larger version

Name:	power tailstock1.jpg
Views:	521
Size:	214.5 KB
ID:	1951464

  • #2
    On deep holes, Most of the time and effort is in clearing the chips and brushing on the cutting lube.

    I've got a bolt in the cross slide that ties to the tail stock. I never use it though.

    Reversing the work with the drill deep in the chip is inviting a broken lip.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by CalM View Post
      On deep holes, Most of the time and effort is in clearing the chips and brushing on the cutting lube.

      I've got a bolt in the cross slide that ties to the tail stock. I never use it though.

      Reversing the work with the drill deep in the chip is inviting a broken lip.
      yes, you need to let it "dwell" long enough to quit cutting before reversing. Even then, if you wait too long, it may jam just on packed chips.

      But, that system is actually pretty cool. Let's you stop, reverse, disengage, all with little trouble. Only problem for me is that I would find it hard to find a slow enough feed. But the Logan is not one with power feeds.
      CNC machines only go through the motions

      Comment


      • #4
        Of course, I must admit to having THREE of these for the CXA on my Mazak Ajax Hercules

        https://www.aloris.com/aloris-produc...er-holder-ea-5

        Whoa! CAN YOU BELIEVE THE COST!

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by CalM View Post
          Of course, I must admit to having THREE of these for the CXA on my Mazak Ajax Hercules

          https://www.aloris.com/aloris-produc...er-holder-ea-5

          Whoa! CAN YOU BELIEVE THE COST!
          I don't think you have three of those. You have three of the CXA version, which are in a little different league, price-wise:

          https://www.aloris.com/morse-taper-holder-cxa-5
          The one you linked to is an 'EA' holder, which as far as I'm aware, is the largest toolpost size they make.

          Power feed using the carriage and tailstock works fine in my experience, I have used the drag along method on plenty of lathes. Clearing the chips is easy if the carriage and tailstock are locked together, just turn off the feed and back the carriage up with the handwheel, then bring it back and engage the feed again. Especially easy with readouts. However, I generally like using the tailstock handwheel better for most things, because I get a better feel of when there's a chip clogging problem.

          My method is generally to set the tailstock where I want it to get a nice even number on the barrel graduations with the drill at full diameter, then back the carriage up until it bumps into the front of the tailstock. Then I drill until I feel it's time to clear chips. At that point I unclamp the tailstock and pull the entire tailstock (and drill with it) completely back until the drill is out of the hole, then shove back forward until the tailstock bumps back into the carriage. Proceed drilling where I left off, continue the pattern until the hole is to depth.

          I have one of the Aloris Morse.taper adapters, those should work very well also. Need to get a few more.
          Last edited by eKretz; 07-15-2021, 04:21 AM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks T. And you now know what my next whittling project will be.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by eKretz View Post
              [snip]
              My method is generally to set the tailstock where I want it to get a nice even number on the barrel graduations with the drill at full diameter, [depth?] then back the carriage up until it bumps into the front of the tailstock. Then I drill until I feel it's time to clear chips. At that point I unclamp the tailstock and pull the entire tailstock (and drill with it) completely back until the drill is out of the hole, then shove back forward until the tailstock bumps back into the carriage. Proceed drilling where I left off, continue the pattern until the hole is to depth.
              [snip]
              I like it! Much better than keeping the tailstock clamped and pulling the bit back with the tailstock spindle feed (too much (!) handle spinning).

              Comment


              • #8
                I like it for the cool concept.
                But I think the best (not cheapest) idea
                is to put a Servo type milling machine
                table power feed on the tailstock.
                Especially on a large lathe, it would be nice.

                -Doozer

                Last edited by Doozer; 07-15-2021, 09:27 AM.
                DZER

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Bob Engelhardt View Post

                  I like it! Much better than keeping the tailstock clamped and pulling the bit back with the tailstock spindle feed (too much (!) handle spinning).
                  From your original quoted reply where you made the change in red: not at full depth, just when the drill has fully engaged and is cutting at its full diameter. So in other words, when the drill is "zeroed" at the end of the workpiece. I might set up the tailstock so the barrel graduation is registering ½" for instance at that point, so it's easy to go to my required depth - for a 3" deep hole I would then need to stop at 3½" on the barrel. With multiple parts and readouts this is especially nice: write down the tool number and 'Z' readout where you stop the carriage and the drill depth will be the same every time on every part.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by eKretz View Post

                    From your original quoted reply where you made the change in red: not at full depth, just when the drill has fully engaged and is cutting at its full diameter. ...
                    Got it. I should have got in the first place as that is exactly what I do. Except it's never for multiple pieces.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X