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OT- Wood Preservative

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  • OT- Wood Preservative

    I have to make a new frame for my exterior door. The bottom has rotten away, Getting proper "treated" lumber for this is a no way. It is so wet, it twists and bends. Is there something I can apply, or let soak in for a while, that may extend the life of the wood?

  • #2
    I’ve used bondo to fill and patch in a similar situation.

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    • #3
      Google "wood preservatives."

      Here's one:
      https://www.amazon.com/Tenino-Copper...a-582500550910


      Or you can make your own by obtaining some propylene glycol and boric acid powder and mix them up, and soak your wood in that. The boric acid, though safe enough for human consumption, is toxic to the tiny decay organisms.

      But if moisture and rot are the concerns, I'd look for a synthetic material. My local REAL lumber dealer has their own door and window sash department and makes up door frames with a 8 or 9" synthetic piece on the bottom, finger-jointed to wood above.
      Last edited by lynnl; 07-15-2021, 06:18 PM.
      Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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      • #4
        I just replaced the mailbox post today - it was a "real" 2X4 I put in when I moved into the place 20 years ago,,, it not only rotted out - I found termites below the ground level mark - iv ran into this allot in this area - it's too dry for termites to go after your house,,, as long as your house wood is not contacting the ground for moisture.

        anyhoo --- put in a 4X4 --- (or I should say 3 1/2 X 3 1/2") figure that outta buy me some time at least until im dead then it will be someone else's problemo --- of course --- could be kicking myself well into the 90's and having to use my post hole digger again in colorado ground.... lol

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        • #5
          Make it out of Trex. A wood polymer composite.
          It will last as long as you need it to.

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          • #6
            Copper naphthenate - Rustoleum makes some: https://www.amazon.com/Rust-Oleum-19...52414987&psc=1

            If you got an actual lumber yard or builder's supply (not the orange or blue store) you should be able to find it. It's required by building code as a sealer when cutting PT wood in some applications but also works great on untreated wood.

            Do wear PPE and be aware that it gives off some fumes while it dries. A gallon goes a REALLY long way. It goes on like water but works great. I use it for doors, windows, cornice returns, etc. - anytime I replace a rotted section of my house, the new stuff gets a coat of this before going back to paint a week or two later.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by rws View Post
              I have to make a new frame for my exterior door. The bottom has rotten away, Getting proper "treated" lumber for this is a no way. It is so wet, it twists and bends. Is there something I can apply, or let soak in for a while, that may extend the life of the wood?
              Oldest trick in the book, still works: 5 parts linseed oil, 1 part genuine pure gum turpentine for the first application.
              The turps help the oil soak in. The oil cures (polymerizes and hardens) over time with exposure to sunlight and oxygen.
              Turns into plastic almost which bugs can't eat thru, it's too hard for them.
              Wait a month and then put another coat of pure oil.
              Just do that a couple times a year, it'll turn rock hard over the years.
              25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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              • #8
                Originally posted by rws View Post
                I have to make a new frame for my exterior door. The bottom has rotten away, Getting proper "treated" lumber for this is a no way. It is so wet, it twists and bends. Is there something I can apply, or let soak in for a while, that may extend the life of the wood?
                Was it insect damage or dry rot?

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                • #9
                  Wood, treated or not, is never a good idea if it will be in contact with a surface that is wet much of the time. Plastic or metal for the win on this. Or even do the sill in concrete. Set the three sided only frame over it with a small separation, again to avoid contact of the end grain with a potential moisture source, fixed to the rest of the structure. Then fill the gap with one of the modern miracle sealants to stop drafts and insects. It'll also insulate the end grain from the sill.

                  If you go around to some door places you should be ale to find a metal sill plate. The door set I installed when I put in my new basement door came with a metal sill plate with built in flexible seal for the door sweep. And all the existing exterior doors in the house have metal sill plates other than the fancy front door.

                  The linseed oil sounds good. But once installed you won't be able to reach the lower side and ends to add oil in the future. So it's still a metal sill plate for the win in my books....
                  Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                  • #10
                    I have a small supply of 4x4, 2x4, 2x6 and one long 2x12 treated lumber in the shed. It is on open racks so it dries out after a couple of weeks especially in summer when the dry heat under the shed roof tends to bake it pretty good. When I want to use it for something needing rot protection and that needs to be painted, I go to that dried, treated wood and always find a piece that is straight and long enough. Paint holds just fine and the rot seems to stay away.
                    S E Michigan

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by OaklandGB View Post
                      I have a small supply of 4x4, 2x4, 2x6 and one long 2x12 treated lumber in the shed. It is on open racks so it dries out after a couple of weeks especially in summer when the dry heat under the shed roof tends to bake it pretty good. When I want to use it for something needing rot protection and that needs to be painted, I go to that dried, treated wood and always find a piece that is straight and long enough. Paint holds just fine and the rot seems to stay away.
                      Good idea, but I've had to screw them down to keep them from warping. They are so soaked they need a slow dry time.

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                      • #12
                        Copper naphthenate has not worked for me at all.
                        Copper-Chrome-Arsenic is the only way to go.
                        Maybe Osmos is still in business.

                        --Doozer
                        DZER

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