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New project. 1980 F250 4x4 work truck

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  • New project. 1980 F250 4x4 work truck

    Made the same year I was born, friend selling it to me. His other friend destroyed the engine. It’s getting a new engine at the shop. Either a 351W or a 400. 4x4.
    I’m going to do all the body work, buying patch panels and TIG welding. I’d use a MIG but I own only a TIG.
    I’ve been in heaven ever since I discovered the LMC catalog. Going to need new floor pans, rockers, cab corners, front left fender and left door patch on the extra left door I have. Parts are plentiful and cheap for these old trucks, gotta love it!


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    Last edited by RB211; 07-17-2021, 12:40 PM.

  • #2
    NIce! Had one of those (F350 SRW) for a shop truck back in 1997 or so. Had the 7.3 international diesel with 4-spd granny tranny. NP435/NP205 combo gearboxes. Couldn't break that thing, instead it just rusted apart, literally. But damn it was STRONG.
    25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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    • #3
      You are somewhat eccentric I suspect (-:
      I was born in 1959 and have zero interest in any vehicle produced before 2010 or so, a ten year old used cars is my limit.

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      • #4
        👍 My dad had an '83 F150 with the 300 six and a 4-speed so I have a soft spot for that era of trucks



        Isn't everyone on HSM eccentric? 😁
        Location: Northern WI

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        • #5
          The 300 straight 6 was one of Ford's best engines. Not great on mileage, but lots of power and would go forever.
          Kansas City area

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          • #6
            very neat! That'll keep you out of trouble for a while

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            • #7
              Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
              NIce! Had one of those (F350 SRW) for a shop truck back in 1997 or so. Had the 7.3 international diesel with 4-spd granny tranny. NP435/NP205 combo gearboxes. Couldn't break that thing, instead it just rusted apart, literally. But damn it was STRONG.
              No rust on the frame, just the cab. It already spent its last winter in Maine, will never see salt again.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Bented View Post
                You are somewhat eccentric I suspect (-:
                I was born in 1959 and have zero interest in any vehicle produced before 2010 or so, a ten year old used cars is my limit.
                I wanted something that was cheap to keep going forever. It’s also a kick ass off-roader. Front and rear Posi.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by RB211 View Post
                  No rust on the frame, just the cab. It already spent its last winter in Maine, will never see salt again.
                  Lucky you!
                  25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                  • #10
                    That project should keep you busy for quite a while. Hows the garage clean out project progressing?

                    Being from New York state I have seen/owned more than my share of rusty vehicles. I have a real appreciation for the condition of the vehicles here in South Carolina, tons of 80's vintage pickups on the road, most all original with no restoration work.

                    Actually the TIG is a better way to repair/replace panels. Those TV shows doing high dollar restorations seem to always use tig for panels.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Sparky_NY View Post
                      That project should keep you busy for quite a while. Hows the garage clean out project progressing?

                      Being from New York state I have seen/owned more than my share of rusty vehicles. I have a real appreciation for the condition of the vehicles here in South Carolina, tons of 80's vintage pickups on the road, most all original with no restoration work.

                      Actually the TIG is a better way to repair/replace panels. Those TV shows doing high dollar restorations seem to always use tig for panels.
                      I’ve been in Maine, or at work, guess you can call me an official “snow bird”. My shop WILL need to be cleaned out. Better yet, I need to probably find some other place to have a workshop with 3x the floor space, or simply rent a space to work on the truck. Yeah, that would make more sense…

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Sparky_NY View Post
                        That project should keep you busy for quite a while. Hows the garage clean out project progressing?

                        Being from New York state I have seen/owned more than my share of rusty vehicles. I have a real appreciation for the condition of the vehicles here in South Carolina, tons of 80's vintage pickups on the road, most all original with no restoration work.

                        Actually the TIG is a better way to repair/replace panels. Those TV shows doing high dollar restorations seem to always use tig for panels.
                        You'd be amazed how much you can get for a clean square-body GM pickup in Buffalo nowadays.
                        25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

                          You'd be amazed how much you can get for a clean square-body GM pickup in Buffalo nowadays.
                          One just sold at auction, 76 miles, original for 96,000.
                          My truck is same thing as original Bronco, which are collector items. Clearly mine isn’t original, hell the front bumper is from a 70’s Chevy!! Ever since I got to Maine, I’ve been drooling over it. Apparently so has my wife, as she suggested we buy it!!!
                          Last edited by RB211; 07-17-2021, 09:24 PM.

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                          • #14
                            Few more photos, looks like it has a C6 tranny.
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                            Last edited by RB211; 07-17-2021, 09:25 PM.

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                            • #15
                              There was something about those old Ford 300-6 cylinder engines back in the eighties. I bought one new in '89 with a 4 speed granny. I put 300,000 miles on it and traded for something newer.. About ten years later I saw it at a service station, still clicking along. Talked to the owner and he didn't believe me about the mileage. Apparently the dealer had had changed the speedo or something. It was the same truck because of a peculiar paint scheme. The only thing it ever needed was a pan gasket and a couple of clutches. It still looked good. They don't make them like that any more..
                              Sarge41

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