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Whoa! I thought $300 hammers were only available to the Military!

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  • Whoa! I thought $300 hammers were only available to the Military!

    On sale for only #279.99 Canadian! Regular $330.99!

    https://www.kmstools.com/-stiletto-1...-hammer-173505

    Do you need a special training course to be able to use one of these?
    Now, someone is probably going to to explain why these are really worth that much, and they may well be right, but... not for me, thank you!
    "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

  • #2
    They're Ti bro. It's an expensive metal, + low production markup. Whether they are worth it to you... is up to you.
    21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
    1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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    • #3
      Quote: "15oz Titanium head drives like a 28oz steel hammer"

      So what are the physics behind this? How is it that Ti delivers more energy to the nail and steel bounces more back?

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      • #4
        A friend of mine, a retired carpenter, has told me many times that even though most nails these days are driven out of a gun, a titanium hammer seemed to add 20% more productivity to a long day, with a lot less fatigue at the end. He swore by his Ti hammers. He paid a good bit more than that when they were new on the market.

        Since Ti is 55% the weight of steel, the hammer hits faster with the same force behind it (energy is directly proportional to mass and proportional to the square of the speed), and has 45% less weight to raise for the next hit. More energy delivered to the nail, less weight to pick back up
        Last edited by DrMike; 07-17-2021, 01:22 PM.
        SE MI, USA

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        • #5
          Of course it's an expensive metal, and I can see using it where its particular properties are required, say, in a spacecraft. A hammer is essentially a weight at the end of a lever,
          which is manually operated to apply a force to ... a nail.

          I do see how a hammer is an improvement over a rock - ergonomic handle, flat striking surface, well balanced. Claw hammers even include a handy nail removal feature!

          Call me dense, or at least ignorant, but I'm having trouble seeing how this is such an improvement over a similar tool costing a fraction of the price made from a less costly material.
          I don't even see hammers used so much these days - most contractors use compressed air nail guns everywhere possible.

          Edit note - I posted this before posts #3 and#4. I do want to hear about the physics.
          "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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          • #6
            Since Ti is 55% the weight of steel, the hammer hits faster with the same force behind it (energy is directly proportional to mass and proportional to the square of the speed), and has 45% less weight to raise for the next hit. More energy delivered to the nail, less weight to pick back up
            So an Aluminum hammer with a hardened face somehow bonded on, might be even better?
            "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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            • #7
              Actually, this raises another question. Were those notorious $300 to the military hammers actually Ti? If so then they didn't overpay!?
              "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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              • #8
                Originally posted by mickeyf View Post
                So an Aluminum hammer with a hardened face somehow bonded on, might be even better?
                Ti is generally twice as strong as aluminum, but only 60% heavier.
                So an aluminum hammer would actually weigh more than a Ti hammer of the same strength.
                SE MI, USA

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                • #9
                  This is great! By once again fearlessly exposing my ignorance I have learned something new! But for the limited amount of hammering I do these days I don't think I'll be buying a TI hammer.
                  "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by mickeyf View Post
                    Actually, this raises another question. Were those notorious $300 to the military hammers actually Ti? If so then they didn't overpay!?

                    They didn't actually pay $300 for a hammer or $20000 for toilets seats, yes that one is not a misprint. That was how they spread the undocumented "black" budget spending out through other things. They just didn't do a very good job of it.
                    The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                    Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                    Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by DrMike View Post
                      ...
                      Since Ti is 55% the weight of steel, the hammer hits faster with the same force behind it (energy is directly proportional to mass and proportional to the square of the speed), and has 45% less weight to raise for the next hit. More energy delivered to the nail, less weight to pick back up
                      Unless it's momentum that drives the nail. Which is linear with velocity & weight, so higher velocity times less weight "cancels out".

                      "less weight to raise" still an advantage.

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                      • #12
                        It's not linear. The velocity component is squared, which makes it more important than the weight component. There are upper and lower limits on what is practical, though.
                        Kansas City area

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                        • #13
                          bit of a tangent, but related to the "less fatigue from a lighter hammer" bit - I once read that a top marathon trainer said they could predict the final placing of a full length marathon simply by looking at the ankles of the competitors. Smaller ankles = less energy to move the same distance = faster runner over the same distance. Thought to be one of the key advantages (along with sweating) that allowed hunter gatherers to run for 10s of miles (sometimes over 100 miles) a day hunting down game.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by DrMike View Post
                            Since Ti is 55% the weight of steel, the hammer hits faster with the same force behind it (energy is directly proportional to mass and proportional to the square of the speed), and has 45% less weight to raise for the next hit. More energy delivered to the nail, less weight to pick back up
                            So you are saying that it is the added velocity due to the lighter weight. Why would a 16 oz steel hammer with a lightweight wood handle not perform as well as the Ti hammer? Or would it?

                            I saw something online that said the steel head causes more of the energy to bounce back into the hammer. That is what interests me if it is true.

                            Last edited by polaraligned; 07-17-2021, 03:14 PM.

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                            • #15
                              I had never heard of titanium hammers, but there must be something in the concept. Consider an extreme example, putting in 1" nails into wood would be slow and hard work if you only had a 4 pound club hammer, but fast and easy with a 1/2 pound hammer.

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