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How do you check your threads when threading on lathe ?

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  • How do you check your threads when threading on lathe ?

    Over a long time i ammassed all these, covers me most of the time..

    also brought in my hex bars.. Click image for larger version

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  • #2
    Originally posted by 754 View Post
    Over a long time i ammassed all these, covers me most of the time..

    also brought in my hex bars.. Click image for larger version

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ID:	1952074
    Lol, I have almost the exact same set of precision thread checkers, same storage device too. I purchased mine from an old machinist along with a bunch of other treasures
    If it wasn't done the hard way, I didn't do it.

    Lillooet
    British Columbia
    Canada.

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    • #3
      Did you get a linebore from Roy C ? Do you use it ?

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      • #4
        I use thread wires. Final check with the mating nut afterward if I have it. Wires are always right for me.

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        • #5
          How do you check your threads when threading on lathe ?

          I'm not good on threading on the lathe. The way I check my cut threads is to test it on the either male or female part I am making the thread for..

          When cutting threads on the lathe I am almost certainty cutting it for an already cut thread. So I try to match it as best as possible for my skill.

          I have those thread checkers on a cable also. I like them but they are too shallow. The threaded piece dead heads before all the threads are engaged some times. I like the "plate" thread checkers. JR

          My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

          https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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          • #6
            I dont know about thread checkers on a cable.. these for the most part are over the counter nuts. There are probably a few a bit tighter fit.
            .really handy to have something in hand to check.... for most work. Not having to leave shop to get a sample helps.,

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            • #7
              Those don't work so well when you need an M11x1 like I did today. I guess I should write up a little rant about that...

              That's not even in the machinery's handbook so if you want to do right you gotta do all the math and measure over wires!
              21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
              1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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              • #8
                Originally posted by 754 View Post
                Did you get a linebore from Roy C ? Do you use it ?
                No, I didn't. Sometimes I think it would be nice to have one, but then I would have to fix the pins on the dumpbox on my truck, and that hasn't become a priority yet. 😁
                -Don
                If it wasn't done the hard way, I didn't do it.

                Lillooet
                British Columbia
                Canada.

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                • #9
                  Set the lathe up to the correct thread size, take the first light cut with the tooltip and when finished the first pass, out with a thread gauge of the appropriate size and check that you have set the lathe up correctly. If all is OK, continue cutting each pass and checking with the thread gauge, when you reckon it's getting close, out with whatever your test fitting the thread too. Could be a simple el-cheapo nut ,or , if you can check it with the job and keep taking light cuts until the test bit fits.

                  Test gauges come in either Metric, or that other stupid $ hit

                  https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl...MygBegUIARC2Ag


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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by eKretz View Post
                    I use thread wires. Final check with the mating nut afterward if I have it. Wires are always right for me.
                    I use thread wires when it matters or if I have nothing to match the thread too. Where possible it's "fit
                    to the mating part" and, in a lot of cases, I just grab a nut and make sure it fits. In the repair business
                    sometimes that's all that matters; no point in making a thread--or any part, for that matter--more precise
                    than it needs to be...
                    Keith
                    __________________________
                    Just one project too many--that's what finally got him...

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by 754 View Post
                      I dont know about thread checkers on a cable.. these for the most part are over the counter nuts. There are probably a few a bit tighter fit.,
                      Solly, my bust. I forgot the name of them. They are hardy and come in Metric and that other stupid system "+ JR

                      Click image for larger version

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                      My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                      https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by 754 View Post
                        I dont know about thread checkers on a cable.. these for the most part are over the counter nuts. There are probably a few a bit tighter fit.
                        .really handy to have something in hand to check.... for most work. Not having to leave shop to get a sample helps.,
                        I've used both thread wires and triangles with ease and success. For production runs we always had a set of go-no go nuts dedicated to the specific thread form, and provided by the customer. Gotta be careful with using over the counter nuts as a gauge. I've found they tend to be on the plus side for fit. Makes it easy to single point a thread that's a bit too large.

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                        • #13
                          Timely thread. Yesterday I needed to make a new back plate for a smaller chuck to fit on my Ellis dividing head. End goal was to flute a home made 1/2"-10 ACME tap. Make a tool to make a setup to make another tool to do the original job. Sigh. Had a great time in the shop. First I made a duplicate of the Ellis spindle that is 1.75"-8 so as to test the internal thread as I made it. To test the duplicate spindle I removed the back plate from the chuck it was on (the only thing that fit the Ellis). An obscenely heavy 6" adjust true 3 jaw chuck. It's so big it fouls the head of my Clausing 8520 vertical mill. The back plate alone was light enough to use as a sample. Once I had the duplicate spindle done I started on the back plate. I honestly wasn't paying much attention to how much I was taking off by the dials. I did take some care in boring out the back plate hole to what Machinery's Handbook said was the minor diameter of the internal thread for 1.75"-8 which was 1.6417". Every time I do a thread it seems to take much longer and more cuts than I imagine it would, esp. something this coarse. But by taking cuts and spring passes it seems to get there eventually. The duplicate spindle was a good fit in the new back plate so once that was done I finished drilling and tapping the chuck mounting bolt holes and mounted the chuck to the Ellis dividing head. First task done. I will take some time, maybe tomorrow, to measure with the thread wires to see how close (or far off I am). But it worked and that is what I was after. Oh yeah, all of this was done in 6061 Aluminum. Both the duplicate spindle and the back plate. This will never see any speed so it wont be an issue. Was a great deal of fun and I learned a lot.
                          Bill
                          San Diego, CA

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                          • #14
                            I lucked into a really large selection of go/no-go thread gauges. Most are inside, but I have a fair collection of outside gauges (like nuts) as well. (there were a lot of plain size gauges as well, which get more use.

                            They do not get a ton of use, but when needed, there they are.
                            2730

                            Keep eye on ball.
                            Hashim Khan

                            Everything not impossible is compulsory

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                            • #15
                              I usually make my own "GO-NO GO" gauge for the thread I am cutting (if I need it to fit). I recently had to cut some 2-1/4 x 8 internal threads (that had to fit), so I first cut a 2-1/4 x 8 male to the spec I needed for a gauge. Worked like a charm.

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