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Don't buy Chinese Turbos, eh? (Bastard threads)

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  • #31
    Originally posted by The Artful Bodger View Post
    Sounds like Whitworth, the rounded shape makes it look 'smoother'.



    Maybe 1.337?


    BSP
    1⁄16 28 0.907 0.3041 7.723 0.2583 6.561 5⁄32 4.0 6.6 6.8
    1⁄8 28 0.907 0.3830 9.728 0.3372 8.566 5⁄32 4.0 8.6 8.8
    1⁄4 19 1.337 0.5180 13.157 0.4506 11.445 0.2367 6.0 11.5 11.8
    BSP is Whitworth which means it even appears different to 60 degree 'V' threads. Whitworth is 55 degrees and has rounded tips and hollows, that is visibly different too. Of course it is possible to cut a 60 degrees V thread and have it engage in a Whitworth thread but it only fits where it touches.

    BSP is common in metric countries
    I should have said "definitely not 1.25". 1.337mm pitch is definitely out. The minor diameter doesn't match anyway.
    21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
    1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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    • #32
      Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post

      Turbo is a cheap, ebay "Turbo" brand turbo. Dad's choice. So what do you think. Proprietary thread, or general incompetence? I think the latter. I think it was threadmilled with a single point, I think they were off on both the diameter and perhaps the pitch as well, making for a thread that exists only on this run of turbos. At any rate that's my best guess. Anyone placing bets on if the damn thing works at all or blows up in the first five minutes. lol

      Don't buy cheap ****!
      I'd say you got 7/16 24TPI, common thread on Mitsubishi-IHI turbos and Harley Davidson motorcycle brake banjos!

      Just ask how do I know... had to order H-D banjo bolts for car project...embarrassing.
      Matches also your minor diameter on quick look.

      Apparently some other 'Murican junk uses the same banjo thread.
      https://www.brakeconnect.com/product...t-716-x-24-uns
      Last edited by MattiJ; 07-18-2021, 06:10 PM.
      Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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      • #33
        Originally posted by MattiJ View Post

        I'd say you got 7/16 24TPI, common thread on Mitsubishi-IHI turbos and Harley Davidson motorcycle brake banjos!

        Just ask how do I know... had to order H-D banjo bolts for car project...embarrassing.
        Matches also your minor diameter on quick look.

        Apparently some other 'Murican junk uses the same banjo thread.
        https://www.brakeconnect.com/product...t-716-x-24-uns
        I would say you are probably correct. Nice find.
        21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
        1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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        • #34
          Its not a bastard thread if your lathe can cut it without swapping gears..

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          • #35
            Originally posted by 754 View Post
            Its not a bastard thread if your lathe can cut it without swapping gears..
            Ha. I suppose that's true. That is one very nice thing about the Lagun, it's clones, and a lot of other modern Asain lathes. Full metric thread capabilities with no change gears. It only has one change, for module and DP. I've never needed to do that yet. I don't enjoy metric threading as much as standard (obviously) but it's not that bad.

            However, Matti went and proved Artful right (95% likely at least. Sorry Artful, I was replying a bit strongly, you are correct.) So now I guess it's not big deal to cut one if needed. I have dimensions, I can quickly cut an over the wire thread and probably even buy a tap or die. Still a stupid move on the part of the "Turbo" brand, but whatever.
            21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
            1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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            • #36
              No worries TMB and I trust we are still good buddies!

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              • #37
                Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post

                I would say you are probably correct. Nice find.
                Kudos, I have to confess that is a new one on me. Gonna file that one away for the future just in case. Stuff like this is why I have such a bad habit of collecting pre-war tap sets, from before anything standard. Keeps life interesting. Keeps my wallet nice and thin.
                25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                • #38
                  Thank you for the information.

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                  • #39
                    Dad contacted the mfg today, and according to them it is M11x1. I'm not sure they are correct, but hey. Not much else to go by.
                    21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                    1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post
                      Dad contacted the mfg today, and according to them it is M11x1. I'm not sure they are correct, but hey. Not much else to go by.
                      If that thread really was supposed to be M11x1 then somebody in manufacturing was way off.... like I said, probably using a dull tool. Or trying to program the entire thread milling cycle starting from bad parameters. Or both. Basically this is what you get from the "lowest bidder" and not enough QA.
                      25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                      • #41
                        For Dad's eye zoo zoo?
                        Just a thought, looks like a thin cross section on that banjo bolt
                        once you get all those holes in it. Yellow brass is pretty weak,
                        maybe 80,000 psi aluminum bronze would give me more of a
                        warm fuzzy feeling as for being strong enough. But if it works
                        it works. But great job on the part.
                        I ran into a 5/16"-20 thread the other week.
                        Was on a Greenfield tap wrench that was OLD.
                        I replaced the jumbled up slotted set screw
                        with a M-8 x 1.25 hex Allen set screw.
                        It fit perfect.

                        -Doozer
                        DZER

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                        • #42
                          Probably the oddest tap size I have is 5/16-27. This is required as an industry standard for certain shotguns and accessories. Yup, found it on eBay brand new.
                          25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by Doozer View Post
                            For Dad's eye zoo zoo?
                            Just a thought, looks like a thin cross section on that banjo bolt
                            once you get all those holes in it. Yellow brass is pretty weak,
                            maybe 80,000 psi aluminum bronze would give me more of a
                            warm fuzzy feeling as for being strong enough. But if it works
                            it works. But great job on the part.
                            I ran into a 5/16"-20 thread the other week.
                            Was on a Greenfield tap wrench that was OLD.
                            I replaced the jumbled up slotted set screw
                            with a M-8 x 1.25 hex Allen set screw.
                            It fit perfect.

                            -Doozer
                            Yes, an Isuzu, but not the one you may be thinking of. That one is being parted out to fix one taken off the road 18 years ago for a rusty cab.

                            I agree on the strength. We were looking at the 25ksi YS before making it. But, if it doesn't leak now, it shouldn't leak in the future. If we had any hex steel, I'd have used that. We were too lazy to mill our own hex.
                            21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                            1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post
                              If we had any hex steel, I'd have used that. We were too lazy to mill our own hex.
                              that's what cheap Harbor Freight pry bars are for cheap source of hex steel stock.
                              25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post

                                Sarge, damn that's genius! You guys are great! Thanks!
                                if the hole is big enough, even a broken off piece of wood with a sharp edge is good enough to press against the threads. I had to do that to measure a chuck backplate thread as I didn't have a 10tpi gauge. I've even raided the kids playdoh before to do the same

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